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  • ted.wrinch
    Roger Rawlings has expressed his views on what Christianity should be on his website and in the excerpt I posted recently that contained his ideas about
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 8, 2012
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      Roger Rawlings has expressed his views on what Christianity should be on his website and in the excerpt I posted recently that contained his ideas about Christmas. His views are narrow and ahistorical ones. If Der Staudi was a real historian, that knew anything about history, he would have been able to correct him. Steiner in the 1914 Vienna lectures I'm reading makes interesting mention of the German C18 pastor and 'theosophist' Oetinger. He says of him:

      "A beautiful statement is contained in the theosophical literature of the first half of the nineteenth century, a statement made by Oetinger, who lived at Murrhardt, in Wurtemburg, and who was so far advanced in his own spiritual development that at certain times he was able quite consciously to help spiritual beings, that is, souls who were not on the physical plane. He made the remarkable statement which is very beautiful and very true: `Nature and the form of nature is the aim of spiritual creative power."

      Wiki says of Oetinger:

      "He was born at Göppingen. He studied philosophy and theology at Tübingen(1722-1728), and was impressed by the works of Jakob Böhme. On the completion of his university course, Oetinger spent some years travelling. In 1730 he visited Count Zinzendorf at Herrnhut, remaining there some months as teacher of Hebrew and Greek. During his travels, in his eager search for knowledge, he made the acquaintance of mystics and separatists, Christiansand learned Jews, theologians and physicians alike. The Philadelphiansinfluenced him to accept apocatastasis, the belief that all people would eventually be saved; he wove this into his theological system, depending chiefly upon I Corinthians 15 and Ephesians 1:9-11.[1]

      After some delay he was ordained to the ministry, and held several pastorates (since 1738). While pastor (from 1746) at Walddorf near Tübingen, he studied alchemy and made many experiments, his idea being to use his knowledge for symbolic purposes. These practices exposed him to the attacks of persons who misunderstood him. "My religion," he once said, "is the parallelism of Nature and Grace." Oetinger translated a part of Emanuel Swedenborg's philosophy of heaven and earth, and added notes of his own. Eventually (1765/1766) he became prelate at Murrhardt, where he died."

      T.

      Ted Wrinch
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