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Re: [anthroposophy_tomorrow] Southern Cross Review Nr. 80

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  • Maurice McCarthy
    Frank There is a hyper-link typo on the index page http://southerncrossreview.org/80/critchley-eiro.html should be
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 2, 2012
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      Frank

      There is a hyper-link typo on the index page
      http://southerncrossreview.org/80/critchley-eiro.html

      should be
      http://southerncrossreview.org/80/critchley-euro.html

      Regards
      Moss
    • ted.wrinch
      That site has some great Emerson extracts too: Experience, from Essays: Second Series (1844) by Ralph Waldo Emerson (1)Where do we find ourselves? In a series
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 2, 2012
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        That site has some great Emerson extracts too:

        Experience, from Essays: Second Series (1844) by Ralph Waldo Emerson

        (1)Where do we find ourselves? In a series of which we do not know the extremes, and believe that it has none. We wake and find ourselves on a stair; there are stairs below us, which we seem to have ascended; there are stairs above us, many a one, which go upward and out of sight. But the Genius which, according to the old belief, stands at the door by which we enter, and gives us the lethe to drink, that we may tell no tales, mixed the cup too strongly, and we cannot shake off the lethargy now at noonday. Sleep lingers all our lifetime about our eyes, as night hovers all day in the boughs of the fir-tree. All things swim and glitter. Our life is not so much threatened as our perception. Ghostlike we glide through nature, and should not know our place again. Did our birth fall in some fit of indigence and frugality in nature, that she was so sparing of her fire and so liberal of her earth, that it appears to us that we lack the affirmative principle, and though we have health and reason, yet we have no superfluity of spirit for new creation? We have enough to live and bring the year about, but not an ounce to impart or to invest. Ah that our Genius were a little more of a genius! We are like millers on the lower levels of a stream, when the factories above them have exhausted the water. We too fancy that the upper people must have raised their dams.

        (2)If any of us knew what we were doing, or where we are going, then when we think we best know! We do not know today whether we are busy or idle. In times when we thought ourselves indolent, we have afterwards discovered, that much was accomplished, and much was begun in us. All our days are so unprofitable while they pass, that 'tis wonderful where or when we ever got anything of this which we call wisdom, poetry, virtue. We never got it on any dated calendar day. Some heavenly days must have been intercalated somewhere, like those that Hermes won with dice of the Moon, that Osiris might be born. It is said, all martyrdoms looked mean when they were suffered. Every ship is a romantic object, except that we sail in. Embark, and the romance quits our vessel, and hangs on every other sail in the horizon. Our life looks trivial, and we shun to record it. Men seem to have learned of the horizon the art of perpetual retreating and reference. `Yonder uplands are rich pasturage, and my neighbor has fertile meadow, but my field,' says the querulous farmer, `only holds the world together.' I quote another man's saying; unluckily, that other withdraws himself in the same way, and quotes me. 'Tis the trick of nature thus to degrade today; a good deal of buzz, and somewhere a result slipped magically in. Every roof is agreeable to the eye, until it is lifted; then we find tragedy and moaning women, and hard-eyed husbands, and deluges of lethe, and the men ask, `What's the news?' as if the old were so bad. How many individuals can we count in society? how many actions? how many opinions? So much of our time is preparation, so much is routine, and so much retrospect, that the pith of each man's genius contracts itself to a very few hours. The history of literature -- take the net result of Tiraboschi, Warton, or Schlegel, -- is a sum of very few ideas, and of very few original tales, -- all the rest being variation of these. So in this great society wide lying around us, a critical analysis would find very few spontaneous actions. It is almost all custom and gross sense. There are even few opinions, and these seem organic in the speakers, and do not disturb the universal necessity.

        ….
        (5)Dream delivers us to dream, and there is no end to illusion. Life is a train of moods like a string of beads, and, as we pass through them, they prove to be many-colored lenses which paint the world their own hue, and each shows only what lies in its focus. From the mountain you see the mountain. We animate what we can, and we see only what we animate. Nature and books belong to the eyes that see them. It depends on the mood of the man, whether he shall see the sunset or the fine poem. There are always sunsets, and there is always genius; but only a few hours so serene that we can relish nature or criticism. The more or less depends on structure or temperament. Temperament is the iron wire on which the beads are strung. Of what use is fortune or talent to a cold and defective nature? Who cares what sensibility or discrimination a man has at some time shown, if he falls asleep in his chair? or if he laugh and giggle? or if he apologize? or is affected with egotism? or thinks of his dollar? or cannot go by food? or has gotten a child in his boyhood? Of what use is genius, if the organ is too convex or too concave, and cannot find a focal distance within the actual horizon of human life? Of what use, if the brain is too cold or too hot, and the man does not care enough for results, to stimulate him to experiment, and hold him up in it? or if the web is too finely woven, too irritable by pleasure and pain, so that life stagnates from too much reception, without due outlet? Of what use to make heroic vows of amendment, if the same old law-breaker is to keep them? What cheer can the religious sentiment yield, when that is suspected to be secretly dependent on the seasons of the year, and the state of the blood? I knew a witty physician who found theology in the biliary duct, and used to affirm that if there was disease in the liver, the man became a Calvinist, and if that organ was sound, he became a Unitarian. Very mortifying is the reluctant experience that some unfriendly excess or imbecility neutralizes the promise of genius. We see young men who owe us a new world, so readily and lavishly they promise, but they never acquit the debt; they die young and dodge the account: or if they live, they lose themselves in the crowd.

        …


        http://moonchalice.com/emerson_experience.html

        T.

        Ted Wrinch

        --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "ted.wrinch" <ted.wrinch@...> wrote:
        >
        > Remarkably enough, I was just reading Plath's poetry and reviewing the Hughes' controversy. In case you're not aware, there's a big anthro inspired, interpretative site on her work that's very interesting:
        >
        > Sylvia Plath: Ego, Blood, and Spirit
        >
        > http://moonchalice.com/
        >
        >
        > T.
        >
        > Ted Wrinch
        >
        >
        > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "Frank Thomas Smith" <fts.trasla@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Dear Friends and Subscribers,
        > >
        > > Welcome to http://SouthernCrossReview.org Number 80 – the January-February 2012 issue.
        > >
        > > In the "Editor's Page" you will find our yearly Three Kings (Magi) tale, "whereas "Features" really features articles by Simon Critchley about the blindness of the so-called experts who dreamed up the sinking Euro, and by Rebecca Solnit about the Occupy Wall Street movement. Rebecca not only watches and writes, she participates! There is also an article from a local Argentine newspaper about a lady who is really doing something about children's hunger in her neighborhood.
        > >
        > > Fiction: Navigating the copyright laws, we offer two classics of short story fiction: J.D. Salinger's "From Esmé with Love and Squalor" and Jorge Luis Borges' "The Gospel According to Mark" - the latter in Spanish and English.
        > >
        > > In the "Anthroposophy" Section, we continue the translation of Rudolf Steiner's "First Class" lectures and the "Karmic Relations" lectures.
        > >
        > > Poetry: A shocker by Sylvia Plath and a squirmer by her erstwhile husband, Ted Hughes.
        > >
        > > Enjoy!
        > >
        > > --
        > > Frank Thomas Smith
        > > www.SouthernCrossReview.org
        > >
        >
      • Frank Thomas Smith
        Thanks Moss, fixed now. Frank
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 2, 2012
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          Thanks Moss, fixed now.
          Frank
          --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, Maurice McCarthy <manselton@...> wrote:
          >
          > Frank
          >
          > There is a hyper-link typo on the index page
          > http://southerncrossreview.org/80/critchley-eiro.html
          >
          > should be
          > http://southerncrossreview.org/80/critchley-euro.html
          >
          > Regards
          > Moss
          >
        • Frank Thomas Smith
          ... I ll have to take a long look at that. Scimming, it seems he/she equates Plath s Daddy with God the Father. Wheh! Frank
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 2, 2012
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            --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "ted.wrinch" <ted.wrinch@...> wrote:
            >
            > Remarkably enough, I was just reading Plath's poetry and reviewing the Hughes' controversy. In case you're not aware, there's a big anthro inspired, interpretative site on her work that's very interesting:
            >
            > Sylvia Plath: Ego, Blood, and Spirit
            >
            > http://moonchalice.com/


            I'll have to take a long look at that. Scimming, it seems he/she equates Plath's "Daddy" with God the Father. Wheh!
            Frank

            _________
            >
            >
            > T.
            >
            > Ted Wrinch
            >
            >
            > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "Frank Thomas Smith" <fts.trasla@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Dear Friends and Subscribers,
            > >
            > > Welcome to http://SouthernCrossReview.org Number 80 – the January-February 2012 issue.
            > >
            > > In the "Editor's Page" you will find our yearly Three Kings (Magi) tale, "whereas "Features" really features articles by Simon Critchley about the blindness of the so-called experts who dreamed up the sinking Euro, and by Rebecca Solnit about the Occupy Wall Street movement. Rebecca not only watches and writes, she participates! There is also an article from a local Argentine newspaper about a lady who is really doing something about children's hunger in her neighborhood.
            > >
            > > Fiction: Navigating the copyright laws, we offer two classics of short story fiction: J.D. Salinger's "From Esmé with Love and Squalor" and Jorge Luis Borges' "The Gospel According to Mark" - the latter in Spanish and English.
            > >
            > > In the "Anthroposophy" Section, we continue the translation of Rudolf Steiner's "First Class" lectures and the "Karmic Relations" lectures.
            > >
            > > Poetry: A shocker by Sylvia Plath and a squirmer by her erstwhile husband, Ted Hughes.
            > >
            > > Enjoy!
            > >
            > > --
            > > Frank Thomas Smith
            > > www.SouthernCrossReview.org
            > >
            >
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