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  • VALENTINA BRUNETTI
    ... Subject: [anthroposophy_tomorrow] Re: Code poem for the French resistance What is interresting for those who have read Light for the New Millennium , that
    Message 1 of 13 , May 27, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      : Friday, May 28, 2004 5:24 AM
      Subject: [anthroposophy_tomorrow] Re: Code poem for the French resistance


      What is interresting for those who have read "Light for the New
      Millennium",
      that von Moltke in fact is one of the two people
      responsible for starting WWI.


      Hi,
      having read "Light..." I cannot agree at all with this stateement. Von
      Moltke was NOT responsible for anything about the start of the war. He was
      only a soldier: the responsibility,a s Steiner said, did fall on the heads
      of those "30 or 40 people" , most of the them politicians and most of them
      Westerners who were so "darkened inside"to be unable to stop the run to the
      Bloodbath. Von Moltke was also betrayed by his right hand under-commander
      who dis not follow his orders just causing the weakening of German troops at
      the Marna's battlefields....
      (When we'll be able to understand that the Contemporary Age's disaster has
      its roots into Central Europe's defeat in WW 1 we get a step ahead!)

      Andrea

      Although Steiner didn't seem to be
      aware of that; http://www.monju.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/index3d.htm


      --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, Tarjei Straume
      <cyberelf@c...> wrote:
      > At 23:58 27.05.2004, Deborah wrote:
      >
      > >Wonderful Yeats poem, Bryan--thank you for posting it. I find
      some
      > >small comfort in thinking that soldiers (of any nationality) who
      are
      > >slain with such idealism in their hearts must surely be honored
      by the
      > >spiritual world upon crossing over.
      >
      > Those were the thoughts of Rudolf Steiner too, during WW 1,
      although the
      > war was totally absurd and meaningless. I have some very different
      thoughts
      > about this anno 2004 that I've been carrying with me since the
      sixties, but
      > they will have to wait...
      >
      > >Here's my offering to those everywhere who must fight..........
      > >Deborah
      > >
      > >
      > > Code Poem for the French Resistance
      > >
      > >The life that I have is all that I have,
      > >And the life that I have is yours.
      > >The love that I have of the life that I have
      > >Is yours and yours and yours.
      > >
      > >A sleep I shall have
      > >A rest I shall have,
      > >Yet death will be but a pause,
      > >For the peace of my years in the long green grass
      > >Will be yours and yours and yours.
      > >
      > > --Leo Marks
      > > (1920 -- )
      >
      > Leonard Cohen has a beautiful song about the French resistance:
      >
      > ****************************************************************
      >
      > A PARTISAN
      >
      > When they poured across the border
      > I was cautioned to surrender,
      > this I could not do;
      > I took my gun and vanished.
      >
      > I have changed my name so often,
      > I've lost my wife and children
      > but I have many friends,
      > and some of them are with me.
      >
      > An old woman gave us shelter,
      > kept us hidden in the garret,
      > then the soldiers came;
      > she died without a whisper.
      >
      > There were three of us this morning
      > I'm the only one this evening
      > but I must go on;
      > the frontiers are my prison.
      >
      > Oh, the wind, the wind is blowing,
      > through the graves the wind is blowing,
      > freedom soon will come;
      > then we'll come from the shadows.
      >
      > Les Allemands étaient chez moi,
      > ils me disent, "résigne toi,"
      > mais je n'ai pas peur;
      > j'ai repris mon arme.
      > J'ai changé cent fois de nom,
      > j'ai perdu femme et enfants
      > mais j'ai tant d'amis;
      > j'ai la France entière.
      > Un vieil homme dans un grenier
      > pour la nuit nous a caché,
      > les Allemands l'ont pris;
      > il est mort sans surprise.
      >
      > [The Germans were at my home
      > They said, "Resigned yourself"
      > But I am not afraid
      > I have retaken my weapon
      > I have changed names a hundred times
      > I have lost wife and children
      > But I have so many friends
      > I have all of France
      > An old man, in an attic
      > Hid us for the night
      > The Germans captured him
      > He died without surprise.]
      >
      > Oh, the wind, the wind is blowing,
      > through the graves the wind is blowing,
      > freedom soon will come;
      > then we'll come from the shadows.
      >
      > ****************************************************************
      >
      >
      > Tarjei
      > http://uncletaz.com/





      Yahoo! Groups Links
    • epwijnantsresearch
      As shown by available documents, Moltke took the lead in advancing two propositions: first, that the alliance with Austria was absolutely central to Germany
      Message 2 of 13 , May 28, 2004
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        As shown by available documents, Moltke took the lead in advancing
        two propositions: first, that the alliance with Austria was
        absolutely central to Germany and had to be given top priority; and
        second, that war against the Triple Entente-Britain, France, and
        Russia, three countries that had pledged mutual friendship-was bound
        to break out not much later than 19 16 or 19 17, and that Germany
        would lose the war unless it launched a preventive attack
        immediately. Certain that war would come, Moltke wanted it sooner
        rather than later. He wanted it even though, like many of his
        colleagues, he feared that it would bring European civilization to
        an end.

        Instead of secondary opinions therefore, I think one should start
        with the original documents of the German and Austrian government
        itself at the time.

        First, regarding the Sarajewo incident often explained as the start
        of WWI, evidence shows that the Emperor, though horrified by the
        crime itself, was not unhappy that Franz Ferdinand was out of the
        way. He had not wanted to have the Archduke succeed him on the
        throne. "For me, it is a great worry less," he told his daughter in
        speaking of the Archduke's death. To a close aide he confided: "God
        will not be mocked. A higher power had put back the order I couldn't
        maintain." Even Berchtold noted in his diary that during the first
        cabinet meeting after the assassination there was "yes,
        consternation and indignation, but also a certain easing of mood."

        President Poincare of France was at the Longchamps racetrack when
        news of the Sarajevo killings was brought to him. He remained to see
        the end of the races. He then went about his usual routine. Paris
        was unaffected.

        In the spring of 1914, Moltke held talks with Gottlieb von Jagow,
        Germany's foreign minister. Jagow noted that Moltke told him that in
        two or three years the "military superiority of our enemies
        would ... be so great that he did not know how he could overcome
        them. Today we would still be a match for them. In his opinion there
        was no alternative to making preventive war in order to defeat the
        enemy while there was still a chance of victory. The Chief of the
        General Staff therefore proposed that I should conduct a policy with
        the aim of provoking a war in the near future."

        Moltke feared that Germans, especially Prussian Germans, would
        eventually be overwhelmed by the sheer number of Slavs unless action
        was taken promptly. He often had urged starting a war against
        Russia, before the Czar modernized and rearmed his empire. Yet
        Moltke also foresaw that in the modem age a war among Great Powers
        would destroy Europe.

        Until April 1913, Germany had an alternative war plan to wage war
        against Russia only. No longer was that true. Moltke had his general
        staff prepare a current war plan in I913-14 to deal with one
        eventuality only: a two-front war against France and Russia. He had
        good reason to keep details of the plan a closely held secret.

        With peace and respect,

        Eric

        --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "VALENTINA BRUNETTI"
        <okcgbr@t...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > : Friday, May 28, 2004 5:24 AM
        > Subject: [anthroposophy_tomorrow] Re: Code poem for the French
        resistance
        >
        >
        > What is interresting for those who have read "Light for the New
        > Millennium",
        > that von Moltke in fact is one of the two people
        > responsible for starting WWI.
        >
        >
        > Hi,
        > having read "Light..." I cannot agree at all with this stateement.
        Von
        > Moltke was NOT responsible for anything about the start of the
        war. He was
        > only a soldier: the responsibility,a s Steiner said, did fall on
        the heads
        > of those "30 or 40 people" , most of the them politicians and
        most of them
        > Westerners who were so "darkened inside"to be unable to stop the
        run to the
        > Bloodbath. Von Moltke was also betrayed by his right hand under-
        commander
        > who dis not follow his orders just causing the weakening of German
        troops at
        > the Marna's battlefields....
        > (When we'll be able to understand that the Contemporary Age's
        disaster has
        > its roots into Central Europe's defeat in WW 1 we get a step
        ahead!)
        >
        > Andrea
        >
        > Although Steiner didn't seem to be
        > aware of that; http://www.monju.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/index3d.htm
        >
        >
        > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, Tarjei Straume
        > <cyberelf@c...> wrote:
        > > At 23:58 27.05.2004, Deborah wrote:
        > >
        > > >Wonderful Yeats poem, Bryan--thank you for posting it. I find
        > some
        > > >small comfort in thinking that soldiers (of any nationality) who
        > are
        > > >slain with such idealism in their hearts must surely be honored
        > by the
        > > >spiritual world upon crossing over.
        > >
        > > Those were the thoughts of Rudolf Steiner too, during WW 1,
        > although the
        > > war was totally absurd and meaningless. I have some very
        different
        > thoughts
        > > about this anno 2004 that I've been carrying with me since the
        > sixties, but
        > > they will have to wait...
        > >
        > > >Here's my offering to those everywhere who must fight..........
        > > >Deborah
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Code Poem for the French Resistance
        > > >
        > > >The life that I have is all that I have,
        > > >And the life that I have is yours.
        > > >The love that I have of the life that I have
        > > >Is yours and yours and yours.
        > > >
        > > >A sleep I shall have
        > > >A rest I shall have,
        > > >Yet death will be but a pause,
        > > >For the peace of my years in the long green grass
        > > >Will be yours and yours and yours.
        > > >
        > > > --Leo Marks
        > > > (1920 -- )
        > >
        > > Leonard Cohen has a beautiful song about the French resistance:
        > >
        > > ****************************************************************
        > >
        > > A PARTISAN
        > >
        > > When they poured across the border
        > > I was cautioned to surrender,
        > > this I could not do;
        > > I took my gun and vanished.
        > >
        > > I have changed my name so often,
        > > I've lost my wife and children
        > > but I have many friends,
        > > and some of them are with me.
        > >
        > > An old woman gave us shelter,
        > > kept us hidden in the garret,
        > > then the soldiers came;
        > > she died without a whisper.
        > >
        > > There were three of us this morning
        > > I'm the only one this evening
        > > but I must go on;
        > > the frontiers are my prison.
        > >
        > > Oh, the wind, the wind is blowing,
        > > through the graves the wind is blowing,
        > > freedom soon will come;
        > > then we'll come from the shadows.
        > >
        > > Les Allemands étaient chez moi,
        > > ils me disent, "résigne toi,"
        > > mais je n'ai pas peur;
        > > j'ai repris mon arme.
        > > J'ai changé cent fois de nom,
        > > j'ai perdu femme et enfants
        > > mais j'ai tant d'amis;
        > > j'ai la France entière.
        > > Un vieil homme dans un grenier
        > > pour la nuit nous a caché,
        > > les Allemands l'ont pris;
        > > il est mort sans surprise.
        > >
        > > [The Germans were at my home
        > > They said, "Resigned yourself"
        > > But I am not afraid
        > > I have retaken my weapon
        > > I have changed names a hundred times
        > > I have lost wife and children
        > > But I have so many friends
        > > I have all of France
        > > An old man, in an attic
        > > Hid us for the night
        > > The Germans captured him
        > > He died without surprise.]
        > >
        > > Oh, the wind, the wind is blowing,
        > > through the graves the wind is blowing,
        > > freedom soon will come;
        > > then we'll come from the shadows.
        > >
        > > ****************************************************************
        > >
        > >
        > > Tarjei
        > > http://uncletaz.com/
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
      • epwijnantsresearch
        Early in the morning of Monday, July 6, before embarking, the German Kaiser sent for several officers to deliver messages for him. Admiral Eduard von Capelle,
        Message 3 of 13 , May 28, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          Early in the morning of Monday, July 6, before embarking, the
          German Kaiser sent for several officers to deliver messages for him.
          Admiral Eduard von Capelle, the deputy of Tirpitz, received a phone
          call between 7:oo and 8:oo a.m. summoning him. He found Wilhelm in
          the garden of his palace. Capelle recalled: "The Emperor walked up
          and down with me for a short while and told me briefly of the
          occurrences of the day before"-the blank check to Austria (to
          protect it in case Russia would attack whenever the Austrians
          decided to take action against Serbia) , an account of which Capelle
          apparently was to give to Tirpitz.

          The Kaiser "did not believe in serious warlike developments.
          According to his view, the Czar would not in this case place himself
          on the side of regicides. Besides that, Russia and France were not
          prepared for war. (The Emperor did not mention England.) On the
          advice of the Imperial Chancellor, he was going to start on the
          journey to Northland, in order not to create any
          uneasiness."(Kautzky's Memoirs ,1924 p. 47, )
          A similar message was sent by the hand of a naval officer, Captain
          Zenker, to his superiors. "His Majesty had promised" to protect
          Austria if Russia interfered "but did not believe that Russia would
          enter the lists for Serbia, which had stained itself by an
          assassination. France, too, would scarcely let it come to war, as it
          lacked the heavy artillery for the field armies. Yet though a war
          against Russia-France was not probable, nevertheless the possibility
          of such a war must be borne in mind from a military point of
          view."(See Zenker's Memoirs p.49.)

          In fact as clearly shown by David Fromkin in "Europe's Last Summer:
          Who Started the Great War in 1914?"(2004), Austria-Hungary lied when
          it claimed to be striking back for the murder of the Archduke. In
          fact, the killings at Sarajevo had relatively little to do with the
          Hapsburg desire to crush Serbia. What gave away Austria's lie in the
          first instance was that it did not attack immediately, which is what
          one does when one strikes out in anger or in self-defense.
          Alternativelv, one would pursue a full judicial inquiry to its
          conclusion, and then publish its results to the world, which Vienna
          lacked the patience to do.

          The fact-known now, though not then-that the memo submitted to the
          Kaiser in support of the plan to go to war was the same memo that
          had been prepared before the murders in Sarajevo shows hat it did
          not arise from that event.

          The Austrian ambassador in Berlin brought a copy of the ultimatum in
          final form the way it was going to be send to Serbia to Gotlieb von
          Jagow Germany's Foreign Minister in Berlin, later lied and denied
          having seen it before it went out. (However, in an interview on
          September 17, 1916, with American joumalist William Bullitt, he
          admitted that he had seen the ultimatum before it was sent. And
          Zimmermann, Jagow's number two, told a coleague (August 11, 19 17)
          that "it is true that we received the Serbian ultimatum about twelve
          hours before it was presented." Zimmermann wrote that it was
          pointless to keep on lying about it, since it "cannot be kept secret
          forever.")

          Jagow rechecked calculations and discovered that the Austrians
          planned to present the ultimatum an hour too soon while the French
          leaders were still in Russia. A panicked effort by Hapsburg
          officialdom, alerted by Jagow, resulted in moving that ultimatum
          time to an hour later.

          Certainly I am open if someone can disproof any of the above to
          change my mind. I am willing to go wherever the evidence takes me.

          With peace and respect,
          Eric
          --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "epwijnantsresearch"
          <epwijnantsresearch@y...> wrote:
          > As shown by available documents, Moltke took the lead in advancing
          > two propositions: first, that the alliance with Austria was
          > absolutely central to Germany and had to be given top priority;
          and
          > second, that war against the Triple Entente-Britain, France, and
          > Russia, three countries that had pledged mutual friendship-was
          bound
          > to break out not much later than 19 16 or 19 17, and that Germany
          > would lose the war unless it launched a preventive attack
          > immediately. Certain that war would come, Moltke wanted it sooner
          > rather than later. He wanted it even though, like many of his
          > colleagues, he feared that it would bring European civilization to
          > an end.
          >
          > Instead of secondary opinions therefore, I think one should start
          > with the original documents of the German and Austrian government
          > itself at the time.
          >
          > First, regarding the Sarajewo incident often explained as the
          start
          > of WWI, evidence shows that the Emperor, though horrified by the
          > crime itself, was not unhappy that Franz Ferdinand was out of the
          > way. He had not wanted to have the Archduke succeed him on the
          > throne. "For me, it is a great worry less," he told his daughter
          in
          > speaking of the Archduke's death. To a close aide he
          confided: "God
          > will not be mocked. A higher power had put back the order I
          couldn't
          > maintain." Even Berchtold noted in his diary that during the first
          > cabinet meeting after the assassination there was "yes,
          > consternation and indignation, but also a certain easing of mood."
          >
          > President Poincare of France was at the Longchamps racetrack when
          > news of the Sarajevo killings was brought to him. He remained to
          see
          > the end of the races. He then went about his usual routine. Paris
          > was unaffected.
          >
          > In the spring of 1914, Moltke held talks with Gottlieb von
          Jagow,
          > Germany's foreign minister. Jagow noted that Moltke told him that
          in
          > two or three years the "military superiority of our enemies
          > would ... be so great that he did not know how he could overcome
          > them. Today we would still be a match for them. In his opinion
          there
          > was no alternative to making preventive war in order to defeat the
          > enemy while there was still a chance of victory. The Chief of the
          > General Staff therefore proposed that I should conduct a policy
          with
          > the aim of provoking a war in the near future."
          >
          > Moltke feared that Germans, especially Prussian Germans, would
          > eventually be overwhelmed by the sheer number of Slavs unless
          action
          > was taken promptly. He often had urged starting a war against
          > Russia, before the Czar modernized and rearmed his empire. Yet
          > Moltke also foresaw that in the modem age a war among Great Powers
          > would destroy Europe.
          >
          > Until April 1913, Germany had an alternative war plan to wage war
          > against Russia only. No longer was that true. Moltke had his
          general
          > staff prepare a current war plan in I913-14 to deal with one
          > eventuality only: a two-front war against France and Russia. He
          had
          > good reason to keep details of the plan a closely held secret.
          >
          > With peace and respect,
          >
          >
          Eric
          >
          > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "VALENTINA
          BRUNETTI"
          > <okcgbr@t...> wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > > : Friday, May 28, 2004 5:24 AM
          > > Subject: [anthroposophy_tomorrow] Re: Code poem for the French
          > resistance
          > >
          > >
          > > What is interresting for those who have read "Light for the New
          > > Millennium",
          > > that von Moltke in fact is one of the two people
          > > responsible for starting WWI.
          > >
          > >
          > > Hi,
          > > having read "Light..." I cannot agree at all with this
          stateement.
          > Von
          > > Moltke was NOT responsible for anything about the start of the
          > war. He was
          > > only a soldier: the responsibility,a s Steiner said, did fall
          on
          > the heads
          > > of those "30 or 40 people" , most of the them politicians and
          > most of them
          > > Westerners who were so "darkened inside"to be unable to stop the
          > run to the
          > > Bloodbath. Von Moltke was also betrayed by his right hand under-
          > commander
          > > who dis not follow his orders just causing the weakening of
          German
          > troops at
          > > the Marna's battlefields....
          > > (When we'll be able to understand that the Contemporary Age's
          > disaster has
          > > its roots into Central Europe's defeat in WW 1 we get a step
          > ahead!)
          > >
          > > Andrea
          > >
          > > Although Steiner didn't seem to be
          > > aware of that; http://www.monju.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/index3d.htm
          > >
          > >
          > > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, Tarjei Straume
          > > <cyberelf@c...> wrote:
          > > > At 23:58 27.05.2004, Deborah wrote:
          > > >
          > > > >Wonderful Yeats poem, Bryan--thank you for posting it. I find
          > > some
          > > > >small comfort in thinking that soldiers (of any nationality)
          who
          > > are
          > > > >slain with such idealism in their hearts must surely be
          honored
          > > by the
          > > > >spiritual world upon crossing over.
          > > >
          > > > Those were the thoughts of Rudolf Steiner too, during WW 1,
          > > although the
          > > > war was totally absurd and meaningless. I have some very
          > different
          > > thoughts
          > > > about this anno 2004 that I've been carrying with me since the
          > > sixties, but
          > > > they will have to wait...
          > > >
          > > > >Here's my offering to those everywhere who must
          fight..........
          > > > >Deborah
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > > Code Poem for the French Resistance
          > > > >
          > > > >The life that I have is all that I have,
          > > > >And the life that I have is yours.
          > > > >The love that I have of the life that I have
          > > > >Is yours and yours and yours.
          > > > >
          > > > >A sleep I shall have
          > > > >A rest I shall have,
          > > > >Yet death will be but a pause,
          > > > >For the peace of my years in the long green grass
          > > > >Will be yours and yours and yours.
          > > > >
          > > > > --Leo Marks
          > > > > (1920 -- )
          > > >
          > > > Leonard Cohen has a beautiful song about the French resistance:
          > > >
          > > >
          ****************************************************************
          > > >
          > > > A PARTISAN
          > > >
          > > > When they poured across the border
          > > > I was cautioned to surrender,
          > > > this I could not do;
          > > > I took my gun and vanished.
          > > >
          > > > I have changed my name so often,
          > > > I've lost my wife and children
          > > > but I have many friends,
          > > > and some of them are with me.
          > > >
          > > > An old woman gave us shelter,
          > > > kept us hidden in the garret,
          > > > then the soldiers came;
          > > > she died without a whisper.
          > > >
          > > > There were three of us this morning
          > > > I'm the only one this evening
          > > > but I must go on;
          > > > the frontiers are my prison.
          > > >
          > > > Oh, the wind, the wind is blowing,
          > > > through the graves the wind is blowing,
          > > > freedom soon will come;
          > > > then we'll come from the shadows.
          > > >
          > > > Les Allemands étaient chez moi,
          > > > ils me disent, "résigne toi,"
          > > > mais je n'ai pas peur;
          > > > j'ai repris mon arme.
          > > > J'ai changé cent fois de nom,
          > > > j'ai perdu femme et enfants
          > > > mais j'ai tant d'amis;
          > > > j'ai la France entière.
          > > > Un vieil homme dans un grenier
          > > > pour la nuit nous a caché,
          > > > les Allemands l'ont pris;
          > > > il est mort sans surprise.
          > > >
          > > > [The Germans were at my home
          > > > They said, "Resigned yourself"
          > > > But I am not afraid
          > > > I have retaken my weapon
          > > > I have changed names a hundred times
          > > > I have lost wife and children
          > > > But I have so many friends
          > > > I have all of France
          > > > An old man, in an attic
          > > > Hid us for the night
          > > > The Germans captured him
          > > > He died without surprise.]
          > > >
          > > > Oh, the wind, the wind is blowing,
          > > > through the graves the wind is blowing,
          > > > freedom soon will come;
          > > > then we'll come from the shadows.
          > > >
          > > >
          ****************************************************************
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > Tarjei
          > > > http://uncletaz.com/
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        • epwijnantsresearch
          The Kaiser and many of his men were certain that none of the other Great Powers of Europe would intervene to halt the hoped for the expected Austrian strike.
          Message 4 of 13 , May 28, 2004
          • 0 Attachment
            The Kaiser and many of his men were certain that none of the other
            Great Powers of Europe would intervene to halt the hoped for the
            expected Austrian strike. They committed to ward off France and
            Russia in the firm belief that they never would be called upon to do
            so. They were signing a check that they believed would never be
            cashed.

            On July 24, Austria's Foreign Minister Count Leopold von Berchtold
            met with the Russian charge d'affaires, Count Kudashev in Vienna ,
            and delivered a soothing message: "nothing was further from our
            thoughts than the 'Wish to humiliate Serbia"; and the Dual
            Monarchy "did not aim at a territorial gain but merely y at the
            preservation of the status quo."

            Literally, Berchtold -,was telling the truth: Vienna did not intend
            to annex Serbia; it ruled too many Slavs already. But he was
            deliberately misleading: Austria-Hungary, according to Berchtold's
            chief aide at the foreign office, intended to partition Serbia but
            to take no part of Serbia for itself.

            In fact Berchtold was urged by Germany's foreign Minister Jagow in
            Berlin to declare war immediately, before the other powers stepped
            in to impose a peace settlement. In turn, the Austro-Hungarian
            foreign minister attempted to put pressure on his army chief,
            Conrad, who had been a persistent advocate of going to war in the
            past. Conrad claimed not to be ready. In Conrad's account:

            BERCHTOLD:We should like to deliver the declaration of war on Serbia
            as soon as possible so as to put an end to diverse influences. When
            do you want the declaration of war?

            CONRAD: Only when we have progressed far enough for operations to
            begin immediately-on approximately August 12.

            BERCHTOLD: The diplomatic situation will not hold as long as that.

            Germany's military leaders had focused on blaming Russia for the
            European conflict they foresaw and regarded as inevitable. This had
            been, and remained, Moltke's line. It was echoed on July 27 by
            Admiral von Mueller: Germany should, he told his diary, "remain calm
            to allow Russia to put herself in the wrong, but then not to shrink
            from war if it were inevitable." Germany's prime minister Bethmann
            agreed with the military on this: "In all events Russia must
            ruthlessly be put in the wrong," he told WilhelmII.

            The July crisis, as Moltke saw it, had evolved, happily for Germany,
            in such a way as to place it in a "singularly favorable situation."
            Harvests were in, the annual training of recruits had finished, and
            Russia and France would not be really ready for two years. Austria
            had put itself in a position such that it could not help fighting at
            Germany's side, and that was absolutely vital. As Moltke summed it
            up: "we shall never hit it again so well as we do now."

            At the same time British prime minister Herbert Asquith wrote in
            confidence to his friend Venetia Stanley "It is one of the ironies
            of the case,that we being the only Power who has made so much as a
            constructive suggestion on the direction of peace, are blamed by
            both Germany and Russia for causing the outbreak of war. Germany
            says: 'if you say you will be neutral, France and Russia wouldn't
            dare to fight,' and Russia says: 'if you boldly declare that you
            will side with us, Germany and Austria will at once draw in their
            homs. Neither of course is true."

            And France even the day War with Serbia broke knew nothing of the
            war crisis; the news of which everyone spoke was that Mme Caillaux
            had been acquitted!

            A note on sources, David Fromkin in "Europe's Last Summer: Who
            Started the Great War in 1914?"(2004) portrays Kaiser Wilhelm and
            those of his subordinates who contravened him as crisis evolved is
            especially relevant to understanding how German policy arrived at war
            (past the who;e link in your browser);

            http://www.foreignaffairs.org/20040501fabook83336/david-
            fromkin/europe-s-last-summer-who-started-the-great-war-in-1914.html


            He describes how high officials in the German and Austrian
            governments conspired to wage two wars of aggression - Austria
            against Serbia, Germany against Russia. These officials bear sole
            responsibility for the "Great War". This plot was formed well before
            June 28th, 1914. The date served only as a pretext for the violence
            previously planned by these two powers.

            He admits the Kaiser did not want the war and was overuled by his
            Army chief of Staff Moltke. German General Helmuth von Moltke (the
            younger) wanted Germany to confront Russia in war earlier rather
            than later because he perceived that Russia's French funded
            industrialization would gradually displace Germany as the leading
            military power in the world.

            And as expected, Russia backed up Serbia and mobilized, next
            Germany backed up their ally Austria by demanding Russia cease and
            desist. France backed up Russia Germany declared war on Russia and
            France and invaded so called neutral Belgium. Great Britain declared
            war on Germany and so it was ignited.

            I would say however that as Fromklin mentions himself , his an
            extensive analysis yet most of the original documents he referred to
            should be viewed in Annika Mombauer, Helmuth Von Moltke and the
            Origins of the First World War (2001).

            Also Fronmklin strength is that his analyses only concerns who
            started the War, and why.

            But as one critique stated; " Fromkin's most interesting point is
            that the war was actually two conflicts: one a local Austrian-
            Serbian conflict that was quickly forgotten by everyone else, and
            the second a long planned move by the Germans to prevent what they
            saw as their inevitable decline in Europe. In light of recent events
            in Iraq, Fromkin also does a good job of explaining how carefully
            laid plans can spin out of control and turn what was planned to be a
            short war into a long drawn out quagmire. It will be satisfactory
            for those who want or need a quick look at the beginning of the
            Great War. Those who desire a more indepth study should refer to the
            classic: Barbara Tuchman's The Guns of August." I agree with that
            and also read Barbara Tuchman's book.

            But for those interested in Moltke I would recommend Fromklin and
            the documents published in Mombauer's book are indeed sufficient.

            If notting else, pls if you chosse to offer counterevidence do so by
            at least quoting documents in Mombauer, Helmuth Von Moltke and the
            Origins of the First World War (2001), it can be viewed and copied
            in any major library near you.

            With peace and respect,
            Eric
            --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "epwijnantsresearch"
            <epwijnantsresearch@y...> wrote:
            > Early in the morning of Monday, July 6, before embarking, the
            > German Kaiser sent for several officers to deliver messages for
            him.
            > Admiral Eduard von Capelle, the deputy of Tirpitz, received a
            phone
            > call between 7:oo and 8:oo a.m. summoning him. He found Wilhelm in
            > the garden of his palace. Capelle recalled: "The Emperor walked up
            > and down with me for a short while and told me briefly of the
            > occurrences of the day before"-the blank check to Austria (to
            > protect it in case Russia would attack whenever the Austrians
            > decided to take action against Serbia) , an account of which
            Capelle
            > apparently was to give to Tirpitz.
            >
            > The Kaiser "did not believe in serious warlike developments.
            > According to his view, the Czar would not in this case place
            himself
            > on the side of regicides. Besides that, Russia and France were not
            > prepared for war. (The Emperor did not mention England.) On the
            > advice of the Imperial Chancellor, he was going to start on the
            > journey to Northland, in order not to create any
            > uneasiness."(Kautzky's Memoirs ,1924 p. 47, )
            > A similar message was sent by the hand of a naval officer, Captain
            > Zenker, to his superiors. "His Majesty had promised" to protect
            > Austria if Russia interfered "but did not believe that Russia
            would
            > enter the lists for Serbia, which had stained itself by an
            > assassination. France, too, would scarcely let it come to war, as
            it
            > lacked the heavy artillery for the field armies. Yet though a war
            > against Russia-France was not probable, nevertheless the
            possibility
            > of such a war must be borne in mind from a military point of
            > view."(See Zenker's Memoirs p.49.)
            >
            > In fact as clearly shown by David Fromkin in "Europe's Last
            Summer:
            > Who Started the Great War in 1914?"(2004), Austria-Hungary lied
            when
            > it claimed to be striking back for the murder of the Archduke. In
            > fact, the killings at Sarajevo had relatively little to do with
            the
            > Hapsburg desire to crush Serbia. What gave away Austria's lie in
            the
            > first instance was that it did not attack immediately, which is
            what
            > one does when one strikes out in anger or in self-defense.
            > Alternativelv, one would pursue a full judicial inquiry to its
            > conclusion, and then publish its results to the world, which
            Vienna
            > lacked the patience to do.
            >
            > The fact-known now, though not then-that the memo submitted to the
            > Kaiser in support of the plan to go to war was the same memo that
            > had been prepared before the murders in Sarajevo shows hat it did
            > not arise from that event.
            >
            > The Austrian ambassador in Berlin brought a copy of the ultimatum
            in
            > final form the way it was going to be send to Serbia to Gotlieb
            von
            > Jagow Germany's Foreign Minister in Berlin, later lied and denied
            > having seen it before it went out. (However, in an interview on
            > September 17, 1916, with American joumalist William Bullitt, he
            > admitted that he had seen the ultimatum before it was sent. And
            > Zimmermann, Jagow's number two, told a coleague (August 11, 19 17)
            > that "it is true that we received the Serbian ultimatum about
            twelve
            > hours before it was presented." Zimmermann wrote that it was
            > pointless to keep on lying about it, since it "cannot be kept
            secret
            > forever.")
            >
            > Jagow rechecked calculations and discovered that the Austrians
            > planned to present the ultimatum an hour too soon while the French
            > leaders were still in Russia. A panicked effort by Hapsburg
            > officialdom, alerted by Jagow, resulted in moving that ultimatum
            > time to an hour later.
            >
            > Certainly I am open if someone can disproof any of the above to
            > change my mind. I am willing to go wherever the evidence takes me.
            >
            > With peace and respect,
            > Eric
            > --- In
            anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "epwijnantsresearch"
            > <epwijnantsresearch@y...> wrote:
            > > As shown by available documents, Moltke took the lead in
            advancing
            > > two propositions: first, that the alliance with Austria was
            > > absolutely central to Germany and had to be given top priority;
            > and
            > > second, that war against the Triple Entente-Britain, France, and
            > > Russia, three countries that had pledged mutual friendship-was
            > bound
            > > to break out not much later than 19 16 or 19 17, and that
            Germany
            > > would lose the war unless it launched a preventive attack
            > > immediately. Certain that war would come, Moltke wanted it
            sooner
            > > rather than later. He wanted it even though, like many of his
            > > colleagues, he feared that it would bring European civilization
            to
            > > an end.
            > >
            > > Instead of secondary opinions therefore, I think one should
            start
            > > with the original documents of the German and Austrian
            government
            > > itself at the time.
            > >
            > > First, regarding the Sarajewo incident often explained as the
            > start
            > > of WWI, evidence shows that the Emperor, though horrified by the
            > > crime itself, was not unhappy that Franz Ferdinand was out of
            the
            > > way. He had not wanted to have the Archduke succeed him on the
            > > throne. "For me, it is a great worry less," he told his daughter
            > in
            > > speaking of the Archduke's death. To a close aide he
            > confided: "God
            > > will not be mocked. A higher power had put back the order I
            > couldn't
            > > maintain." Even Berchtold noted in his diary that during the
            first
            > > cabinet meeting after the assassination there was "yes,
            > > consternation and indignation, but also a certain easing of
            mood."
            > >
            > > President Poincare of France was at the Longchamps racetrack
            when
            > > news of the Sarajevo killings was brought to him. He remained to
            > see
            > > the end of the races. He then went about his usual routine.
            Paris
            > > was unaffected.
            > >
            > > In the spring of 1914, Moltke held talks with Gottlieb von
            > Jagow,
            > > Germany's foreign minister. Jagow noted that Moltke told him
            that
            > in
            > > two or three years the "military superiority of our enemies
            > > would ... be so great that he did not know how he could overcome
            > > them. Today we would still be a match for them. In his opinion
            > there
            > > was no alternative to making preventive war in order to defeat
            the
            > > enemy while there was still a chance of victory. The Chief of
            the
            > > General Staff therefore proposed that I should conduct a policy
            > with
            > > the aim of provoking a war in the near future."
            > >
            > > Moltke feared that Germans, especially Prussian Germans, would
            > > eventually be overwhelmed by the sheer number of Slavs unless
            > action
            > > was taken promptly. He often had urged starting a war against
            > > Russia, before the Czar modernized and rearmed his empire. Yet
            > > Moltke also foresaw that in the modem age a war among Great
            Powers
            > > would destroy Europe.
            > >
            > > Until April 1913, Germany had an alternative war plan to wage
            war
            > > against Russia only. No longer was that true. Moltke had his
            > general
            > > staff prepare a current war plan in I913-14 to deal with one
            > > eventuality only: a two-front war against France and Russia. He
            > had
            > > good reason to keep details of the plan a closely held secret.
            > >
            > > With peace and respect,
            > >
            > >
            > Eric
            > >
            > > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "VALENTINA
            > BRUNETTI"
            > > <okcgbr@t...> wrote:
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > : Friday, May 28, 2004 5:24 AM
            > > > Subject: [anthroposophy_tomorrow] Re: Code poem for the French
            > > resistance
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > What is interresting for those who have read "Light for the New
            > > > Millennium",
            > > > that von Moltke in fact is one of the two people
            > > > responsible for starting WWI.
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > Hi,
            > > > having read "Light..." I cannot agree at all with this
            > stateement.
            > > Von
            > > > Moltke was NOT responsible for anything about the start of the
            > > war. He was
            > > > only a soldier: the responsibility,a s Steiner said, did fall
            > on
            > > the heads
            > > > of those "30 or 40 people" , most of the them politicians and
            > > most of them
            > > > Westerners who were so "darkened inside"to be unable to stop
            the
            > > run to the
            > > > Bloodbath. Von Moltke was also betrayed by his right hand
            under-
            > > commander
            > > > who dis not follow his orders just causing the weakening of
            > German
            > > troops at
            > > > the Marna's battlefields....
            > > > (When we'll be able to understand that the Contemporary Age's
            > > disaster has
            > > > its roots into Central Europe's defeat in WW 1 we get a step
            > > ahead!)
            > > >
            > > > Andrea
            > > >
            > > > Although Steiner didn't seem to be
            > > > aware of that;
            http://www.monju.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/index3d.htm
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, Tarjei Straume
            > > > <cyberelf@c...> wrote:
            > > > > At 23:58 27.05.2004, Deborah wrote:
            > > > >
            > > > > >Wonderful Yeats poem, Bryan--thank you for posting it. I
            find
            > > > some
            > > > > >small comfort in thinking that soldiers (of any
            nationality)
            > who
            > > > are
            > > > > >slain with such idealism in their hearts must surely be
            > honored
            > > > by the
            > > > > >spiritual world upon crossing over.
            > > > >
            > > > > Those were the thoughts of Rudolf Steiner too, during WW 1,
            > > > although the
            > > > > war was totally absurd and meaningless. I have some very
            > > different
            > > > thoughts
            > > > > about this anno 2004 that I've been carrying with me since
            the
            > > > sixties, but
            > > > > they will have to wait...
            > > > >
            > > > > >Here's my offering to those everywhere who must
            > fight..........
            > > > > >Deborah
            > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > > > Code Poem for the French Resistance
            > > > > >
            > > > > >The life that I have is all that I have,
            > > > > >And the life that I have is yours.
            > > > > >The love that I have of the life that I have
            > > > > >Is yours and yours and yours.
            > > > > >
            > > > > >A sleep I shall have
            > > > > >A rest I shall have,
            > > > > >Yet death will be but a pause,
            > > > > >For the peace of my years in the long green grass
            > > > > >Will be yours and yours and yours.
            > > > > >
            > > > > > --Leo Marks
            > > > > > (1920 -- )
            > > > >
            > > > > Leonard Cohen has a beautiful song about the French
            resistance:
            > > > >
            > > > >
            > ****************************************************************
            > > > >
            > > > > A PARTISAN
            > > > >
            > > > > When they poured across the border
            > > > > I was cautioned to surrender,
            > > > > this I could not do;
            > > > > I took my gun and vanished.
            > > > >
            > > > > I have changed my name so often,
            > > > > I've lost my wife and children
            > > > > but I have many friends,
            > > > > and some of them are with me.
            > > > >
            > > > > An old woman gave us shelter,
            > > > > kept us hidden in the garret,
            > > > > then the soldiers came;
            > > > > she died without a whisper.
            > > > >
            > > > > There were three of us this morning
            > > > > I'm the only one this evening
            > > > > but I must go on;
            > > > > the frontiers are my prison.
            > > > >
            > > > > Oh, the wind, the wind is blowing,
            > > > > through the graves the wind is blowing,
            > > > > freedom soon will come;
            > > > > then we'll come from the shadows.
            > > > >
            > > > > Les Allemands étaient chez moi,
            > > > > ils me disent, "résigne toi,"
            > > > > mais je n'ai pas peur;
            > > > > j'ai repris mon arme.
            > > > > J'ai changé cent fois de nom,
            > > > > j'ai perdu femme et enfants
            > > > > mais j'ai tant d'amis;
            > > > > j'ai la France entière.
            > > > > Un vieil homme dans un grenier
            > > > > pour la nuit nous a caché,
            > > > > les Allemands l'ont pris;
            > > > > il est mort sans surprise.
            > > > >
            > > > > [The Germans were at my home
            > > > > They said, "Resigned yourself"
            > > > > But I am not afraid
            > > > > I have retaken my weapon
            > > > > I have changed names a hundred times
            > > > > I have lost wife and children
            > > > > But I have so many friends
            > > > > I have all of France
            > > > > An old man, in an attic
            > > > > Hid us for the night
            > > > > The Germans captured him
            > > > > He died without surprise.]
            > > > >
            > > > > Oh, the wind, the wind is blowing,
            > > > > through the graves the wind is blowing,
            > > > > freedom soon will come;
            > > > > then we'll come from the shadows.
            > > > >
            > > > >
            > ****************************************************************
            > > > >
            > > > >
            > > > > Tarjei
            > > > > http://uncletaz.com/
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
          • epwijnantsresearch
            There are two other books I maybe should mention that I belief justify the above titel; Winter, Jay, Geoffrey Parker, and Mary R. Habeck, eds. 2ooo. Zuber,
            Message 5 of 13 , May 28, 2004
            • 0 Attachment
              There are two other books I maybe should mention that I belief
              justify the above titel; Winter, Jay, Geoffrey Parker, and Mary R.
              Habeck, eds. 2ooo. Zuber, Terence. Inventing the Schlieffen Plan:
              German German War Planning -1914 (2003)

              These two books describe extensively how Germany justified itself on
              August 3, two days after declaring war, by publishing
              documents, "half of the thirty documents were blatant forgeries."
              And how even in the decades after the war describe, how in Germany,
              evidence tended to be destroyed rather than recovered, and even if
              recovered, rewritten or restructured. Moreover, the authorities
              under successive German regimes up to and including the Nazi
              government carried on a massive disinformation campaign which has
              been described by Holger H. Herwig in detail in his essay "Clio
              Deceived" published in the first of the two books.

              It shows how the diaries of Kurt Riezler, private secretary to the
              German Chancellor, illustrate the difficulties that research
              scholars face. Riezler died after leaving instructions that his
              diaries should be destroyed. The personal papers of Bethmann had
              been removed or destroyed a decade or two earlier. After many
              maneuvers and arguments, the Riezler papers were rescued. But
              examination showed that while the diaries before and after the
              summer Of 1914 were in small exercise books, the key months of July
              and August were recorded, instead, on loose paper and in another
              manner, strongly suggesting that these centrally relevant sections
              had been rewritten-and had been substituted for the original. The
              papers of Mueller, head of the Kaiser's Naval Cabinet, though they
              survived, were expurgated.

              And how on orders of the Germany Government destroyed all records
              of telephone conversations and notes of other verbal communications
              are missing for the period in question from the German foreign
              office. On the German side the two key turning points were the July
              5 conversations with the Austrians, resulting in the "blank check,"
              and the discussions among German leaders the week of July 27 that
              led to the decision to go to war. All records of both are missing
              from the foreign office. Missing, too, is told by a leading
              researcher in this field, Imanuel Geiss, are all records of the
              Kaiser's conversations with military and political leaders during
              July. For that matter, there are no records of Germany's
              conversations in Berlin with foreign powers.

              But there is more, not only was the German Government from the
              beginning of the war actively involved with willfully (a conspiracy
              indeed ?) shredding and falsifying documents that could tell the
              truth about who started the War. The German Foreign Office also
              wanted to create a propaganda story a convenient
              preferable `conspiracy theory they could put the blame on for WWI .
              So the German Foreign Office approached one of the most popular
              writers at the time, and purveyor of mysticism in the German
              language: Gustav Meyrink.

              So when Pastor Carl Vogl visited Meyrink he found his worktable
              covered with books on Freemasonry. The novelist told him that he had
              been summoned to the Foreign Office in Berlin, where he had met an
              embassy official and two secret agents, including the former
              confessor of the queen of Bavaria. He was asked to write a novel
              that would blame the Freemasons for the outbreak of the war. It was
              to be translated into English and Swedish; 500,000 copies were to be
              printed; and it was to be sent all over the world. Meyrink was
              presented with a pile of books for his research, but he protested
              that possibly Gustav Frenssen or Ludwig Ganghofer would do the job
              better. This suggestion of the two fervently Germanic novelists must
              have seemed faintly ironical, for Meyrink had even published a
              parody of Frenssen's exaggerated celebration of peasant wisdom. He
              was informed that if the tale was told by him it would be much more
              believable; and he took on the task. Pastor Vogl in fact reports in
              his "Aufzeichnungen Und Bekentnisse" (Vienna/Berlin) that he had
              held the Foreign Office instructions for the book in his hands:
              Meyrink had been directed to lay the blame for the war especially on
              Entente Masonry.

              And not to suggest any direct connection here, it is at least
              ironic, that Rudolf Steiner (who was receiving a lot of money from
              Elisa von Moltke to build the Goetheanum) was to pay for the
              publishing costs of Karl Heise's "Entente Fremaurerei", and also
              wrote the anonymous foreword for it.

              With peace and respect,
              Eric

              --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "epwijnantsresearch"
              <epwijnantsresearch@y...> wrote:
              > The Kaiser and many of his men were certain that none of the other
              > Great Powers of Europe would intervene to halt the hoped for the
              > expected Austrian strike. They committed to ward off France and
              > Russia in the firm belief that they never would be called upon to
              do
              > so. They were signing a check that they believed would never be
              > cashed.
              >
              > On July 24, Austria's Foreign Minister Count Leopold von Berchtold
              > met with the Russian charge d'affaires, Count Kudashev in Vienna ,
              > and delivered a soothing message: "nothing was further from our
              > thoughts than the 'Wish to humiliate Serbia"; and the Dual
              > Monarchy "did not aim at a territorial gain but merely y at the
              > preservation of the status quo."
              >
              > Literally, Berchtold -,was telling the truth: Vienna did not
              intend
              > to annex Serbia; it ruled too many Slavs already. But he was
              > deliberately misleading: Austria-Hungary, according to Berchtold's
              > chief aide at the foreign office, intended to partition Serbia but
              > to take no part of Serbia for itself.
              >
              > In fact Berchtold was urged by Germany's foreign Minister Jagow in
              > Berlin to declare war immediately, before the other powers stepped
              > in to impose a peace settlement. In turn, the Austro-Hungarian
              > foreign minister attempted to put pressure on his army chief,
              > Conrad, who had been a persistent advocate of going to war in the
              > past. Conrad claimed not to be ready. In Conrad's account:
              >
              > BERCHTOLD:We should like to deliver the declaration of war on
              Serbia
              > as soon as possible so as to put an end to diverse influences.
              When
              > do you want the declaration of war?
              >
              > CONRAD: Only when we have progressed far enough for operations to
              > begin immediately-on approximately August 12.
              >
              > BERCHTOLD: The diplomatic situation will not hold as long as that.
              >
              > Germany's military leaders had focused on blaming Russia for the
              > European conflict they foresaw and regarded as inevitable. This
              had
              > been, and remained, Moltke's line. It was echoed on July 27 by
              > Admiral von Mueller: Germany should, he told his diary, "remain
              calm
              > to allow Russia to put herself in the wrong, but then not to
              shrink
              > from war if it were inevitable." Germany's prime minister Bethmann
              > agreed with the military on this: "In all events Russia must
              > ruthlessly be put in the wrong," he told WilhelmII.
              >
              > The July crisis, as Moltke saw it, had evolved, happily for
              Germany,
              > in such a way as to place it in a "singularly favorable
              situation."
              > Harvests were in, the annual training of recruits had finished,
              and
              > Russia and France would not be really ready for two years. Austria
              > had put itself in a position such that it could not help fighting
              at
              > Germany's side, and that was absolutely vital. As Moltke summed it
              > up: "we shall never hit it again so well as we do now."
              >
              > At the same time British prime minister Herbert Asquith wrote in
              > confidence to his friend Venetia Stanley "It is one of the ironies
              > of the case,that we being the only Power who has made so much as a
              > constructive suggestion on the direction of peace, are blamed by
              > both Germany and Russia for causing the outbreak of war. Germany
              > says: 'if you say you will be neutral, France and Russia wouldn't
              > dare to fight,' and Russia says: 'if you boldly declare that you
              > will side with us, Germany and Austria will at once draw in their
              > homs. Neither of course is true."
              >
              > And France even the day War with Serbia broke knew nothing of
              the
              > war crisis; the news of which everyone spoke was that Mme Caillaux
              > had been acquitted!
              >
              > A note on sources, David Fromkin in "Europe's Last Summer: Who
              > Started the Great War in 1914?"(2004) portrays Kaiser Wilhelm and
              > those of his subordinates who contravened him as crisis evolved is
              > especially relevant to understanding how German policy arrived at
              war
              > (past the who;e link in your browser);
              >
              > http://www.foreignaffairs.org/20040501fabook83336/david-
              > fromkin/europe-s-last-summer-who-started-the-great-war-in-1914.html
              >
              >
              > He describes how high officials in the German and Austrian
              > governments conspired to wage two wars of aggression - Austria
              > against Serbia, Germany against Russia. These officials bear sole
              > responsibility for the "Great War". This plot was formed well
              before
              > June 28th, 1914. The date served only as a pretext for the
              violence
              > previously planned by these two powers.
              >
              > He admits the Kaiser did not want the war and was overuled by his
              > Army chief of Staff Moltke. German General Helmuth von Moltke (the
              > younger) wanted Germany to confront Russia in war earlier rather
              > than later because he perceived that Russia's French funded
              > industrialization would gradually displace Germany as the leading
              > military power in the world.
              >
              > And as expected, Russia backed up Serbia and mobilized, next
              > Germany backed up their ally Austria by demanding Russia cease and
              > desist. France backed up Russia Germany declared war on Russia and
              > France and invaded so called neutral Belgium. Great Britain
              declared
              > war on Germany and so it was ignited.
              >
              > I would say however that as Fromklin mentions himself , his an
              > extensive analysis yet most of the original documents he referred
              to
              > should be viewed in Annika Mombauer, Helmuth Von Moltke and the
              > Origins of the First World War (2001).
              >
              > Also Fronmklin strength is that his analyses only concerns who
              > started the War, and why.
              >
              > But as one critique stated; " Fromkin's most interesting point
              is
              > that the war was actually two conflicts: one a local Austrian-
              > Serbian conflict that was quickly forgotten by everyone else, and
              > the second a long planned move by the Germans to prevent what they
              > saw as their inevitable decline in Europe. In light of recent
              events
              > in Iraq, Fromkin also does a good job of explaining how carefully
              > laid plans can spin out of control and turn what was planned to be
              a
              > short war into a long drawn out quagmire. It will be satisfactory
              > for those who want or need a quick look at the beginning of the
              > Great War. Those who desire a more indepth study should refer to
              the
              > classic: Barbara Tuchman's The Guns of August." I agree with that
              > and also read Barbara Tuchman's book.
              >
              > But for those interested in Moltke I would recommend Fromklin and
              > the documents published in Mombauer's book are indeed sufficient.
              >
              > If notting else, pls if you chosse to offer counterevidence do so
              by
              > at least quoting documents in Mombauer, Helmuth Von Moltke and
              the
              > Origins of the First World War (2001), it can be viewed and copied
              > in any major library near you.
              >
              > With peace and respect,
              > Eric
              > --- In
              anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "epwijnantsresearch"
              > <epwijnantsresearch@y...> wrote:
              > > Early in the morning of Monday, July 6, before embarking, the
              > > German Kaiser sent for several officers to deliver messages for
              > him.
              > > Admiral Eduard von Capelle, the deputy of Tirpitz, received a
              > phone
              > > call between 7:oo and 8:oo a.m. summoning him. He found Wilhelm
              in
              > > the garden of his palace. Capelle recalled: "The Emperor walked
              up
              > > and down with me for a short while and told me briefly of the
              > > occurrences of the day before"-the blank check to Austria (to
              > > protect it in case Russia would attack whenever the Austrians
              > > decided to take action against Serbia) , an account of which
              > Capelle
              > > apparently was to give to Tirpitz.
              > >
              > > The Kaiser "did not believe in serious warlike developments.
              > > According to his view, the Czar would not in this case place
              > himself
              > > on the side of regicides. Besides that, Russia and France were
              not
              > > prepared for war. (The Emperor did not mention England.) On the
              > > advice of the Imperial Chancellor, he was going to start on the
              > > journey to Northland, in order not to create any
              > > uneasiness."(Kautzky's Memoirs ,1924 p. 47, )
              > > A similar message was sent by the hand of a naval officer,
              Captain
              > > Zenker, to his superiors. "His Majesty had promised" to protect
              > > Austria if Russia interfered "but did not believe that Russia
              > would
              > > enter the lists for Serbia, which had stained itself by an
              > > assassination. France, too, would scarcely let it come to war,
              as
              > it
              > > lacked the heavy artillery for the field armies. Yet though a
              war
              > > against Russia-France was not probable, nevertheless the
              > possibility
              > > of such a war must be borne in mind from a military point of
              > > view."(See Zenker's Memoirs p.49.)
              > >
              > > In fact as clearly shown by David Fromkin in "Europe's Last
              > Summer:
              > > Who Started the Great War in 1914?"(2004), Austria-Hungary lied
              > when
              > > it claimed to be striking back for the murder of the Archduke.
              In
              > > fact, the killings at Sarajevo had relatively little to do with
              > the
              > > Hapsburg desire to crush Serbia. What gave away Austria's lie in
              > the
              > > first instance was that it did not attack immediately, which is
              > what
              > > one does when one strikes out in anger or in self-defense.
              > > Alternativelv, one would pursue a full judicial inquiry to its
              > > conclusion, and then publish its results to the world, which
              > Vienna
              > > lacked the patience to do.
              > >
              > > The fact-known now, though not then-that the memo submitted to
              the
              > > Kaiser in support of the plan to go to war was the same memo
              that
              > > had been prepared before the murders in Sarajevo shows hat it
              did
              > > not arise from that event.
              > >
              > > The Austrian ambassador in Berlin brought a copy of the
              ultimatum
              > in
              > > final form the way it was going to be send to Serbia to Gotlieb
              > von
              > > Jagow Germany's Foreign Minister in Berlin, later lied and
              denied
              > > having seen it before it went out. (However, in an interview on
              > > September 17, 1916, with American joumalist William Bullitt, he
              > > admitted that he had seen the ultimatum before it was sent. And
              > > Zimmermann, Jagow's number two, told a coleague (August 11, 19
              17)
              > > that "it is true that we received the Serbian ultimatum about
              > twelve
              > > hours before it was presented." Zimmermann wrote that it was
              > > pointless to keep on lying about it, since it "cannot be kept
              > secret
              > > forever.")
              > >
              > > Jagow rechecked calculations and discovered that the Austrians
              > > planned to present the ultimatum an hour too soon while the
              French
              > > leaders were still in Russia. A panicked effort by Hapsburg
              > > officialdom, alerted by Jagow, resulted in moving that ultimatum
              > > time to an hour later.
              > >
              > > Certainly I am open if someone can disproof any of the above to
              > > change my mind. I am willing to go wherever the evidence takes
              me.
              > >
              > > With peace and respect,
              > > Eric
              > > --- In
              > anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "epwijnantsresearch"
              > > <epwijnantsresearch@y...> wrote:
              > > > As shown by available documents, Moltke took the lead in
              > advancing
              > > > two propositions: first, that the alliance with Austria was
              > > > absolutely central to Germany and had to be given top
              priority;
              > > and
              > > > second, that war against the Triple Entente-Britain, France,
              and
              > > > Russia, three countries that had pledged mutual friendship-was
              > > bound
              > > > to break out not much later than 19 16 or 19 17, and that
              > Germany
              > > > would lose the war unless it launched a preventive attack
              > > > immediately. Certain that war would come, Moltke wanted it
              > sooner
              > > > rather than later. He wanted it even though, like many of his
              > > > colleagues, he feared that it would bring European
              civilization
              > to
              > > > an end.
              > > >
              > > > Instead of secondary opinions therefore, I think one should
              > start
              > > > with the original documents of the German and Austrian
              > government
              > > > itself at the time.
              > > >
              > > > First, regarding the Sarajewo incident often explained as the
              > > start
              > > > of WWI, evidence shows that the Emperor, though horrified by
              the
              > > > crime itself, was not unhappy that Franz Ferdinand was out of
              > the
              > > > way. He had not wanted to have the Archduke succeed him on the
              > > > throne. "For me, it is a great worry less," he told his
              daughter
              > > in
              > > > speaking of the Archduke's death. To a close aide he
              > > confided: "God
              > > > will not be mocked. A higher power had put back the order I
              > > couldn't
              > > > maintain." Even Berchtold noted in his diary that during the
              > first
              > > > cabinet meeting after the assassination there was "yes,
              > > > consternation and indignation, but also a certain easing of
              > mood."
              > > >
              > > > President Poincare of France was at the Longchamps racetrack
              > when
              > > > news of the Sarajevo killings was brought to him. He remained
              to
              > > see
              > > > the end of the races. He then went about his usual routine.
              > Paris
              > > > was unaffected.
              > > >
              > > > In the spring of 1914, Moltke held talks with Gottlieb von
              > > Jagow,
              > > > Germany's foreign minister. Jagow noted that Moltke told him
              > that
              > > in
              > > > two or three years the "military superiority of our enemies
              > > > would ... be so great that he did not know how he could
              overcome
              > > > them. Today we would still be a match for them. In his opinion
              > > there
              > > > was no alternative to making preventive war in order to defeat
              > the
              > > > enemy while there was still a chance of victory. The Chief of
              > the
              > > > General Staff therefore proposed that I should conduct a
              policy
              > > with
              > > > the aim of provoking a war in the near future."
              > > >
              > > > Moltke feared that Germans, especially Prussian Germans,
              would
              > > > eventually be overwhelmed by the sheer number of Slavs unless
              > > action
              > > > was taken promptly. He often had urged starting a war against
              > > > Russia, before the Czar modernized and rearmed his empire. Yet
              > > > Moltke also foresaw that in the modem age a war among Great
              > Powers
              > > > would destroy Europe.
              > > >
              > > > Until April 1913, Germany had an alternative war plan to wage
              > war
              > > > against Russia only. No longer was that true. Moltke had his
              > > general
              > > > staff prepare a current war plan in I913-14 to deal with one
              > > > eventuality only: a two-front war against France and Russia.
              He
              > > had
              > > > good reason to keep details of the plan a closely held secret.
              > > >
              > > > With peace and respect,
              > > >
              > >
              >
              > > Eric
              > > >
              > > > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "VALENTINA
              > > BRUNETTI"
              > > > <okcgbr@t...> wrote:
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > > : Friday, May 28, 2004 5:24 AM
              > > > > Subject: [anthroposophy_tomorrow] Re: Code poem for the
              French
              > > > resistance
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > > What is interresting for those who have read "Light for the
              New
              > > > > Millennium",
              > > > > that von Moltke in fact is one of the two people
              > > > > responsible for starting WWI.
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > > Hi,
              > > > > having read "Light..." I cannot agree at all with this
              > > stateement.
              > > > Von
              > > > > Moltke was NOT responsible for anything about the start of
              the
              > > > war. He was
              > > > > only a soldier: the responsibility,a s Steiner said, did
              fall
              > > on
              > > > the heads
              > > > > of those "30 or 40 people" , most of the them politicians
              and
              > > > most of them
              > > > > Westerners who were so "darkened inside"to be unable to stop
              > the
              > > > run to the
              > > > > Bloodbath. Von Moltke was also betrayed by his right hand
              > under-
              > > > commander
              > > > > who dis not follow his orders just causing the weakening of
              > > German
              > > > troops at
              > > > > the Marna's battlefields....
              > > > > (When we'll be able to understand that the Contemporary
              Age's
              > > > disaster has
              > > > > its roots into Central Europe's defeat in WW 1 we get a step
              > > > ahead!)
              > > > >
              > > > > Andrea
              > > > >
              > > > > Although Steiner didn't seem to be
              > > > > aware of that;
              > http://www.monju.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/index3d.htm
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, Tarjei Straume
              > > > > <cyberelf@c...> wrote:
              > > > > > At 23:58 27.05.2004, Deborah wrote:
              > > > > >
              > > > > > >Wonderful Yeats poem, Bryan--thank you for posting it. I
              > find
              > > > > some
              > > > > > >small comfort in thinking that soldiers (of any
              > nationality)
              > > who
              > > > > are
              > > > > > >slain with such idealism in their hearts must surely be
              > > honored
              > > > > by the
              > > > > > >spiritual world upon crossing over.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Those were the thoughts of Rudolf Steiner too, during WW 1,
              > > > > although the
              > > > > > war was totally absurd and meaningless. I have some very
              > > > different
              > > > > thoughts
              > > > > > about this anno 2004 that I've been carrying with me since
              > the
              > > > > sixties, but
              > > > > > they will have to wait...
              > > > > >
              > > > > > >Here's my offering to those everywhere who must
              > > fight..........
              > > > > > >Deborah
              > > > > > >
              > > > > > >
              > > > > > > Code Poem for the French Resistance
              > > > > > >
              > > > > > >The life that I have is all that I have,
              > > > > > >And the life that I have is yours.
              > > > > > >The love that I have of the life that I have
              > > > > > >Is yours and yours and yours.
              > > > > > >
              > > > > > >A sleep I shall have
              > > > > > >A rest I shall have,
              > > > > > >Yet death will be but a pause,
              > > > > > >For the peace of my years in the long green grass
              > > > > > >Will be yours and yours and yours.
              > > > > > >
              > > > > > > --Leo Marks
              > > > > > > (1920 -- )
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Leonard Cohen has a beautiful song about the French
              > resistance:
              > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > ****************************************************************
              > > > > >
              > > > > > A PARTISAN
              > > > > >
              > > > > > When they poured across the border
              > > > > > I was cautioned to surrender,
              > > > > > this I could not do;
              > > > > > I took my gun and vanished.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > I have changed my name so often,
              > > > > > I've lost my wife and children
              > > > > > but I have many friends,
              > > > > > and some of them are with me.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > An old woman gave us shelter,
              > > > > > kept us hidden in the garret,
              > > > > > then the soldiers came;
              > > > > > she died without a whisper.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > There were three of us this morning
              > > > > > I'm the only one this evening
              > > > > > but I must go on;
              > > > > > the frontiers are my prison.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Oh, the wind, the wind is blowing,
              > > > > > through the graves the wind is blowing,
              > > > > > freedom soon will come;
              > > > > > then we'll come from the shadows.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Les Allemands étaient chez moi,
              > > > > > ils me disent, "résigne toi,"
              > > > > > mais je n'ai pas peur;
              > > > > > j'ai repris mon arme.
              > > > > > J'ai changé cent fois de nom,
              > > > > > j'ai perdu femme et enfants
              > > > > > mais j'ai tant d'amis;
              > > > > > j'ai la France entière.
              > > > > > Un vieil homme dans un grenier
              > > > > > pour la nuit nous a caché,
              > > > > > les Allemands l'ont pris;
              > > > > > il est mort sans surprise.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > [The Germans were at my home
              > > > > > They said, "Resigned yourself"
              > > > > > But I am not afraid
              > > > > > I have retaken my weapon
              > > > > > I have changed names a hundred times
              > > > > > I have lost wife and children
              > > > > > But I have so many friends
              > > > > > I have all of France
              > > > > > An old man, in an attic
              > > > > > Hid us for the night
              > > > > > The Germans captured him
              > > > > > He died without surprise.]
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Oh, the wind, the wind is blowing,
              > > > > > through the graves the wind is blowing,
              > > > > > freedom soon will come;
              > > > > > then we'll come from the shadows.
              > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > ****************************************************************
              > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Tarjei
              > > > > > http://uncletaz.com/
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
            • dottie zold
              Eric? Certainly I am open if someone can disproof any of ... Hi Eric, What are you thinking others would like to change your mind about? And in your mind what
              Message 6 of 13 , May 28, 2004
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                Eric?
                Certainly I am open if someone can disproof any of
                > the above to
                > change my mind. I am willing to go wherever the
                > evidence takes me.

                Hi Eric,

                What are you thinking others would like to change your
                mind about? And in your mind what is the evidence
                pointing towards.

                Thanks,
                Dottie




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              • dottie zold
                Eric? And not to suggest any direct connection here, it is ... Eric, so you want to suggest that Dr. Steiner was involved in starting the war by not suggesting
                Message 7 of 13 , May 28, 2004
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                  Eric?
                  And not to suggest any direct connection here, it is
                  > at least
                  > ironic, that Rudolf Steiner (who was receiving a lot
                  > of money from
                  > Elisa von Moltke to build the Goetheanum) was to pay
                  > for the
                  > publishing costs of Karl Heise's "Entente
                  > Fremaurerei", and also
                  > wrote the anonymous foreword for it.

                  Eric, so you want to suggest that Dr. Steiner was
                  involved in starting the war by not suggesting it, so
                  it appears to me. Okay. Is this your point or is there
                  something else that might be missing?

                  Thanks,
                  Dottie




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                • epwijnantsresearch
                  dottie: Eric, so you want to suggest that Dr. Steiner was involved in starting the war by not suggesting it, so it appears to me. Is this what I wrote ? I
                  Message 8 of 13 , May 28, 2004
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                    dottie:"Eric, so you want to suggest that Dr. Steiner was
                    involved in starting the war by not suggesting it, so
                    it appears to me."

                    Is this what I wrote ? I don't think so.

                    But where did Steiner get these wild conspiracy theories from ?
                    Presuming you "read your Steiner" example "Zeitgeschichtliche
                    Betrachtungen" vol 1 and 2 ?

                    By the way what really I wrote is;
                    As shown by available documents, Moltke took the lead in advancing
                    two propositions: first, that the alliance with Austria was
                    absolutely central to Germany and had to be given top priority; and
                    second, that war against the Triple Entente-Britain, France, and
                    Russia, three countries that had pledged mutual friendship-was bound
                    to break out not much later than 19 16 or 19 17, and that Germany
                    would lose the war unless it launched a preventive attack
                    immediately. Certain that war would come, Moltke wanted it sooner
                    rather than later. He wanted it even though, like many of his
                    colleagues, he feared that it would bring European civilization to
                    an end.

                    Instead of secondary opinions therefore, I think one should start
                    with the original documents of the German and Austrian government
                    itself at the time.

                    First, regarding the Sarajewo incident often explained as the start
                    of WWI, evidence shows that the Emperor, though horrified by the
                    crime itself, was not unhappy that Franz Ferdinand was out of the
                    way. He had not wanted to have the Archduke succeed him on the
                    throne. "For me, it is a great worry less," he told his daughter in
                    speaking of the Archduke's death. To a close aide he confided: "God
                    will not be mocked. A higher power had put back the order I couldn't
                    maintain." Even Berchtold noted in his diary that during the first
                    cabinet meeting after the assassination there was "yes,
                    consternation and indignation, but also a certain easing of mood."

                    President Poincare of France was at the Longchamps racetrack when
                    news of the Sarajevo killings was brought to him. He remained to see
                    the end of the races. He then went about his usual routine. Paris
                    was unaffected.

                    In the spring of 1914, Moltke held talks with Gottlieb von Jagow,
                    Germany's foreign minister. Jagow noted that Moltke told him that in
                    two or three years the "military superiority of our enemies
                    would ... be so great that he did not know how he could overcome
                    them. Today we would still be a match for them. In his opinion there
                    was no alternative to making preventive war in order to defeat the
                    enemy while there was still a chance of victory. The Chief of the
                    General Staff therefore proposed that I should conduct a policy with
                    the aim of provoking a war in the near future."

                    Moltke feared that Germans, especially Prussian Germans, would
                    eventually be overwhelmed by the sheer number of Slavs unless action
                    was taken promptly. He often had urged starting a war against
                    Russia, before the Czar modernized and rearmed his empire. Yet
                    Moltke also foresaw that in the modem age a war among Great Powers
                    would destroy Europe.

                    Until April 1913, Germany had an alternative war plan to wage war
                    against Russia only. No longer was that true. Moltke had his general
                    staff prepare a current war plan in I913-14 to deal with one
                    eventuality only: a two-front war against France and Russia. He had
                    good reason to keep details of the plan a closely held secret.
                    Early in the morning of Monday, July 6, before embarking, the
                    German Kaiser sent for several officers to deliver messages for him.
                    Admiral Eduard von Capelle, the deputy of Tirpitz, received a phone
                    call between 7:oo and 8:oo a.m. summoning him. He found Wilhelm in
                    the garden of his palace. Capelle recalled: "The Emperor walked up
                    and down with me for a short while and told me briefly of the
                    occurrences of the day before"-the blank check to Austria (to
                    protect it in case Russia would attack whenever the Austrians
                    decided to take action against Serbia) , an account of which Capelle
                    apparently was to give to Tirpitz.

                    The Kaiser "did not believe in serious warlike developments.
                    According to his view, the Czar would not in this case place himself
                    on the side of regicides. Besides that, Russia and France were not
                    prepared for war. (The Emperor did not mention England.) On the
                    advice of the Imperial Chancellor, he was going to start on the
                    journey to Northland, in order not to create any
                    uneasiness."(Kautzky's Memoirs ,1924 p. 47, )
                    A similar message was sent by the hand of a naval officer, Captain
                    Zenker, to his superiors. "His Majesty had promised" to protect
                    Austria if Russia interfered "but did not believe that Russia would
                    enter the lists for Serbia, which had stained itself by an
                    assassination. France, too, would scarcely let it come to war, as it
                    lacked the heavy artillery for the field armies. Yet though a war
                    against Russia-France was not probable, nevertheless the possibility
                    of such a war must be borne in mind from a military point of
                    view."(See Zenker's Memoirs p.49.)

                    In fact as clearly shown by David Fromkin in "Europe's Last Summer:
                    Who Started the Great War in 1914?"(2004), Austria-Hungary lied when
                    it claimed to be striking back for the murder of the Archduke. In
                    fact, the killings at Sarajevo had relatively little to do with the
                    Hapsburg desire to crush Serbia. What gave away Austria's lie in the
                    first instance was that it did not attack immediately, which is what
                    one does when one strikes out in anger or in self-defense.
                    Alternativelv, one would pursue a full judicial inquiry to its
                    conclusion, and then publish its results to the world, which Vienna
                    lacked the patience to do.

                    The fact-known now, though not then-that the memo submitted to the
                    Kaiser in support of the plan to go to war was the same memo that
                    had been prepared before the murders in Sarajevo shows hat it did
                    not arise from that event.

                    The Austrian ambassador in Berlin brought a copy of the ultimatum in
                    final form the way it was going to be send to Serbia to Gotlieb von
                    Jagow Germany's Foreign Minister in Berlin, later lied and denied
                    having seen it before it went out. (However, in an interview on
                    September 17, 1916, with American joumalist William Bullitt, he
                    admitted that he had seen the ultimatum before it was sent. And
                    Zimmermann, Jagow's number two, told a coleague (August 11, 19 17)
                    that "it is true that we received the Serbian ultimatum about twelve
                    hours before it was presented." Zimmermann wrote that it was
                    pointless to keep on lying about it, since it "cannot be kept secret
                    forever.")

                    Jagow rechecked calculations and discovered that the Austrians
                    planned to present the ultimatum an hour too soon while the French
                    leaders were still in Russia. A panicked effort by Hapsburg
                    officialdom, alerted by Jagow, resulted in moving that ultimatum
                    time to an hour later.

                    The Kaiser and many of his men were certain that none of the other
                    Great Powers of Europe would intervene to halt the hoped for the
                    expected Austrian strike. They committed to ward off France and
                    Russia in the firm belief that they never would be called upon to do
                    so. They were signing a check that they believed would never be
                    cashed.

                    On July 24, Austria's Foreign Minister Count Leopold von Berchtold
                    met with the Russian charge d'affaires, Count Kudashev in Vienna ,
                    and delivered a soothing message: "nothing was further from our
                    thoughts than the 'Wish to humiliate Serbia"; and the Dual
                    Monarchy "did not aim at a territorial gain but merely y at the
                    preservation of the status quo."

                    Literally, Berchtold -,was telling the truth: Vienna did not intend
                    to annex Serbia; it ruled too many Slavs already. But he was
                    deliberately misleading: Austria-Hungary, according to Berchtold's
                    chief aide at the foreign office, intended to partition Serbia but
                    to take no part of Serbia for itself.

                    In fact Berchtold was urged by Germany's foreign Minister Jagow in
                    Berlin to declare war immediately, before the other powers stepped
                    in to impose a peace settlement. In turn, the Austro-Hungarian
                    foreign minister attempted to put pressure on his army chief,
                    Conrad, who had been a persistent advocate of going to war in the
                    past. Conrad claimed not to be ready. In Conrad's account:

                    BERCHTOLD:We should like to deliver the declaration of war on Serbia
                    as soon as possible so as to put an end to diverse influences. When
                    do you want the declaration of war?

                    CONRAD: Only when we have progressed far enough for operations to
                    begin immediately-on approximately August 12.

                    BERCHTOLD: The diplomatic situation will not hold as long as that.

                    Germany's military leaders had focused on blaming Russia for the
                    European conflict they foresaw and regarded as inevitable. This had
                    been, and remained, Moltke's line. It was echoed on July 27 by
                    Admiral von Mueller: Germany should, he told his diary, "remain calm
                    to allow Russia to put herself in the wrong, but then not to shrink
                    from war if it were inevitable." Germany's prime minister Bethmann
                    agreed with the military on this: "In all events Russia must
                    ruthlessly be put in the wrong," he told WilhelmII.

                    The July crisis, as Moltke saw it, had evolved, happily for Germany,
                    in such a way as to place it in a "singularly favorable situation."
                    Harvests were in, the annual training of recruits had finished, and
                    Russia and France would not be really ready for two years. Austria
                    had put itself in a position such that it could not help fighting at
                    Germany's side, and that was absolutely vital. As Moltke summed it
                    up: "we shall never hit it again so well as we do now."

                    At the same time British prime minister Herbert Asquith wrote in
                    confidence to his friend Venetia Stanley "It is one of the ironies
                    of the case,that we being the only Power who has made so much as a
                    constructive suggestion on the direction of peace, are blamed by
                    both Germany and Russia for causing the outbreak of war. Germany
                    says: 'if you say you will be neutral, France and Russia wouldn't
                    dare to fight,' and Russia says: 'if you boldly declare that you
                    will side with us, Germany and Austria will at once draw in their
                    homs. Neither of course is true."

                    And France even the day War with Serbia broke knew nothing of the
                    war crisis; the news of which
                    A note on sources, David Fromkin in "Europe's Last Summer: Who
                    Started the Great War in 1914?"(2004) portrays Kaiser Wilhelm and
                    those of his subordinates who contravened him as crisis evolved is
                    especially relevant to understanding how German policy arrived at
                    war;

                    http://www.foreignaffairs.org/20040501fabook83336/david-
                    fromkin/europe-s-last-summer-who-started-the-great-war-in-1914.html


                    High officials in the German and Austrian governments conspired to
                    wage two wars of aggression - Austria against Serbia, Germany
                    against Russia. These officials bear sole responsibility for
                    the "Great War". This plot was formed well before June 28th, 1914.
                    The date served only as a pretext for the violence previously
                    planned by these two powers. He admits the Kaiser did not want the
                    war and was overuled by his Army chief of Staff Moltke. German
                    General Helmuth von Moltke (the younger) wanted Germany to confront
                    Russia in war earlier rather than later because he perceived that
                    Russia's French funded industrialization would gradually displace
                    Germany as the leading military power in the world.

                    And as expected, Russia backed up Serbia and mobilized, next
                    Germany backed up their ally Austria by demanding Russia cease and
                    desist. France backed up Russia Germany declared war on Russia and
                    France and invaded so called neutral Belgium. Great Britain declared
                    war on Germany and so it was ignited.

                    I would say however that as Fromklin mentions himself , his an
                    extensive analysis yet most of the original documents he referred to
                    should be viewed in Annika Mombauer, Helmuth Von Moltke and the
                    Origins of the First World War (2001).
                    Also Fronmklin strength is that his analyses only concerns who
                    started the War, and why.
                    But as one critique stated; " Fromkin's most interesting point is
                    that the war was actually two conflicts: one a local Austrian-
                    Serbian conflict that was quickly forgotten by everyone else, and
                    the second a long planned move by the Germans to prevent what they
                    saw as their inevitable decline in Europe. In light of recent events
                    in Iraq, Fromkin also does a good job of explaining how carefully
                    laid plans can spin out of control and turn what was planned to be a
                    short war into a long drawn out quagmire. It will be satisfactory
                    for those who want or need a quick look at the beginning of the
                    Great War. Those who desire a more indepth study should refer to the
                    classic: Barbara Tuchman's The Guns of August." I agree with that
                    and also read Barbara Tuchman's book.
                    But for those interested in Moltke I would recommend Fromklin and
                    the documents published in Mombauer's book are indeed sufficient.

                    But as one critique stated; " Fromkin's most interesting point is
                    that the war was actually two conflicts: one a local Austrian-
                    Serbian conflict that was quickly forgotten by everyone else, and
                    the second a long planned move by the Germans to prevent what they
                    saw as their inevitable decline in Europe. In light of recent events
                    in Iraq, Fromkin also does a good job of explaining how carefully
                    laid plans can spin out of control and turn what was planned to be a
                    short war into a long drawn out quagmire. It will be satisfactory
                    for those who want or need a quick look at the beginning of the
                    Great War. Those who desire a more indepth study should refer to the
                    classic: Barbara Tuchman's The Guns of August." I agree with that
                    and also read Barbara Tuchman's book.
                    Eric


                    --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, dottie zold
                    <dottie_z@y...> wrote:
                    > Eric?
                    > And not to suggest any direct connection here, it is
                    > > at least
                    > > ironic, that Rudolf Steiner (who was receiving a lot
                    > > of money from
                    > > Elisa von Moltke to build the Goetheanum) was to pay
                    > > for the
                    > > publishing costs of Karl Heise's "Entente
                    > > Fremaurerei", and also
                    > > wrote the anonymous foreword for it.
                    >
                    > Eric, so you want to suggest that Dr. Steiner was
                    > involved in starting the war by not suggesting it, so
                    > it appears to me. Okay. Is this your point or is there
                    > something else that might be missing?
                    >
                    > Thanks,
                    > Dottie
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > __________________________________
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                  • zapdingo
                    Just got this in my inbox. Thought of making you all aware of yet another serious threat to our health, mores and probably national security. Bryan 1. More
                    Message 9 of 13 , May 28, 2004
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                      Just got this in my inbox. Thought of making you all aware of yet another serious threat to our health, mores and probably national security.
                      Bryan
                       
                      1. More than 90 percent of convicted felons are bread users.
                      2. Fully HALF of all children who grow up in bread-consuming households score below average on standardized tests.
                      3. In the 18th century, when virtually all bread was baked in the home, the average life expectancy was less than 50 years; infant mortality rates were unacceptably high; many women died in childbirth; and diseases such as typhoid, yellow fever, and influenza ravaged whole nations.
                      4. More than 90 percent of violent crimes are committed within 24 hours of eating bread.
                      5. Bread is made from a substance called "dough." It has been proven that as little as one pound of dough can be used to suffocate a mouse. The average American eats more bread than that in one month!
                      6. Primitive tribal societies that have no bread exhibit a low incidence of cancer, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's disease, and osteoporosis.
                      7. Bread has been proven to be addictive. Subjects deprived of bread and given only water to eat begged for bread after as little as two days.
                      8. Bread is often a "gateway" food item, leading the user to "harder" items such as butter, jelly, peanut butter, and even
                      cold cuts.
                      9. Bread has been proven to absorb water. Since the human body is more than 90 percent water, it follows that eating bread could
                      lead to your body being taken over by this absorptive food product, turning you into a soggy, gooey bread-pudding person.
                      10. Newborn babies can choke on bread.
                      11. Bread is baked at temperatures as high as 400 degrees Fahrenheit! That kind of heat can kill an adult in less than one
                      minute.
                      12. Most American bread eaters are utterly unable to distinguish between significant scientific fact and meaningless statistical
                      babbling.

                      In light of these frightening statistics, we propose the following bread restrictions:
                      1. No sale of bread to minors. 
                      2. A nationwide "Just Say No To Toast" campaign, with complete celebrity TV spots and bumper stickers.
                      3. A 300 percent federal tax on all bread to pay for all the societal ills we might associate with bread.
                      4. No animal or human images, nor any primary colors (which may appeal to  children) may be used to promote bread usage.
                      5. The establishment of "Bread-free" zones around schools.


                       


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                    • zapdingo
                      Thanks for the beautiful poem, Deborah. Bryan ... Do you Yahoo!? Friends. Fun. Try the all-new Yahoo! Messenger
                      Message 10 of 13 , May 28, 2004
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                        Thanks for the beautiful poem, Deborah.
                        Bryan


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                      • zapdingo
                        This is a recent article from The Guardian newspaper: The costly fraud that is organic food Its main contribution will be to sustain poverty and malnutrition
                        Message 11 of 13 , May 28, 2004
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                          This is a recent article from The Guardian newspaper:
                           
                          The costly fraud that is organic food
                          Its main contribution will be to sustain poverty and malnutrition
                          Dick Taverne
                          Thursday May 06 2004

                           Organic farming is a billion-pound industry. It is promoted by a stream
                          of propaganda from green lobby groups, notably the Soil Association,
                          and subsidised by government. Supermarkets like it because premium prices
                          increase profits. Every lifestyle magazine regards organic food as
                          synonymous with healthy living and every TV chef tells us that organic food
                          tastes better. To question claims made by the organic lobby is not just
                          akin to doubting the virtues of motherhood, but to reveal indifference
                          to the poisoning of the nation and the fate of the planet, perhaps even
                          to be guilty of corruption by American multinationals and of support
                          for George Bush.

                          The organic movement was inspired by the mysticism of Rudolf Steiner,
                          who believed in planting according to the phases of the moon, enriching
                          the soil through cowhorns stuffed with entrails, and who taught that
                          chemical fertilisers damage the brain. It is based on the belief that
                          nature knows best and science is dangerous. 

                          The SA has argued that organic farming cannot be judged by scientific
                          criteria because "the current tools of scientific understanding are not
                          sufficiently developed" to measure its virtues. It seizes on any
                          findings, however flimsy, that seem to confirm its claims and dismisses any
                          contradictory evidence as irrelevant, prejudiced or influenced by the
                          biotechnology industry. 

                          It has bitterly denounced the Food Standards Agency, an impartial body
                          set up by government to safeguard our welfare, which refuses to endorse
                          the claims made for organic food. Only in January the agency declared
                          that "on the basis of currentevidence ... organic food is not
                          significantly different in terms of food safety and nutrition from food produced
                          conventionally". 

                          It is claimed that organic food is more natural and that its reliance
                          on natural chemicals makes it safer than food grown with the help of
                          synthetic ones. This is nonsense. There is nothing wholesome about natural
                          chemicals like ricin or aflatoxin or botulinum toxin, or especially
                          dangerous about synthetic chemicals like the sulphonamides, isoniazid that
                          cures TB, or the painkiller paracetamol. 

                          We are told we should eat organic food because pesticide residues harm
                          us. As the FSA has pointed out, there is a disparity between public
                          fears and the facts. Dietary contributions to cardiovascular disease and
                          cancer probably account for more than 100,000 deaths a year; food
                          poisoning for between 50 and 300. There are no known deaths from pesticide
                          residues (or GM foods). A cup of coffee contains natural carcinogens
                          equal to at least a year's worth of carcinogenic synthetic residues in the
                          diet. If people are worried about the effect of pesticides in farming
                          on wildlife or human health, they should promote pesticide-resistant GM
                          crops, which reduce their use. 

                          It is said that organic food tastes better. Yes, if it is fresh. But
                          blind tests have shown fresh organic food tastes no better than fresh
                          food grown conventionally. Furthermore, about 70% of organic food is
                          imported and is not fresh, and since it is imported by air, it is not
                          exactly environmentally friendly. 

                          It is said that organic farming benefits wildlife. True, many people
                          become organic farmers for environmental reasons, and achieve their aim.
                          But studies show that environmental effects depend on the style of
                          management, not the system of farming. In general, integrated farm
                          management achieves the best results. What is most beneficial to birds and
                          wildlife is low-till farming, which is made possible by cultivating GM
                          crops. Organic farmers depend on the plough, which disturbs the ecology of
                          the soil, releases more carbon dioxide, uses more fossil fuel and
                          drives out nesting birds. 

                          Even if most claims made for organic farming could be substantiated,
                          its main disadvantage is its inefficiency. Organic food costs more
                          because average yields are 20-50% lower than those from conventional farms.
                          Its inefficiency is highly relevant to the hungry and the poor. 

                          While there may be food surpluses in some areas, we need to treble food
                          production in the next 50 years to feed 3 billion extra people and meet
                          higher living standards at the same time. We face an increasing
                          shortage of water and of good agricultural land. In many places the only way
                          inefficient organic farmers can feed an expanding population is by
                          cutting down more tropical forest. Every form of technology that increases
                          efficiency in farming will therefore be needed to contribute to the
                          production of more food. 

                          What contribution can organic farming make? In the words of the Indian
                          biologist CJ Prakash, its only contribution to sustainable agriculture
                          will be "to sustain poverty and malnutrition". 

                          Lord Taverne is chair of Sense About Science, and author of The March
                          of Unreason, to be published in November 
                          dicktaverne@...    

                          Well, well, who better than a Lord Dick to tell us about those evil things that "sustain poverty"...
                           
                          Bryan

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                        • holderlin66
                          epwijnantsresearch wrote: First, regarding the Sarajewo incident often explained as the start of WWI, evidence shows that the Emperor, though horrified by the
                          Message 12 of 13 , Jun 30, 2004
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                            epwijnantsresearch wrote:

                            "First, regarding the Sarajewo incident often explained as the start
                            of WWI, evidence shows that the Emperor, though horrified by the
                            crime itself, was not unhappy that Franz Ferdinand was out of the
                            way. He had not wanted to have the Archduke succeed him on the
                            throne. "For me, it is a great worry less," he told his daughter in
                            speaking of the Archduke's death. To a close aide he confided: "God
                            will not be mocked. A higher power had put back the order I couldn't
                            maintain." Even Berchtold noted in his diary that during the first
                            cabinet meeting after the assassination there was "yes,
                            consternation and indignation, but also a certain easing of mood."

                            http://www.lewrockwell.com/buchanan/buchanan4.html

                            "June 28, the day in 2004 that the Americans transferred sovereignty
                            to Iraqis and proconsul Paul Bremer hastily departed Baghdad, is a
                            day freighted with historic significance.

                            On June 28, 1914, 90 years before, Serb nationalist Gavrilo Princip
                            fired the shots that killed the Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand
                            and led, five weeks later, to World War I.

                            On June 28, 1919, German representatives, their country under an
                            Allied starvation blockade, prostrate before a threat by Marshal
                            Foch to march on Berlin, signed the Versailles treaty that ended
                            World War I, and set the stage for Hitler and World War II. Seen as
                            an Allied triumph in 1919, Versailles proved a disaster.

                            Thus, it is a good time to attempt to draw up an interim profit-and-
                            loss statement of what President Bush has accomplished in what he
                            calls the "War on Terror." Who is winning this war?

                            To answer that question, we must first ask and answer antecedent
                            questions. What is the war about? What are we fighting for? Who,
                            exactly, is the enemy in this war? What is he fighting for?

                            [snip]

                            "Of late, the president appears to have begun to understand that our
                            presence is a primary cause of the war of resistance and that, when
                            this phase ends, the real war, the civil war to decide which Iraqis
                            rule in Iraq, begins. Will it be Iraqis who wish to belong to the
                            modern world? Or Iraqis who wish to be part of the anti-American
                            Islamic revolution?

                            War, Clausewitz reminded us, is but the extension of politics by
                            other means. All wars, even wars in which terror is the weapon of
                            choice of the enemy, are about, as Lenin said: "Who? Whom?" Who
                            shall rule whom? And even in an Arab world where monarchs and
                            autocrats now rule, the victors will be those who win the hearts and
                            minds of Arab peoples.

                            This is the war we are losing. And to win this struggle, the United
                            States needs to do three things that may go against the political
                            interests of both parties: Stand up for justice for the
                            Palestinians. Remove our imperial presence. Cease to intervene in
                            their internal affairs.

                            We Americans once stood for all that. And if we go only where we are
                            invited, we would be invited more often to come and help."

                            Bradford comments;

                            Today we can run a Star Chart of the founding of America. We can see
                            even days, and times and impacts of what a nation might face. George
                            Washington had a Pre-Cog experience at Valley Forge that revealed
                            the unfolding destiny of the U.S. in three mighty visions. What Star
                            configurations were sounding through the event that differ from the
                            30th to the 28th allows one to be curious about historical events.
                            The term Pre-Cog is a fancy term arising from "The Minority Report"
                            as in Pre-Cognition. Steiner was no stranger to Pre-Cog and trained
                            Thinking that leads to the higher aspects of Vision and
                            interconnectedness of Beings.

                            In updating discussions from the line of research that has happened
                            on this list, we see that not only do we encounter the lag time of
                            current exoteric thinkers but we also can see the interconnected
                            filiments of thought connected to our own recent Time Spirit
                            research. We haven't had anyone yet break down a Star chart of June
                            28th for the birth of Iraq. It could be done of course.

                            Yet we also look at Financial mass production and inundation of
                            markets as a Pre-Cog living reality, experienced in Goethe and
                            his "Sorcerer's Apprentice". We see Pre-Cog in George Washington's
                            Vision at Valley Forge. We also encounter Pre-Cog in Steiner's
                            reckoning of the date 1933. So regarding these inner capacities of
                            higher vision, what does that tell us of the construction of human
                            beings? Do we always need to debate whether Spiritual Science has
                            the most updated System of thinking since at least the Ancient
                            Greeks? Is the Science of the Spirit so out of touch?

                            To be leaders or hold the Michael insights ahead of the curve of the
                            Political thinking is also to recognize how and what aspects of
                            inspiration rain down into our sleeping and waking rhythms as human
                            beings. Are we listening to the Michael School? Do we translate
                            those delicate intuitions into here and now or leave them in the
                            land of vague and hazy and relegate trained higher schooling which
                            we are engaged in, as something so much less than world events?
                          • holderlin66
                            Published on Wednesday, June 30, 2004 by the San Francisco Chronicle Citizens of the World, Unite by Kim Cranston
                            Message 13 of 13 , Jul 1, 2004
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                              Published on Wednesday, June 30, 2004 by the San Francisco
                              Chronicle
                              Citizens of the World, Unite
                              by Kim Cranston

                              http://www.commondreams.org/views04/0630-06.htm

                              "As we witness the transfer of sovereignty in Iraq, I wonder what my
                              father, the late Sen. Alan Cranston, D-Calif., would have thought
                              about the situation there.

                              A few days before he passed away in December 2000, he completed a
                              book entitled "The Sovereignty Revolution." The book explored ways
                              humanity can effectively address global challenges, from climate
                              change to terrorism and genocide. He concluded that our concept of
                              sovereignty, which is "widely and unwisely thought . . . to mean
                              only national sovereignty," helped make the 20th century the
                              bloodiest in history. He argued humanity will not survive the next
                              century unless we revise our concept of sovereignty to acknowledge
                              the primacy of the individual and emphasize the importance of
                              strengthening transnational organizations and international law.

                              My father didn't live to witness the horrors of Sept. 11, 2001, or
                              the ensuing war on terrorism. But his book warned of a terrorist
                              attack on the United States, and specifically named Osama bin Laden
                              as a possible perpetrator. He believed such horrors are
                              preventable. "The answer," he wrote, "will likely be found to lie in
                              adding one more layer of citizenship -- world citizenship -- to the
                              national and lesser layers among which sovereignty is presently
                              dispersed. This would at long last enable individuals to act upon
                              and embrace not only their traditional national citizenship,
                              patriotism and allegiance, but also their global citizenship, their
                              planetary patriotism, their allegiance to humanity."

                              To be sure, my father was not calling for a world government, but
                              for something far more nuanced. He was calling for "the deliberate
                              pooling, through democratic processes of consent, of strictly
                              limited and carefully defined portions of the sovereignty of
                              individuals so as to obtain what cannot otherwise be had."


                              Previously commented on:

                              "Sovereignty in Iraq is a catch phrase, a lot of hot air meaning one
                              thing and one thing only, Karl Rove and Bush machine stay in power.
                              American Press is so Orwellian that they cannot just tell you the way
                              it really is. The way it really is, for Spiritual Science, is that
                              control over the Iraqi corporate state by the U.S. is not something
                              that will be withdrawn anytime soon.

                              Go ahead, tell me about Soverignty, get all warm and fuzzy about
                              Sovereignty for me. Sovereignty is where the I Am, free of egregorial
                              and elemental beasties, like briars, that lodged themselves in
                              Luciferic and Ahrimanic portions of the untransformed soul, can with
                              self conscious, self correction and esoteric discipline, look at
                              itself with objectivity.

                              Sovereignty is having an active conscience that has the mobility to
                              not be part of the Orders from above and military boyscout training
                              wheels that allows anti-human actions to betray exactly what Freedom
                              in the World and freedom for America used to stand for. Sovereignty
                              is not walking around taking orders from Judaism, Islam or phony
                              fundamental christian morons who either want Armageddon or revenge.

                              Sovereignty is putting a line item, line by line cost effective
                              breakdown of exactly what this is costing the U.S. and the world in
                              billions, aid to whole starving countries, to what schools, teachers
                              salaries, new energy research that shakes us free of oil; or, phony
                              homeland security itself could do with the wasted billions that serve
                              the darker instincts of failed patriotism and obvious demonic
                              political machinations. We can start there with Sovereignty. Now all
                              of this practical data is also occult schooling. Schooling that aims
                              at the Philosophy of Freedom training of knowing your motives and
                              using the great Greek method of esoteric discipline, known as Know
                              Thyself. Steiner gave that as a gift. What I bring here practical
                              common sense indications of understanding basic Ahrimanic
                              Symptomology."
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