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Re: Gyroscope concepts

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  • mikefromspace
    Interesting that you brought this up. Gyroscopic motion of water was used by Victor Schaubager in the 60 s. Once place that sells info on this is Borderlands
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 1, 2007
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      Interesting that you brought this up. Gyroscopic motion of water was
      used by Victor Schaubager in the 60's. Once place that sells info on
      this is Borderlands Sciences of Arcata, Ca. If you create a gyro of
      water that is in a tube and reconnects to it's own end, the motion
      of force expelled outward is obviously much greater than that
      inward. Assuming that particle physics is just particles, this
      process creates a particle vacuum, which I'm certain is why he was
      able to make working flying saucers. Harassed by [EDIT; Expletive deleteds;EDIT]in our own gov. he disappeared to Austria later. If you run tapwater at 5000 rpm (or was it 50k?) in a 3/4" stainless steel (304 ideal I think) tube that connects to itself (1) keeps sharp angle so it spins twice as much as it travels throgh the tube (2) and is kept flowing using minor holes at skin of tube w/spiral fins inside that are angled to efficiently intercept the flow of the h20, you have
      produce then a small antigrav field which if wrapped around a sphere
      or standing egg or oval shape will levitate itself. Anyone ever
      experimented with this stuff? Water is magnetic under such
      conditions, and in a closed system can be monopolar. There's more to
      it but I don't have his work in front of me. It was reported that
      this made it's own power. I would theorize that tapping w/a wire
      onto various points of the tube wrapped around an oval would
      discharge an oscillation of electrons.
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