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Re: Harry Potter and the Steiner Universe (was: WC Imbecil's hilarious ravings)

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  • ted.wrinch
    I was also pleased that he has the same great love of John Masefleld s The Box of Delights as I. It took me a decade to even begin to find the language to
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 12, 2012
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      I was also pleased that he has the same great love of John Masefleld's 'The Box of Delights' as I. It took me a decade to even begin to find the language to describe the genius of this book; but whatever I might say Garner says it better.

      T.

      Ted Wrinch

      --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "ted.wrinch" <ted.wrinch@...> wrote:
      >
      > "(From examples like this, the difference between real historians and charlatans should be obvious.)"
      >
      > As well as the difference between real scholars and charlatans. On which subject, I like this interview where the great Alan Garner - a mystically inclined Oxford educated classicist - elucidates on the nature of inspiration. Homer's 'Sing me, oh museĀ…" comes to mind.
      >
      > "From start to finish, I have no conscious control over shape or form or voice, although I know that every word has to fight to prove its need to exist. Subjectively, I record what I observe in the private cinema of the head, with the minimum interference. Subjectively, the book is a pre-existing, autocratic form, over which I have no control, nor should I have. A work of art is a product of the unconscious mind, and 'I' should not try to influence it. The intellect is a drudge that sharpens the focus and edits the shape when the text is out on the page. Then hindsight frequently presents me with alarming vistas. However, in the years of preparation before the projector starts to turn, I read an enormous amount of apparently disconnected material and make volumes of notes -- and scarcely ever refer to them afterwards. The formalizing and concentrating of the discipline of reading appears to be the essential act. I have now moved away from the question I can't answer. What may require to be said is that every piece of work arrives involuntarily. I glimpse a totality, but can't articulate what that is. What I can do is recognize the areas of concern in which I have to become proficient. Hence the eclectic reading and the notes."
      >
      > http://www.elimae.com/interviews/garner
      > T.
      > Ted Wrinch
      >
      >
      > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "elfuncle" <elfuncle@> wrote:
      > >
      > > I forgot to include Harry Potter, but just wait and see, I'll get around
      > > to that too. Eventually they'll boot me off, but it's fun as long as it
      > > lasts; playing with their heads is such a blast.
      > >
      > > I need to review the movie series first however. I've got them all on
      > > DVDs somewhere, but my inventory is so unkempt and disorganized (which
      > > makes me a lousy anthro, an antithesis to the German "Ordnung muss
      > > sein"). Joanne Rowling is an anthro-agent, a closet anthro, and by
      > > writing the best-selling book series in history (400 million copies
      > > sold), she's promoted the Steiner universe; all those kids flying around
      > > on broomsticks and playing with magic spells are typical examples of
      > > Waldorf students who have been brainwashed with anthroposophy by their
      > > teachers. How could I forget all that?? It fits in beautifully with
      > > flying saucers, you ain't seen nothin' yet ;)
      > >
      > > In his TTC lecture series Myth in Human History, history professor Grant
      > > L. Voth, Ph.D. applauds Rowling's work and says she has tapped into the
      > > real thing, genuine classic mythology at its best:
      > > "In our own lives, we are inundated by myths, and many modern
      > > myth-makers draw on older myths to structure and give meaning to their
      > > own stories. J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter series is one example,
      > > using materials from world mythology to provide the skeleton for the
      > > entire work. Harry's initial situation as an orphan living with the
      > > nasty Dursleys comes straight out of Otto Rank's "family
      > > romance," making Harry another version of the ancient hero. An
      > > analysis of Harry's career across the novels can also be described
      > > in terms of the stages of Joseph Campbell's monomyth, suggesting
      > > that Rowling drew on motifs and structures from myths as old as the
      > > human race itself."
      > > ( -- From Lecture 2: "The Continuing Importance of Myth")
      > > (From examples like this, the difference between real historians and
      > > charlatans should be obvious.)
      > >
      > > Tarjei
      > >
      > > P.S. About the former thread title: The word is imbecile, not imbecil. I
      > > appreciate the compliment though, as usual.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "elfuncle" <elfuncle@>
      > > wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Methinketh thou me underestimated hast, Phrank... Thou seest, these
      > > > ideas began to spin when I was writing "Star Trek and Anthroposophy" a
      > > > little while back. I thought Star Trek, Gulliver's Travels -- well,
      > > > Jonathan Swift was an early 18th century pagan Christian something or
      > > > other, something weird -- Superman and other comic books, flying
      > > saucers
      > > > and flying vegetables, Donald Duck maybe -- so I was thinking
      > > > biological farming and health food. That's when my new persona began
      > > to
      > > > develop, my new troll for Sugarland. Pagan mythology, feminism and so
      > > on
      > > > aggressively attacking the faith of the churches, this all began to
      > > come
      > > > together, but then I had to link it all to anti-Anthroposophy and pack
      > > > it in a disgruntled and confused Waldorf parent sort of context, and I
      > > > admit that's where I almost gave up, because it didn't wuite compute
      > > or
      > > > make sense at first. But then I smoked meself a couple of fat ones
      > > while
      > > > meditating very hard, so I eventually came up with something I thought
      > > > was a usable troll, but I do understand if you don't think so; I take
      > > no
      > > > offense from that, buddy.
      > > >
      > > > Tarjei
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "Frank Thomas Smith"
      > > > fts.trasla@ wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > If this is Father Tom, he's outdone even himself. Or maybe this guy
      > > is
      > > > real...have you ever thought of that, Phrank? Yeah, I guess he must
      > > be.
      > > > He's a laugh a minute. Get this:
      > > > >
      > > > > "*Steiner's Spiritual Atheism*
      > > > > Are steiner schools religious? Yes and no - and it is this what
      > > makes
      > > > them so powerful in this respect. There is undoubtedly always a
      > > Romantic
      > > > spirituality about it - but it presents itself as the destruction of
      > > the
      > > > standard Judeo-Christian tradition. The best way to describe this is
      > > > Neopaganism. It's by no means uncommon and also come in a modern
      > > > package:
      > > > >
      > > > > Many pagans in North America encounter the movement through their
      > > > > > involvement in other hobbies; particularly popular with U.S.
      > > Pagans
      > > > are > "golden age"-type pastimes such as the Society for Creative
      > > > Anachronism (SCA), *Star Trek* fandom, *Doctor Who* fandom and comic
      > > > book fandom. Other manners in which many North American pagans have
      > > got
      > > > involved with > the movement are through political and/or *ecological
      > > > activism, such as "vegetarian groups, health food stores" or feminist
      > > > university courses.*
      > > > > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neopaganism#Propagation
      > > > > >
      > > > > No, not even Tom or Tarjei...or me for that matter, could make that
      > > > up. Woody Allen maybe.
      > > > > Phrank
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
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