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Re: Facebook sucks

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  • elfuncle
    The assault against online anonymity now spearheaded by Facebook is troublesome. Facebook is trying to capture the entire web through a log-on system that
    Message 1 of 22 , Dec 4, 2011
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      The assault against online anonymity now spearheaded by Facebook is troublesome. Facebook is trying to capture the entire web through a log-on system that combines all your registered accounts through one single password. I don't go for that. I use separate accounts for separate services and domains, for as long as such an option lasts.

      The powers that be probably wish to get at all the pirates and the hackers and the spammers and so on by eliminating online anonymity. You can't even buy an anomymous cell phone anymore, at least not in Norway, like you could in the late nineties, when you just bought a phone, put a cash card in it, and you had a phone number belonging to nobody. Now every phone -- and especially every sim card (which carries your phone number) has to be registered in a real person's name, it's the law -- probably a Taliban sort of thing. Yep, that's it: The Taliban doctrine. We're losing our anonymity because of the Taliban, because of ABB, and we comply and don't complain because otherwise them trrrr-sssts (like GWB called them) will come and get us in the middle of the night.

      On the other hand, if you're in a forum like this one for a long, long time and everybody else is anonymous as though it's terribly dangerous to opine about anthroposophy and philosophy and so on, that's poor and dumb netiquette imho. It reminds me of Glenn Frey's Smugglers' Blues, 2nd verse:

      No matter if it's heroin, cocaine, or hash,
      You've got to carry weapons
      Cause you always carry cash.
      There's lots of shady characters,
      Lots of dirty deals.
      Ev'ry name's an alias
      In case somebody squeals.

      It's the lure of easy money,
      It's gotta very strong appeal.

       

      Glenn Frey: "Smugglers blues" 


      Tarjei



      --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, Maurice McCarthy <manselton@...> wrote:
      >
      > Tarjei
      >
      > I do appreciate what you are saying. That the internet was intended as
      > a means of communication and the cultural gift of the world wide web
      > made that even easier so that privacy was never intended, quite the
      > contrary. But things change. It has developed into a global, social
      > world of it own. Consequently, in my judgment there ought to room for
      > a person to have both a private and a public life within it. As an
      > individual I find times of privacy important. Maybe I should just
      > switch off the computer - I'm sure it would be the best way. But is
      > anonymity a crime on the web? Why should I accept google and others
      > tracking my every move like Big Brother and the thought police? It is
      > the grey area between truth and error where Ahriman thrives.
      >
      > I was pleased when I was _not able to open my own bank account from
      > behind the jondo proxy and nor from running the triple encrypted i2p
      > protocol. (An attempt to have a safe protocol where no host is trusted
      > by utilising the unused upload bandwith on home computers to create a
      > secret net within the www. At present it is very slow because only so
      > many thousand use it. One way to speed it up a little is to take down
      > your firewall !!! But if you cannot read the open code then you need
      > to be able to trust whoever wrote it. ) http://www.i2p2.de/
      >
      > Kindest Regards
      > Maurice
      >
      >
      >
      > On 03/12/2011, elfuncle elfuncle@... wrote:
      > > The internet is not a private thing, and it never has been. Those who
      > > treat social media like FB like their own bedrooms or something get what
      > > they've been asking for imho when their perceived and delusional online
      > > privacy is violated by the owners of the domains they're using, whether
      > > it's Yahoo or Google or Facebook or whatever. I've been saying this for
      > > years, but nobody listens to to the deep wisdom of Uncle Taz.
      > >
      > > They can "improve privacy" until they're blue in their faces, I still
      > > wouldn't trust them. The only thing one should demand is the security of
      > > online banking and transactions and protection against the kind of ID
      > > theft that Frank's better half has been victimized by. If, on the other
      > > hand, people wish to upload their drunken underwear pictures and then
      > > feel embarrassed about them afterwards and scream bloody murder when
      > > "Zuckerboy" sells them to the ad industry, -- well, no comment.
      > >
      > > Don't trust the privacy of emails and text messages either. Remember,
      > > being paranoid doesn't mean they're not out to get ya -- right Frank? ;)
      > >
      > > Tarjei
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, Maurice McCarthy
      > > manselton@ wrote:
      > >>
      > >> Have a look at the section on Facebook here
      > >> http://anonymous-proxy-servers.net/en/help/wwwprivacy.html
      > >> It comes from developers at the Technical University of Dresden. It is
      > >> the commercial arm of their effort to improve privacy on the internet.
      > >>
      > >> M
      > >>
      > >
      > >
      >
    • dottie zold
      Hey Taz, my experience is that even though I have not connected the yahoo or any phone to the facebook account they actually have been given privledge somehow
      Message 2 of 22 , Dec 4, 2011
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        Hey Taz, my experience is that even though I have not connected the yahoo or any phone to the facebook account they actually have been given privledge somehow to my yahoo names which coincide with facebook friends. I see such interesting occurrances in my spam mail that shows me this.
         
        A post of pictures just went up on Facebook of my photo album and I didn't sent it up they sent it up to keep conversation going or whatever...strange strange strange.
         
        Good Sunda to you,
        d

        "Hence only by means of love can we give real help for karma to work out in the right way." Rudolf Steiner



        --- On Sun, 12/4/11, elfuncle <elfuncle@...> wrote:

        From: elfuncle <elfuncle@...>
        Subject: [anthroposophy_tomorrow] Re: Facebook sucks
        To: anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Sunday, December 4, 2011, 12:13 AM

         
        The assault against online anonymity now spearheaded by Facebook is troublesome. Facebook is trying to capture the entire web through a log-on system that combines all your registered accounts through one single password. I don't go for that. I use separate accounts for separate services and domains, for as long as such an option lasts.

        The powers that be probably wish to get at all the pirates and the hackers and the spammers and so on by eliminating online anonymity. You can't even buy an anomymous cell phone anymore, at least not in Norway, like you could in the late nineties, when you just bought a phone, put a cash card in it, and you had a phone number belonging to nobody. Now every phone -- and especially every sim card (which carries your phone number) has to be registered in a real person's name, it's the law -- probably a Taliban sort of thing. Yep, that's it: The Taliban doctrine. We're losing our anonymity because of the Taliban, because of ABB, and we comply and don't complain because otherwise them trrrr-sssts (like GWB called them) will come and get us in the middle of the night.

        On the other hand, if you're in a forum like this one for a long, long time and everybody else is anonymous as though it's terribly dangerous to opine about anthroposophy and philosophy and so on, that's poor and dumb netiquette imho. It reminds me of Glenn Frey's Smugglers' Blues, 2nd verse:

        No matter if it's heroin, cocaine, or hash,
        You've got to carry weapons
        Cause you always carry cash.
        There's lots of shady characters,
        Lots of dirty deals.
        Ev'ry name's an alias
        In case somebody squeals.

        It's the lure of easy money,
        It's gotta very strong appeal.

         

        Glenn Frey: "Smugglers blues" 


        Tarjei



        --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, Maurice McCarthy <manselton@...> wrote:
        >
        > Tarjei
        >
        > I do appreciate what you are saying. That the internet was intended as
        > a means of communication and the cultural gift of the world wide web
        > made that even easier so that privacy was never intended, quite the
        > contrary. But things change. It has developed into a global, social
        > world of it own. Consequently, in my judgment there ought to room for
        > a person to have both a private and a public life within it. As an
        > individual I find times of privacy important. Maybe I should just
        > switch off the computer - I'm sure it would be the best way. But is
        > anonymity a crime on the web? Why should I accept google and others
        > tracking my every move like Big Brother and the thought police? It is
        > the grey area between truth and error where Ahriman thrives.
        >
        > I was pleased when I was _not able to open my own bank account from
        > behind the jondo proxy and nor from running the triple encrypted i2p
        > protocol. (An attempt to have a safe protocol where no host is trusted
        > by utilising the unused upload bandwith on home computers to create a
        > secret net within the www. At present it is very slow because only so
        > many thousand use it. One way to speed it up a little is to take down
        > your firewall !!! But if you cannot read the open code then you need
        > to be able to trust whoever wrote it. ) http://www.i2p2.de/
        >
        > Kindest Regards
        > Maurice
        >
        >
        >
        > On 03/12/2011, elfuncle elfuncle@... wrote:
        > > The internet is not a private thing, and it never has been. Those who
        > > treat social media like FB like their own bedrooms or something get what
        > > they've been asking for imho when their perceived and delusional online
        > > privacy is violated by the owners of the domains they're using, whether
        > > it's Yahoo or Google or Facebook or whatever. I've been saying this for
        > > years, but nobody listens to to the deep wisdom of Uncle Taz.
        > >
        > > They can "improve privacy" until they're blue in their faces, I still
        > > wouldn't trust them. The only thing one should demand is the security of
        > > online banking and transactions and protection against the kind of ID
        > > theft that Frank's better half has been victimized by. If, on the other
        > > hand, people wish to upload their drunken underwear pictures and then
        > > feel embarrassed about them afterwards and scream bloody murder when
        > > "Zuckerboy" sells them to the ad industry, -- well, no comment.
        > >
        > > Don't trust the privacy of emails and text messages either. Remember,
        > > being paranoid doesn't mean they're not out to get ya -- right Frank? ;)
        > >
        > > Tarjei
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, Maurice McCarthy
        > > manselton@ wrote:
        > >>
        > >> Have a look at the section on Facebook here
        > >> http://anonymous-proxy-servers.net/en/help/wwwprivacy.html
        > >> It comes from developers at the Technical University of Dresden. It is
        > >> the commercial arm of their effort to improve privacy on the internet.
        > >>
        > >> M
        > >>
        > >
        > >
        >
      • Frank Thomas Smith
        I think it s time to launch a occupy facebook movement. You may say: Why don t you just unsubscribe? It is not possible to unsubscribe from Facebook. You can
        Message 3 of 22 , Dec 4, 2011
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          I think it's time to launch a "occupy facebook" movement. You may say: Why don't you just unsubscribe?
          It is not possible to unsubscribe from Facebook. You can take down your data from the page, but they keep it on file, for your benefit of course...just in case you ever want to resubscribe. Besides, that beautiful chic who got me in continues to exert pressure. "Facebook or me"? No: "all or nothing".
          Frank

          --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, dottie zold <dottie_z@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hey Taz, my experience is that even though I have not connected the yahoo or any phone to the facebook account they actually have been given privledge somehow to my yahoo names which coincide with facebook friends. I see such interesting occurrances in my spam mail that shows me this.
          >  
          > A post of pictures just went up on Facebook of my photo album and I didn't sent it up they sent it up to keep conversation going or whatever...strange strange strange.
          >  
          > Good Sunda to you,
          > d
          >
          >
          > "Hence only by means of love can we give real help for karma to work out in the right way." Rudolf Steiner
          >
          >
          >
          > --- On Sun, 12/4/11, elfuncle <elfuncle@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > From: elfuncle <elfuncle@...>
          > Subject: [anthroposophy_tomorrow] Re: Facebook sucks
          > To: anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: Sunday, December 4, 2011, 12:13 AM
          >
          >
          >
          >  
          >
          >
          >
          > The assault against online anonymity now spearheaded by Facebook is troublesome. Facebook is trying to capture the entire web through a log-on system that combines all your registered accounts through one single password. I don't go for that. I use separate accounts for separate services and domains, for as long as such an option lasts.
          >
          > The powers that be probably wish to get at all the pirates and the hackers and the spammers and so on by eliminating online anonymity. You can't even buy an anomymous cell phone anymore, at least not in Norway, like you could in the late nineties, when you just bought a phone, put a cash card in it, and you had a phone number belonging to nobody. Now every phone -- and especially every sim card (which carries your phone number) has to be registered in a real person's name, it's the law -- probably a Taliban sort of thing. Yep, that's it: The Taliban doctrine. We're losing our anonymity because of the Taliban, because of ABB, and we comply and don't complain because otherwise them trrrr-sssts (like GWB called them) will come and get us in the middle of the night.
          >
          > On the other hand, if you're in a forum like this one for a long, long time and everybody else is anonymous as though it's terribly dangerous to opine about anthroposophy and philosophy and so on, that's poor and dumb netiquette imho. It reminds me of Glenn Frey's Smugglers' Blues, 2nd verse:
          >
          >
          > No matter if it's heroin, cocaine, or hash,
          > You've got to carry weapons
          > Cause you always carry cash.
          > There's lots of shady characters,
          > Lots of dirty deals.
          > Ev'ry name's an alias
          > In case somebody squeals.
          > It's the lure of easy money,
          > It's gotta very strong appeal.
          >
          >  
          >
          >
          > Glenn Frey: "Smugglers blues" 
          > Tarjei
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, Maurice McCarthy <manselton@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Tarjei
          > >
          > > I do appreciate what you are saying. That the internet was intended as
          > > a means of communication and the cultural gift of the world wide web
          > > made that even easier so that privacy was never intended, quite the
          > > contrary. But things change. It has developed into a global, social
          > > world of it own. Consequently, in my judgment there ought to room for
          > > a person to have both a private and a public life within it. As an
          > > individual I find times of privacy important. Maybe I should just
          > > switch off the computer - I'm sure it would be the best way. But is
          > > anonymity a crime on the web? Why should I accept google and others
          > > tracking my every move like Big Brother and the thought police? It is
          > > the grey area between truth and error where Ahriman thrives.
          > >
          > > I was pleased when I was _not able to open my own bank account from
          > > behind the jondo proxy and nor from running the triple encrypted i2p
          > > protocol. (An attempt to have a safe protocol where no host is trusted
          > > by utilising the unused upload bandwith on home computers to create a
          > > secret net within the www. At present it is very slow because only so
          > > many thousand use it. One way to speed it up a little is to take down
          > > your firewall !!! But if you cannot read the open code then you need
          > > to be able to trust whoever wrote it. ) http://www.i2p2.de/
          > >
          > > Kindest Regards
          > > Maurice
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > On 03/12/2011, elfuncle elfuncle@ wrote:
          > > > The internet is not a private thing, and it never has been. Those who
          > > > treat social media like FB like their own bedrooms or something get what
          > > > they've been asking for imho when their perceived and delusional online
          > > > privacy is violated by the owners of the domains they're using, whether
          > > > it's Yahoo or Google or Facebook or whatever. I've been saying this for
          > > > years, but nobody listens to to the deep wisdom of Uncle Taz.
          > > >
          > > > They can "improve privacy" until they're blue in their faces, I still
          > > > wouldn't trust them. The only thing one should demand is the security of
          > > > online banking and transactions and protection against the kind of ID
          > > > theft that Frank's better half has been victimized by. If, on the other
          > > > hand, people wish to upload their drunken underwear pictures and then
          > > > feel embarrassed about them afterwards and scream bloody murder when
          > > > "Zuckerboy" sells them to the ad industry, -- well, no comment.
          > > >
          > > > Don't trust the privacy of emails and text messages either. Remember,
          > > > being paranoid doesn't mean they're not out to get ya -- right Frank? ;)
          > > >
          > > > Tarjei
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, Maurice McCarthy
          > > > manselton@ wrote:
          > > >>
          > > >> Have a look at the section on Facebook here
          > > >> http://anonymous-proxy-servers.net/en/help/wwwprivacy.html
          > > >> It comes from developers at the Technical University of Dresden. It is
          > > >> the commercial arm of their effort to improve privacy on the internet.
          > > >>
          > > >> M
          > > >>
          > > >
          > > >
          > >
          >
        • Frank Thomas Smith
          To all those suckers who contribute to making Facebook stockholders rich:
          Message 4 of 22 , Feb 2, 2012
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            To all those suckers who contribute to making Facebook stockholders rich:


            http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/02/technology/for-founders-to-decorators-facebook-riches.html?hp

            Frank
          • ted.wrinch
            Serendipity! I came across this video of a talk given by our Eugene Schwarz in 2010 at the Glasshouse, Stourbridge, UK. I think I retrospectively posted the
            Message 5 of 22 , Feb 2, 2012
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              Serendipity! I came across this video of a talk given by our Eugene Schwarz in 2010 at the Glasshouse, Stourbridge, UK. I think I retrospectively posted the schedule of the conference he's attending before Christmas. Anyway, if you take a look at the video at around 42 minutes he's describing the life of Zuckerboy and the film they made of it called 'The Social Network'. He thinks Mr Facebook is classic Aspergers but also a kind of angel. It's the first I've seen of Mr Schwarz and I think that he's an ace speaker!

              http://vimeo.com/20002576

              T.

              Ted Wrinch

              --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "Frank Thomas Smith" <fts.trasla@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > To all those suckers who contribute to making Facebook stockholders rich:
              >
              >
              > http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/02/technology/for-founders-to-decorators-facebook-riches.html?hp
              >
              > Frank
              >
            • Frank Thomas Smith
              Great lecture - thanks. Frank
              Message 6 of 22 , Feb 2, 2012
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                Great lecture - thanks.
                Frank


                --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "ted.wrinch" <ted.wrinch@...> wrote:
                >
                > Serendipity! I came across this video of a talk given by our Eugene Schwarz in 2010 at the Glasshouse, Stourbridge, UK. I think I retrospectively posted the schedule of the conference he's attending before Christmas. Anyway, if you take a look at the video at around 42 minutes he's describing the life of Zuckerboy and the film they made of it called 'The Social Network'. He thinks Mr Facebook is classic Aspergers but also a kind of angel. It's the first I've seen of Mr Schwarz and I think that he's an ace speaker!
                >
                > http://vimeo.com/20002576
                >
                > T.
                >
                > Ted Wrinch
                >
                > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "Frank Thomas Smith" <fts.trasla@> wrote:
                > >
                > >
                > > To all those suckers who contribute to making Facebook stockholders rich:
                > >
                > >
                > > http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/02/technology/for-founders-to-decorators-facebook-riches.html?hp
                > >
                > > Frank
                > >
                >
              • ted.wrinch
                You re welcome, Frank. He s done a few more on education you might not have seen; all are v. good. He seems such a nice guy - must have been great to have him
                Message 7 of 22 , Feb 3, 2012
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                  You're welcome, Frank. He's done a few more on education you might not have seen; all are v. good. He seems such a nice guy - must have been great to have him as a teacher!

                  Today's Children Need Tomorrow's Schools - Elmfield School Lecture

                  http://vimeo.com/19764517

                  I'm so impressed; this guy is dynamite! I love the introduction he gives where he describes the first school intake in Stuttgart for the Waldorf cigarette factory kids. Steiner wanted to take these 'apprentice fodder' kids and give them the same quality of education as the rich middle class kids, but in 'half the time', as they had to go to work by 8th grade. I can see why Mr Schwarz has his own web-site, is in demand around the world, and was awarded a Teaching Fellowship at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching in Princeton. Must be amazing to have this kind of talent.


                  What is Waldorf Education? Part 1 Interview with Eugene Schwartz

                  http://vimeo.com/22396764

                  What is Waldorf Education? Part 2 Interview with Eugene Schwartz

                  http://vimeo.com/22397678

                  T.

                  Ted Wrinch

                  --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "Frank Thomas Smith" <fts.trasla@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Great lecture - thanks.
                  > Frank
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "ted.wrinch" <ted.wrinch@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Serendipity! I came across this video of a talk given by our Eugene Schwarz in 2010 at the Glasshouse, Stourbridge, UK. I think I retrospectively posted the schedule of the conference he's attending before Christmas. Anyway, if you take a look at the video at around 42 minutes he's describing the life of Zuckerboy and the film they made of it called 'The Social Network'. He thinks Mr Facebook is classic Aspergers but also a kind of angel. It's the first I've seen of Mr Schwarz and I think that he's an ace speaker!
                  > >
                  > > http://vimeo.com/20002576
                  > >
                  > > T.
                  > >
                  > > Ted Wrinch
                  > >
                  > > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "Frank Thomas Smith" <fts.trasla@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > To all those suckers who contribute to making Facebook stockholders rich:
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/02/technology/for-founders-to-decorators-facebook-riches.html?hp
                  > > >
                  > > > Frank
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
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