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Re: Once Upon A Time...

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  • ted.wrinch
    Tres bien, Jean-Marc! In a posting on WC, circa 06 - so long ago now! - you apologised for your poor English . From what I ve seen your English has always
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 1, 2012
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      Tres bien, Jean-Marc!

      In a posting on WC, circa '06 - so long ago now! - you apologised for your 'poor English'. From what I've seen your English has always been good and is excellent in this piece!

      You labelled Walden as having 'AIDS' - acquired intellectual deficiency syndrome - in a later posting on WC. An accurate description and many have said equivalent in other words. A question that arises is what he's doing on the list. He doesn't know much about Steiner or spirituality (Charlotte gently rebuked him on the latter, which he didn't notice) or much else he comments on, beyond sport. He claims to be there to learn, but appears to have learnt little in the half decade of the list's existence.

      I've wondered why some of the others are there too - for some, like Pete K and Roger, it's pretty obvious that they are there because they have hatreds to express. Diana, who seems to have little to contribute, is a strange case. We know she's an editor and so spends her day working with the word. This can be a labour of love for those that enjoy helping talented people express their potential, but it can also be a frustrating, narrow activity that cramps one's own creativity and makes one feel smaller than those one serves. My guess is that Diana suffers from the latter; this could explain her need to emulate Der Staudi's style of argument and mocking academic superiority. But this is really a waste of her time and what she ought to do is to find a creative outlet for her energies. Her last post showed a degree of mental unbalance (the section on my censoring by Der Staudi was quite unhinged) which suggests that that list isn't a healthy place for her; from an anthro POV, it looks like her luciferic double is getting the better of her.

      It's always been apparent to me that Dugan suffers from scientism and is there mainly to attack the science.

      Der Staudi's main reason for being there appears to be because 3-folding provides a competitor vision of social reformation to his own. But, perhaps subconsciously, he knows that his own isn't viable (capitalism will never be replaced) and so he figures that it's best to try and attack Steiner intellectually.

      I also came across again the infamous (to me) Der Staudi posting on Ostwald, Steiner and materialism from 4.5 years ago, where he makes the lazily polemical claim that Steiner's understanding of materialism was 'inconsistent' (message 393). The basis of his claim was his fatally compromised statement:

      "Steiner proudly points to Ostwald as a prominent scientist who called for overcoming materialism. In these contexts, Ostwald
      appears as a kind of pioneer of anti-materialism from within the scientific establishment, one whom Steiner gladly invokes to endorse Steiner's own
      favored views."

      He never successfully defended this formulation in his debate with me and instead ended up showing that he had no coherent conception of what materialism is at all. It was interesting to me to see how inexperienced I was at debating back then (my first discussion group) and rusty at expressing myself - I had been working in a technical milleu for for 20 years.

      In the light of this philosophical naiveté, it wasn't surprising to see Der Staudi claiming that Steiner's PoF and TaS were 'typical examples of C19 German Idealism', in his debate with you in the '06 debate, whilst failing to understand in what ways both works transcended this formula. Once one sees through Der Staudi's thick fog of polemic and logical fallacies, and also checks one's own facts and understanding, it becomes much easier to see him for what he is - a retailer of the conventions and commonplaces of the age.

      T.

      Ted Wrinch

      --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "jmn36210" <jmn36210@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > Once upon a time, there lived in a certain Norwegian village
      > a mischievous and turbulent little boy, so enamoured with Scandinavian
      > folklore and French fairy tales that he had a little red riding hood
      > made for him. It suited him so extremely well that everybody called
      > him Little Red Hiding Hood.
      >
      > One day his mother, having made some cakes, said to him, "Go, my dear,
      > and see how your grandmother is doing, for I hear she has been very
      > ill. Take her a cake, and this little pot of (peanut) butter."
      >
      > Little Red Hiding Hood put on his snowshoes and set out immediately
      > to go to his grandmother, who lived in another village.
      >
      > As he was going through the wood, he met with a wolf, who had a very
      > great mind to eat him up, but he dared not, because of the many
      > surveillance cameras in the forest. He asked him where he was going.
      > The clever child, though he knew perfectly well that it was dangerous
      > to talk to a wolf, said to him,"I am going to see Grandma Sophia and
      > carry her a cake and a little pot of peanut butter from my mother."
      >
      > "Peanut butter? You're putting me on!" the wolf exclaimed,
      > "Look, Little Red Riding Hood, I happen to be an authority on all
      > sorts of 'fables convenues' and there is no bibliographical evidence
      > whatsoever to support the historicity of this er...scandalous
      > Americanized version of Charles Perrault's wonderful text."
      >
      > "Something very wrong is going on here...", said Dr Wolf to himself
      > perplexedly,"how can young LRRH speak American so well in this neck
      > of the woods, anyways?..."
      > As if he had been hit by a giant snowball, Dr Wolf suddenly realized
      > that his interlocutor was Little Red Hiding Hood, the mischievous
      > and turbulent little Tarjei - trolling as Little Red Riding Hood!
      >
      > "Does Grandma Sophia live far off? said the wolf.
      >
      > "Oh I say," answered Little Red Riding Hood; "it is beyond that mill
      > you see there, at the first house in the village."
      >
      > "Well," said the wolf, "and I'll go and see her too. I'll go this way
      > and go you that, and we shall see who will be there first."
      >
      > The wolf ran as fast as he could, taking the shortest path, and the
      > little boy took a roundabout way, entertaining himself by gathering
      > nuts, running after butterflies, and gathering bouquets of little
      > flowers. It was not long before the wolf arrived at the old woman's
      > house. He knocked at the door: tap, tap.
      >
      > "Who' there?"
      >
      > "Your grandchild, Little Red Riding Hood," replied the wolf,
      > counterfeiting his voice; "who has brought you a cake and a little pot
      > of peanut butter sent you by mother."
      >
      > The good grandmother, who was in bed, because she was somewhat ill,
      > cried out, "Pull the bobbin, and the latch will go up."
      >
      > The wolf pulled the bobbin, and the door opened, and then he immediately
      > fell upon the good woman and ate her up in a moment, for it been more
      > than three days since he had eaten. He then shut the door and got into
      > the grandmother's bed, expecting Little Red Riding Hood, who came some
      > time afterwards and knocked at the door: tap, tap.
      >
      > "Who's there?"
      >
      > Little Red Riding Hood, hearing the big voice of the wolf, was not
      > afraid at all, and answered, "It is your grandchild Little Red Riding
      > Hood, who has brought you a cake and a little pot of peanut butter
      > mother sends you."
      >
      > The wolf cried out to him, softening his voice as much as he could,
      > "Pull the bobbin, and the latch will go up."
      >
      > Little Red Riding Hood pulled the bobbin, and the door opened.
      >
      > The wolf, seeing him come in, said to him, hiding himself under the
      > bedclothes, "Put the cake and the little pot of peanut butter upon
      > the stool, and come get into bed with me."
      >
      > Little Red Riding Hood took off his clothes and got into bed.
      > He was greatly amazed to see how his grandmother looked in her
      > nightclothes, and said to her, "Grandmother, what big arms you have!"
      >
      > "All the better to hug you with, my dear."
      >
      > "Grandmother, what big legs you have!"
      >
      > "All the better to run with, my child."
      >
      > "Grandmother, what big ears you have!"
      >
      > "All the better to hear with, my child."
      >
      > "Grandmother, what big eyes you have!"
      >
      > "All the better to see with, my child."
      >
      > "Grandmother, what big teeth you have got!"
      >
      > "All the better to eat you up with."
      >
      >
      > And, saying these words, this wicked wolf turned "green as a canker",
      > and passed away - with its eyes rolled upwards.
      > The cadaver and the stench disappeared instantly.
      > Grandma Sophia reappeared with her gentle smile, saying "Little Red
      > Riding Hood, would you please bring the cake and this little pot of
      > peanut butter?..."
      >
      >
      > Moral: Warning! Anthroposophia can be hazardous to your health!
      >
      > Do not consume what you are not sincerely willing to truly digest
      > and humbly assimilate.
      > Beware, this celestial bread will act as a poison in the souls of
      > its profaners...
      >
      >
      >
      > Very weirdly,
      >
      > Jean-Marc
      >
    • jmn36210
      Ted, I believe you mean that the English translation I used is excellent. I merely introduced a few modifications and variations of mine :-)
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 2, 2012
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        Ted, I believe you mean that the English translation I used
        is excellent. I merely introduced a few modifications and
        variations of mine :-)

        http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/perrault02.html 



        Jean-Marc



        ==============================================================
        --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "ted.wrinch" <ted.wrinch@...> wrote:
        >
        > Tres bien, Jean-Marc!
        >
        > In a posting on WC, circa '06 - so long ago now! - you apologised for your 'poor English'. From what I've seen your English has always been good and is excellent in this piece!
        >
        > You labelled Walden as having 'AIDS' - acquired intellectual deficiency syndrome - in a later posting on WC. An accurate description and many have said equivalent in other words. A question that arises is what he's doing on the list. He doesn't know much about Steiner or spirituality (Charlotte gently rebuked him on the latter, which he didn't notice) or much else he comments on, beyond sport. He claims to be there to learn, but appears to have learnt little in the half decade of the list's existence.
        >
        > I've wondered why some of the others are there too - for some, like Pete K and Roger, it's pretty obvious that they are there because they have hatreds to express. Diana, who seems to have little to contribute, is a strange case. We know she's an editor and so spends her day working with the word. This can be a labour of love for those that enjoy helping talented people express their potential, but it can also be a frustrating, narrow activity that cramps one's own creativity and makes one feel smaller than those one serves. My guess is that Diana suffers from the latter; this could explain her need to emulate Der Staudi's style of argument and mocking academic superiority. But this is really a waste of her time and what she ought to do is to find a creative outlet for her energies. Her last post showed a degree of mental unbalance (the section on my censoring by Der Staudi was quite unhinged) which suggests that that list isn't a healthy place for her; from an anthro POV, it looks like her luciferic double is getting the better of her.
        >
        > It's always been apparent to me that Dugan suffers from scientism and is there mainly to attack the science.
        >
        > Der Staudi's main reason for being there appears to be because 3-folding provides a competitor vision of social reformation to his own. But, perhaps subconsciously, he knows that his own isn't viable (capitalism will never be replaced) and so he figures that it's best to try and attack Steiner intellectually.
        >
        > I also came across again the infamous (to me) Der Staudi posting on Ostwald, Steiner and materialism from 4.5 years ago, where he makes the lazily polemical claim that Steiner's understanding of materialism was 'inconsistent' (message 393). The basis of his claim was his fatally compromised statement:
        >
        > "Steiner proudly points to Ostwald as a prominent scientist who called for overcoming materialism. In these contexts, Ostwald
        > appears as a kind of pioneer of anti-materialism from within the scientific establishment, one whom Steiner gladly invokes to endorse Steiner's own
        > favored views."
        >
        > He never successfully defended this formulation in his debate with me and instead ended up showing that he had no coherent conception of what materialism is at all. It was interesting to me to see how inexperienced I was at debating back then (my first discussion group) and rusty at expressing myself - I had been working in a technical milleu for for 20 years.
        >
        > In the light of this philosophical naiveté, it wasn't surprising to see Der Staudi claiming that Steiner's PoF and TaS were 'typical examples of C19 German Idealism', in his debate with you in the '06 debate, whilst failing to understand in what ways both works transcended this formula. Once one sees through Der Staudi's thick fog of polemic and logical fallacies, and also checks one's own facts and understanding, it becomes much easier to see him for what he is - a retailer of the conventions and commonplaces of the age.
        >
        > T.
        >
        > Ted Wrinch
        >
        > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "jmn36210" jmn36210@ wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Once upon a time, there lived in a certain Norwegian village
        > > a mischievous and turbulent little boy, so enamoured with Scandinavian
        > > folklore and French fairy tales that he had a little red riding hood
        > > made for him. It suited him so extremely well that everybody called
        > > him Little Red Hiding Hood.
        > >
        > > One day his mother, having made some cakes, said to him, "Go, my dear,
        > > and see how your grandmother is doing, for I hear she has been very
        > > ill. Take her a cake, and this little pot of (peanut) butter."
        > >
        > > Little Red Hiding Hood put on his snowshoes and set out immediately
        > > to go to his grandmother, who lived in another village.
        > >
        > > As he was going through the wood, he met with a wolf, who had a very
        > > great mind to eat him up, but he dared not, because of the many
        > > surveillance cameras in the forest. He asked him where he was going.
        > > The clever child, though he knew perfectly well that it was dangerous
        > > to talk to a wolf, said to him,"I am going to see Grandma Sophia and
        > > carry her a cake and a little pot of peanut butter from my mother."
        > >
        > > "Peanut butter? You're putting me on!" the wolf exclaimed,
        > > "Look, Little Red Riding Hood, I happen to be an authority on all
        > > sorts of 'fables convenues' and there is no bibliographical evidence
        > > whatsoever to support the historicity of this er...scandalous
        > > Americanized version of Charles Perrault's wonderful text."
        > >
        > > "Something very wrong is going on here...", said Dr Wolf to himself
        > > perplexedly,"how can young LRRH speak American so well in this neck
        > > of the woods, anyways?..."
        > > As if he had been hit by a giant snowball, Dr Wolf suddenly realized
        > > that his interlocutor was Little Red Hiding Hood, the mischievous
        > > and turbulent little Tarjei - trolling as Little Red Riding Hood!
        > >
        > > "Does Grandma Sophia live far off? said the wolf.
        > >
        > > "Oh I say," answered Little Red Riding Hood; "it is beyond that mill
        > > you see there, at the first house in the village."
        > >
        > > "Well," said the wolf, "and I'll go and see her too. I'll go this way
        > > and go you that, and we shall see who will be there first."
        > >
        > > The wolf ran as fast as he could, taking the shortest path, and the
        > > little boy took a roundabout way, entertaining himself by gathering
        > > nuts, running after butterflies, and gathering bouquets of little
        > > flowers. It was not long before the wolf arrived at the old woman's
        > > house. He knocked at the door: tap, tap.
        > >
        > > "Who' there?"
        > >
        > > "Your grandchild, Little Red Riding Hood," replied the wolf,
        > > counterfeiting his voice; "who has brought you a cake and a little pot
        > > of peanut butter sent you by mother."
        > >
        > > The good grandmother, who was in bed, because she was somewhat ill,
        > > cried out, "Pull the bobbin, and the latch will go up."
        > >
        > > The wolf pulled the bobbin, and the door opened, and then he immediately
        > > fell upon the good woman and ate her up in a moment, for it been more
        > > than three days since he had eaten. He then shut the door and got into
        > > the grandmother's bed, expecting Little Red Riding Hood, who came some
        > > time afterwards and knocked at the door: tap, tap.
        > >
        > > "Who's there?"
        > >
        > > Little Red Riding Hood, hearing the big voice of the wolf, was not
        > > afraid at all, and answered, "It is your grandchild Little Red Riding
        > > Hood, who has brought you a cake and a little pot of peanut butter
        > > mother sends you."
        > >
        > > The wolf cried out to him, softening his voice as much as he could,
        > > "Pull the bobbin, and the latch will go up."
        > >
        > > Little Red Riding Hood pulled the bobbin, and the door opened.
        > >
        > > The wolf, seeing him come in, said to him, hiding himself under the
        > > bedclothes, "Put the cake and the little pot of peanut butter upon
        > > the stool, and come get into bed with me."
        > >
        > > Little Red Riding Hood took off his clothes and got into bed.
        > > He was greatly amazed to see how his grandmother looked in her
        > > nightclothes, and said to her, "Grandmother, what big arms you have!"
        > >
        > > "All the better to hug you with, my dear."
        > >
        > > "Grandmother, what big legs you have!"
        > >
        > > "All the better to run with, my child."
        > >
        > > "Grandmother, what big ears you have!"
        > >
        > > "All the better to hear with, my child."
        > >
        > > "Grandmother, what big eyes you have!"
        > >
        > > "All the better to see with, my child."
        > >
        > > "Grandmother, what big teeth you have got!"
        > >
        > > "All the better to eat you up with."
        > >
        > >
        > > And, saying these words, this wicked wolf turned "green as a canker",
        > > and passed away - with its eyes rolled upwards.
        > > The cadaver and the stench disappeared instantly.
        > > Grandma Sophia reappeared with her gentle smile, saying "Little Red
        > > Riding Hood, would you please bring the cake and this little pot of
        > > peanut butter?..."
        > >
        > >
        > > Moral: Warning! Anthroposophia can be hazardous to your health!
        > >
        > > Do not consume what you are not sincerely willing to truly digest
        > > and humbly assimilate.
        > > Beware, this celestial bread will act as a poison in the souls of
        > > its profaners...
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Very weirdly,
        > >
        > > Jean-Marc
        > >
        >
      • ted.wrinch
        Hah - well. that makes it a bit easier for you: :). T. Ted Wrinch
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 3, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
          Hah - well. that makes it a bit easier for you: :).

          T.

          Ted Wrinch

          --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "jmn36210" <jmn36210@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > Ted, I believe you mean that the English translation I used
          > is excellent. I merely introduced a few modifications and
          > variations of mine :-)
          >
          > http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/perrault02.html
          > <http://www.pitt.edu/%7Edash/perrault02.html>
          >
          >
          >
          > Jean-Marc
          >
          >
          >
          > ==============================================================
          > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "ted.wrinch"
          > <ted.wrinch@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Tres bien, Jean-Marc!
          > >
          > > In a posting on WC, circa '06 - so long ago now! - you apologised for
          > your 'poor English'. From what I've seen your English has always been
          > good and is excellent in this piece!
          > >
          > > You labelled Walden as having 'AIDS' - acquired intellectual
          > deficiency syndrome - in a later posting on WC. An accurate description
          > and many have said equivalent in other words. A question that arises is
          > what he's doing on the list. He doesn't know much about Steiner or
          > spirituality (Charlotte gently rebuked him on the latter, which he
          > didn't notice) or much else he comments on, beyond sport. He claims to
          > be there to learn, but appears to have learnt little in the half decade
          > of the list's existence.
          > >
          > > I've wondered why some of the others are there too - for some, like
          > Pete K and Roger, it's pretty obvious that they are there because they
          > have hatreds to express. Diana, who seems to have little to contribute,
          > is a strange case. We know she's an editor and so spends her day working
          > with the word. This can be a labour of love for those that enjoy helping
          > talented people express their potential, but it can also be a
          > frustrating, narrow activity that cramps one's own creativity and makes
          > one feel smaller than those one serves. My guess is that Diana suffers
          > from the latter; this could explain her need to emulate Der Staudi's
          > style of argument and mocking academic superiority. But this is really a
          > waste of her time and what she ought to do is to find a creative outlet
          > for her energies. Her last post showed a degree of mental unbalance (the
          > section on my censoring by Der Staudi was quite unhinged) which suggests
          > that that list isn't a healthy place for her; from an anthro POV, it
          > looks like her luciferic double is getting the better of her.
          > >
          > > It's always been apparent to me that Dugan suffers from scientism and
          > is there mainly to attack the science.
          > >
          > > Der Staudi's main reason for being there appears to be because
          > 3-folding provides a competitor vision of social reformation to his own.
          > But, perhaps subconsciously, he knows that his own isn't viable
          > (capitalism will never be replaced) and so he figures that it's best to
          > try and attack Steiner intellectually.
          > >
          > > I also came across again the infamous (to me) Der Staudi posting on
          > Ostwald, Steiner and materialism from 4.5 years ago, where he makes the
          > lazily polemical claim that Steiner's understanding of materialism was
          > 'inconsistent' (message 393). The basis of his claim was his fatally
          > compromised statement:
          > >
          > > "Steiner proudly points to Ostwald as a prominent scientist who called
          > for overcoming materialism. In these contexts, Ostwald
          > > appears as a kind of pioneer of anti-materialism from within the
          > scientific establishment, one whom Steiner gladly invokes to endorse
          > Steiner's own
          > > favored views."
          > >
          > > He never successfully defended this formulation in his debate with me
          > and instead ended up showing that he had no coherent conception of what
          > materialism is at all. It was interesting to me to see how inexperienced
          > I was at debating back then (my first discussion group) and rusty at
          > expressing myself - I had been working in a technical milleu for for 20
          > years.
          > >
          > > In the light of this philosophical naiveté, it wasn't surprising to
          > see Der Staudi claiming that Steiner's PoF and TaS were 'typical
          > examples of C19 German Idealism', in his debate with you in the '06
          > debate, whilst failing to understand in what ways both works transcended
          > this formula. Once one sees through Der Staudi's thick fog of polemic
          > and logical fallacies, and also checks one's own facts and
          > understanding, it becomes much easier to see him for what he is - a
          > retailer of the conventions and commonplaces of the age.
          > >
          > > T.
          > >
          > > Ted Wrinch
          > >
          > > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "jmn36210" jmn36210@
          > wrote:
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > Once upon a time, there lived in a certain Norwegian village
          > > > a mischievous and turbulent little boy, so enamoured with
          > Scandinavian
          > > > folklore and French fairy tales that he had a little red riding hood
          > > > made for him. It suited him so extremely well that everybody called
          > > > him Little Red Hiding Hood.
          > > >
          > > > One day his mother, having made some cakes, said to him, "Go, my
          > dear,
          > > > and see how your grandmother is doing, for I hear she has been very
          > > > ill. Take her a cake, and this little pot of (peanut) butter."
          > > >
          > > > Little Red Hiding Hood put on his snowshoes and set out immediately
          > > > to go to his grandmother, who lived in another village.
          > > >
          > > > As he was going through the wood, he met with a wolf, who had a very
          > > > great mind to eat him up, but he dared not, because of the many
          > > > surveillance cameras in the forest. He asked him where he was going.
          > > > The clever child, though he knew perfectly well that it was
          > dangerous
          > > > to talk to a wolf, said to him,"I am going to see Grandma Sophia and
          > > > carry her a cake and a little pot of peanut butter from my mother."
          > > >
          > > > "Peanut butter? You're putting me on!" the wolf exclaimed,
          > > > "Look, Little Red Riding Hood, I happen to be an authority on all
          > > > sorts of 'fables convenues' and there is no bibliographical evidence
          > > > whatsoever to support the historicity of this er...scandalous
          > > > Americanized version of Charles Perrault's wonderful text."
          > > >
          > > > "Something very wrong is going on here...", said Dr Wolf to himself
          > > > perplexedly,"how can young LRRH speak American so well in this neck
          > > > of the woods, anyways?..."
          > > > As if he had been hit by a giant snowball, Dr Wolf suddenly realized
          > > > that his interlocutor was Little Red Hiding Hood, the mischievous
          > > > and turbulent little Tarjei - trolling as Little Red Riding Hood!
          > > >
          > > > "Does Grandma Sophia live far off? said the wolf.
          > > >
          > > > "Oh I say," answered Little Red Riding Hood; "it is beyond that mill
          > > > you see there, at the first house in the village."
          > > >
          > > > "Well," said the wolf, "and I'll go and see her too. I'll go this
          > way
          > > > and go you that, and we shall see who will be there first."
          > > >
          > > > The wolf ran as fast as he could, taking the shortest path, and the
          > > > little boy took a roundabout way, entertaining himself by gathering
          > > > nuts, running after butterflies, and gathering bouquets of little
          > > > flowers. It was not long before the wolf arrived at the old woman's
          > > > house. He knocked at the door: tap, tap.
          > > >
          > > > "Who' there?"
          > > >
          > > > "Your grandchild, Little Red Riding Hood," replied the wolf,
          > > > counterfeiting his voice; "who has brought you a cake and a little
          > pot
          > > > of peanut butter sent you by mother."
          > > >
          > > > The good grandmother, who was in bed, because she was somewhat ill,
          > > > cried out, "Pull the bobbin, and the latch will go up."
          > > >
          > > > The wolf pulled the bobbin, and the door opened, and then he
          > immediately
          > > > fell upon the good woman and ate her up in a moment, for it been
          > more
          > > > than three days since he had eaten. He then shut the door and got
          > into
          > > > the grandmother's bed, expecting Little Red Riding Hood, who came
          > some
          > > > time afterwards and knocked at the door: tap, tap.
          > > >
          > > > "Who's there?"
          > > >
          > > > Little Red Riding Hood, hearing the big voice of the wolf, was not
          > > > afraid at all, and answered, "It is your grandchild Little Red
          > Riding
          > > > Hood, who has brought you a cake and a little pot of peanut butter
          > > > mother sends you."
          > > >
          > > > The wolf cried out to him, softening his voice as much as he could,
          > > > "Pull the bobbin, and the latch will go up."
          > > >
          > > > Little Red Riding Hood pulled the bobbin, and the door opened.
          > > >
          > > > The wolf, seeing him come in, said to him, hiding himself under the
          > > > bedclothes, "Put the cake and the little pot of peanut butter upon
          > > > the stool, and come get into bed with me."
          > > >
          > > > Little Red Riding Hood took off his clothes and got into bed.
          > > > He was greatly amazed to see how his grandmother looked in her
          > > > nightclothes, and said to her, "Grandmother, what big arms you
          > have!"
          > > >
          > > > "All the better to hug you with, my dear."
          > > >
          > > > "Grandmother, what big legs you have!"
          > > >
          > > > "All the better to run with, my child."
          > > >
          > > > "Grandmother, what big ears you have!"
          > > >
          > > > "All the better to hear with, my child."
          > > >
          > > > "Grandmother, what big eyes you have!"
          > > >
          > > > "All the better to see with, my child."
          > > >
          > > > "Grandmother, what big teeth you have got!"
          > > >
          > > > "All the better to eat you up with."
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > And, saying these words, this wicked wolf turned "green as a
          > canker",
          > > > and passed away - with its eyes rolled upwards.
          > > > The cadaver and the stench disappeared instantly.
          > > > Grandma Sophia reappeared with her gentle smile, saying "Little Red
          > > > Riding Hood, would you please bring the cake and this little pot of
          > > > peanut butter?..."
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > Moral: Warning! Anthroposophia can be hazardous to your health!
          > > >
          > > > Do not consume what you are not sincerely willing to truly digest
          > > > and humbly assimilate.
          > > > Beware, this celestial bread will act as a poison in the souls of
          > > > its profaners...
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > Very weirdly,
          > > >
          > > > Jean-Marc
          > > >
          > >
          >
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