Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Silver Nail

Expand Messages
  • Steve Haag
    ... Dottie, I think we all where this face to some extent. ... Sounds wonderfully Jungian. This I think is where the universe excels and we re here peculiarly
    Message 1 of 30 , Nov 30 7:24 AM
      --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, dottie zold
      <dottie_z@y...> wrote:
      > the face was such a fright but then I realized it was
      > a face of long fought and hard won battles of the
      > soul.

      Dottie,

      I think we all where this face to some extent.
      >
      > ...a big long silver nail
      > was about to be driven into my head which was in a
      > sleeping position...
      >
      > Now, when I was walkind down the boulevard I saw a
      > Michael and the Devil statue with a silver sword and
      > it ocurred to me in that moment that the sword was not
      > of killing but of enlightning.

      Sounds wonderfully Jungian. This I think is where the universe
      excels and we're here peculiarly matched to appreciating this
      kind of triumph of process simultaneously including everyone
      with myriad synchronicities to wink us all home.
      >
      > I do not think Jesus came to divide rather he came to
      > unite.

      I feel that, too, in my heart. But it's interesting how Jesus' quotes
      so easily get used to justify the opposite of peace.
      >
      > What transition? The understanding Jesus transition?
      > What do you mean he's at his wits end trying to manage
      > his life mentally? And its good if he is at his wits
      > end and wanting Jesus to come in. Sometimes it takes
      > just that to really break through the barriers we have
      > set in ourselves.

      Well, from what I see, my friend is very good at brain equations,
      only everything is building on one side and there's no sense of
      what it all equals. He's a mastermind questioner, nquiry of
      questions that lead to more questions that stimulate more
      wonder of uncertainty. And it tightly knits him in acid juices of
      despare. But catharsis he seems resilient to.

      Kind of like the Father figure has
      > to fall in a sense for the Mother figure to come in.
      > And some of these people are so aligned with the
      > Father figure even if they are not speaking of Father
      > God that he has to take a dive before the Son can be
      > felt. For once when falls one has to reach within
      > oneself for something unknown on an outer level, but
      > when contemplated, known to always have been there on
      > an unspoken level.

      Yes, it's as though he's gathering all the resistance he can
      muster, like holding his breath until he almost dies, and only
      then will he breathe. Makes for the most full blown catharsis, I'm
      hoping!
      >
      > When I really got real with myself it was when the
      > male aspect of my self started to fold and realize it
      > did not know how to handle every single thing. And in
      > fact everysingle thing had to be on the table for me
      > to realize something was happening in that moment. And
      > then relief came after a while of having no place left
      > to look but inside.
      >

      Yes, for me it is the grok that there is something larger than little
      me, and that it's supportive, benevolent, expansive, inclusive. It
      doesn't even need a name, yet I feel it everywhere when I
      remember to.

      Steve
    • Frank Thomas Smith
      ... much ... back ... occassional ... root ... If any of you gringos want to wall away the pain, ordontological as well as financial, I recommend Argentina. A
      Message 2 of 30 , Dec 3, 2004
        JoAnn mused:
        >
        > Just wanted to second what Dottie had to say here. In my experience, it's
        much
        > much better to feel than not. You can wall away the pain -- "Poof! All
        > better!" -- well, for a while at least. But eventually it's going to come
        back
        > to teach you what you need to know. Kinda like you can ignore that
        occassional
        > twinge from your tooth; until one day your jaw is swollen and you need a
        root
        > canal *right* *now* -- before the anesthethic wears off. <G>

        If any of you gringos want to wall away the pain, ordontological as well as
        financial, I recommend Argentina. A visiting W-teacher from New York passed
        through, had to go to the dentist unexpectedly, and after treatment said
        he's coming back next year with his family and the savings in dentist fees
        will pay for the trip!
        Frank
      • Jo Ann Schwartz
        ... Hi Steve, Just wanted to second what Dottie had to say here. In my experience, it s much much better to feel than not. You can wall away the pain --
        Message 3 of 30 , Dec 3, 2004
          Stephen:
          >> This is where I go wrong, Steve. I hear this sadness
          >> and want to wish it away on a wing and a prayer. Poof!
          >> All better. Everyone come in from hide and seek,
          >> in from the dark, in for hot chocolate and
          >> laughter of ruddy faces.

          Dottie:
          > If we kiss it away it does not ever come to
          > reconciliation of a thing. Ever. It has been my path
          > to wake up to the idea that pain is okay. And then
          > what do we do with it.

          Hi Steve,

          Just wanted to second what Dottie had to say here. In my experience, it's much
          much better to feel than not. You can wall away the pain -- "Poof! All
          better!" -- well, for a while at least. But eventually it's going to come back
          to teach you what you need to know. Kinda like you can ignore that occassional
          twinge from your tooth; until one day your jaw is swollen and you need a root
          canal *right* *now* -- before the anesthethic wears off. <G>

          And, you can't really 'make it all better' for someone else. As the folk song
          notes:

          You gotta walk that lonesome valley
          You gotta walk it by yourself
          Ain't nobody else gonna walk it for you
          You gotta walk that lonesome valley by yourself....

          Musing on lonesome standard time....
          JoAnn
          (still trying to catch up)
        • gaelman58
          ... experience, it s much ... Poof! All ... to come back ... that occassional ... need a root ... the folk song ... On the other hand Sister Jo, ...yea,
          Message 4 of 30 , Dec 3, 2004
            >
            > Stephen:
            > >> This is where I go wrong, Steve. I hear this sadness
            > >> and want to wish it away on a wing and a prayer. Poof!
            > >> All better. Everyone come in from hide and seek,
            > >> in from the dark, in for hot chocolate and
            > >> laughter of ruddy faces.
            >
            > Dottie:
            > > If we kiss it away it does not ever come to
            > > reconciliation of a thing. Ever. It has been my path
            > > to wake up to the idea that pain is okay. And then
            > > what do we do with it.
            >
            > Hi Steve,
            >
            > Just wanted to second what Dottie had to say here. In my
            experience, it's much
            > much better to feel than not. You can wall away the pain --
            "Poof! All
            > better!" -- well, for a while at least. But eventually it's going
            to come back
            > to teach you what you need to know. Kinda like you can ignore
            that occassional
            > twinge from your tooth; until one day your jaw is swollen and you
            need a root
            > canal *right* *now* -- before the anesthethic wears off. <G>
            >
            > And, you can't really 'make it all better' for someone else. As
            the folk song
            > notes:
            >
            > You gotta walk that lonesome valley
            > You gotta walk it by yourself

            On the other hand Sister Jo, "...yea, though I walk through the
            valley of the shadow of death...et cetera, et cetera, et
            cetera....St. Yul Brynner


            > Ain't nobody else gonna walk it for you
            > You gotta walk that lonesome valley by yourself....
            >
            > Musing on lonesome standard time....
            > JoAnn
            > (still trying to catch up)
          • Steve Haag
            ... experience, it s much ... All ... to come back ... occassional ... need a root ... the folk song ... JoAnn, Half a dozen years after my mother died, I was
            Message 5 of 30 , Dec 4, 2004
              --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, Jo Ann Schwartz
              <sr_joanna@y...> wrote:
              > Just wanted to second what Dottie had to say here. In my
              experience, it's much
              > much better to feel than not. You can wall away the pain -- "Poof!
              All
              > better!" -- well, for a while at least. But eventually it's going
              to come back
              > to teach you what you need to know. Kinda like you can ignore that
              occassional
              > twinge from your tooth; until one day your jaw is swollen and you
              need a root
              > canal *right* *now* -- before the anesthethic wears off. <G>
              >
              > And, you can't really 'make it all better' for someone else. As
              the folk song
              > notes:
              >
              > You gotta walk that lonesome valley
              > You gotta walk it by yourself
              > Ain't nobody else gonna walk it for you
              > You gotta walk that lonesome valley by yourself....
              >
              JoAnn,

              Half a dozen years after my mother died, I was walking through a
              park, among people and jungle gyms, reading a bood called, "The
              Disowned Self" by Nathaniel Brandon. I was suddenly swept into all
              the acrued sadness and loss I'd not yet experienced from my mom
              dying. I sat down in a pool of tears, right there on the sidewalk
              while passers by passed, leaving me to my exposing grief.

              I'd like to think we're not entirely alone walking that lonely
              valley, although I do have a vision of doing just that. I like to
              think we echo to each other across our great divides and that brings
              some comfort, some sense of togetherness.

              Steve
            • Jo Ann Schwartz
              ... Hi Steve, As it happens, I believe we re rarely alone on that walk, even though mostly we think we are. Nonetheless, even with others to keep us company
              Message 6 of 30 , Dec 7, 2004
                --- Steve Haag wrote:

                > I'd like to think we're not entirely alone walking that lonely
                > valley, although I do have a vision of doing just that. I like to
                > think we echo to each other across our great divides and that brings
                > some comfort, some sense of togetherness.

                Hi Steve,

                As it happens, I believe we're rarely alone on that walk, even though mostly we
                think we are. Nonetheless, even with others to keep us company and provide
                comfort and encouragement, "ain't nobody else gonna walk it for you." And, of
                course, the flip side of that is "you ain't gonna walk it for nobody else."

                "Poof! All better! Come in for hot chocolate." doesn't work very well once you
                put aside childish things, neh? C'est la vie.

                Musing you don't need a watch to tell you...
                JoAnn
              • Steve Haag
                ... provide ... you. And, of ... nobody else. Joann, Yes, mostly we walk in relation to each other. I remember once, our son was a toddler, and he was
                Message 7 of 30 , Dec 8, 2004
                  --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, Jo Ann Schwartz
                  <sr_joanna@y...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I believe we're rarely alone on that walk, even though mostly we
                  > think we are. Nonetheless, even with others to keep us company and
                  provide
                  > comfort and encouragement, "ain't nobody else gonna walk it for
                  you." And, of
                  > course, the flip side of that is "you ain't gonna walk it for
                  nobody else."

                  Joann,

                  Yes, mostly we walk in relation to each other. I remember once, our
                  son was a toddler, and he was trying rather valiantly to get his head
                  physically into mine. I was laying down on my back on the carpet, and
                  he was sitting on my chest trying to press his forhead into mine. It
                  was as though the solidness was foreign to him and not quite
                  believable. Merging seemed the more natural thing.
                  >
                  > "Poof! All better! Come in for hot chocolate." doesn't work very
                  well once you
                  > put aside childish things, neh? C'est la vie.

                  But what if the childish thing is this dream world we're riding
                  tricycles through? I have a feeling we are pretty big spirits beyond
                  all of this.

                  Steve
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.