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Gary Lachman

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  • ted.wrinch
    I don t know if anyone s read anything by Mr Lachman but I ve been dipping into Politics and the Occult: The Left, the Right, and the Radically Unseen  and
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 14, 2011
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      I don't know if anyone's read anything by Mr Lachman but I've been dipping into "Politics and the Occult: The Left, the Right, and the Radically Unseen " and I'm rather impressed. He has a good understanding of his material, backed up with comprehensive references. For example, on the subject of the importance of tradition in the occult he quotes from Julius Evola's 'Ride the tiger: a survival manual for aristocrats of the soul' where Evola decries what he sees as the damaging influence of jazz on tradition. Lachman then cleverly switches to the left and quotes from Theodore Adorno's 'Dialectic of enlightenment', where Adorno decries the influence of the 'culture industry' in keeping the masses docile through pandering to and even creating tastes through things like jazz. Adorno, of course, would despise Evola's work - he called occultism the 'metaphysics of dunces'. But Lachman steers a steady course through these kinds of tensions and I think I'll continue with and maybe even buy a copy of his work. Der Staudi, in his usual elitist manner, dismisses Lachman with: ' .

      ""Lachman is a former rock star and an enthusiast of the occult. His bio of Steiner isn't terrible, but it is hardly a work of history. It's a popular account based on anthroposophist sources."

      As we all know, Der Staudi has many times described himself as an 'intellectual democrat' who believes everyone, with a bit of reading and perhaps thought (though probably mostly reading), can contribute to public discussion and 'knowledge formation'. Der Staudi is such a liar and fraud!

      T.

      Ted Wrinch
    • Frank Thomas Smith
      ... _________ Hi Ted, Evola is unfortunately tainted by fascism and anti-semitism: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julius_Evola . I haven t read Lachman s book,
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 14, 2011
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        --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "ted.wrinch" <ted.wrinch@...> wrote:
        >
        > I don't know if anyone's read anything by Mr Lachman but I've been dipping into "Politics and the Occult: The Left, the Right, and the Radically Unseen " and I'm rather impressed. He has a good understanding of his material, backed up with comprehensive references. For example, on the subject of the importance of tradition in the occult he quotes from Julius Evola's 'Ride the tiger: a survival manual for aristocrats of the soul' where Evola decries what he sees as the damaging influence of jazz on tradition. Lachman then cleverly switches to the left and quotes from Theodore Adorno's 'Dialectic of enlightenment', where Adorno decries the influence of the 'culture industry' in keeping the masses docile through pandering to and even creating tastes through things like jazz.
        _________

        Hi Ted,
        Evola is unfortunately tainted by fascism and anti-semitism: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julius_Evola . I haven't read Lachman's book, so I wonder if he mentions this aspect, and if the "taint" is justified. His biography of Rudolf Steiner is, imo, nicely written in the sense of being free of academicisms. Jazz as not a popular musical phenomenon for those guys; Marie Steiner also criticized it, probably reflecting Rudolf's distaste as well. But none of those people knew much or anything about jazz. The word was more likely a symbol for Adorno's "culture industry."
        ______

        <snip>


        >
        T: As we all know, Der Staudi has many times described himself as an 'intellectual democrat' who believes everyone, with a bit of reading and perhaps thought (though probably mostly reading), can contribute to public discussion and 'knowledge formation'. Der Staudi is such a liar and fraud!

        F: I don't know about that, but his thinking is certainly consistent with his present Jesuit ambiance.




        >
        > T.
        >
        > Ted Wrinch
        >
      • dottie zold
        Oh I was so unhappy with Mr. Lachman s portrayal of Rudolf Steiner in the book. I just thougth it awful and gossipy and just so sad it had been written.   All
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 14, 2011
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          Oh I was so unhappy with Mr. Lachman's portrayal of Rudolf Steiner in the book. I just thougth it awful and gossipy and just so sad it had been written.
           
          All good things,
          Dottie

          "Hence only by means of love can we give real help for karma to work out in the right way." Rudolf Steiner



          --- On Mon, 11/14/11, Frank Thomas Smith <fts.trasla@...> wrote:

          From: Frank Thomas Smith <fts.trasla@...>
          Subject: [anthroposophy_tomorrow] Re: Gary Lachman
          To: anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Monday, November 14, 2011, 4:21 PM

           


          --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "ted.wrinch" <ted.wrinch@...> wrote:
          >
          > I don't know if anyone's read anything by Mr Lachman but I've been dipping into "Politics and the Occult: The Left, the Right, and the Radically Unseen " and I'm rather impressed. He has a good understanding of his material, backed up with comprehensive references. For example, on the subject of the importance of tradition in the occult he quotes from Julius Evola's 'Ride the tiger: a survival manual for aristocrats of the soul' where Evola decries what he sees as the damaging influence of jazz on tradition. Lachman then cleverly switches to the left and quotes from Theodore Adorno's 'Dialectic of enlightenment', where Adorno decries the influence of the 'culture industry' in keeping the masses docile through pandering to and even creating tastes through things like jazz.
          _________

          Hi Ted,
          Evola is unfortunately tainted by fascism and anti-semitism: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julius_Evola . I haven't read Lachman's book, so I wonder if he mentions this aspect, and if the "taint" is justified. His biography of Rudolf Steiner is, imo, nicely written in the sense of being free of academicisms. Jazz as not a popular musical phenomenon for those guys; Marie Steiner also criticized it, probably reflecting Rudolf's distaste as well. But none of those people knew much or anything about jazz. The word was more likely a symbol for Adorno's "culture industry."
          ______

          <snip>

          >
          T: As we all know, Der Staudi has many times described himself as an 'intellectual democrat' who believes everyone, with a bit of reading and perhaps thought (though probably mostly reading), can contribute to public discussion and 'knowledge formation'. Der Staudi is such a liar and fraud!

          F: I don't know about that, but his thinking is certainly consistent with his present Jesuit ambiance.

          >
          > T.
          >
          > Ted Wrinch
          >

        • ted.wrinch
          I know about Evola s fascist connections -hadn t heard about him before PS mentioned him and then I looked him up a while a go. But he s only a passing
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 15, 2011
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            I know about Evola's fascist connections -hadn't heard about him before PS mentioned him and then I looked him up a while a go. But he's only a passing reference in Lachman's book from what I've seen.

            The Jazz thing seems to have been a problem for many at that time - one of my early influences was the Western journalist and yogi Paul Brunton and he described it as a damaging influence on the spirit. I think that's right about Adorno; the point Lachman was making was that there can be similarities in the opinions between those on the left and the right.

            I think it's so ironic that Der Staudi is now working in Jesuitland; add to that Zander in Catholicdom and we have a perfect trans-atlantic storm of criticism. The anthro web reference has some quite interesting stuff on Zander too but I thought that one posting of mashed-up English was enough!

            T.

            Ted Wrinch


            --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "Frank Thomas Smith" <fts.trasla@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "ted.wrinch" <ted.wrinch@> wrote:
            > >
            > > I don't know if anyone's read anything by Mr Lachman but I've been dipping into "Politics and the Occult: The Left, the Right, and the Radically Unseen " and I'm rather impressed. He has a good understanding of his material, backed up with comprehensive references. For example, on the subject of the importance of tradition in the occult he quotes from Julius Evola's 'Ride the tiger: a survival manual for aristocrats of the soul' where Evola decries what he sees as the damaging influence of jazz on tradition. Lachman then cleverly switches to the left and quotes from Theodore Adorno's 'Dialectic of enlightenment', where Adorno decries the influence of the 'culture industry' in keeping the masses docile through pandering to and even creating tastes through things like jazz.
            > _________
            >
            > Hi Ted,
            > Evola is unfortunately tainted by fascism and anti-semitism: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julius_Evola . I haven't read Lachman's book, so I wonder if he mentions this aspect, and if the "taint" is justified. His biography of Rudolf Steiner is, imo, nicely written in the sense of being free of academicisms. Jazz as not a popular musical phenomenon for those guys; Marie Steiner also criticized it, probably reflecting Rudolf's distaste as well. But none of those people knew much or anything about jazz. The word was more likely a symbol for Adorno's "culture industry."
            > ______
            >
            > <snip>
            >
            >
            > >
            > T: As we all know, Der Staudi has many times described himself as an 'intellectual democrat' who believes everyone, with a bit of reading and perhaps thought (though probably mostly reading), can contribute to public discussion and 'knowledge formation'. Der Staudi is such a liar and fraud!
            >
            > F: I don't know about that, but his thinking is certainly consistent with his present Jesuit ambiance.
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > >
            > > T.
            > >
            > > Ted Wrinch
            > >
            >
          • ted.wrinch
            I haven t read Lachman s book, so I wonder if he mentions this aspect, and if the taint is justified. Actually, Lachman makes quite a significant point in
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 15, 2011
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              " I haven't read Lachman's book, so I
              wonder if he mentions this aspect, and if the "taint" is justified."

              Actually, Lachman makes quite a significant point in this area. He says that occultism took a lurch to the right towards the end of the C19 but previously was neither left nor right but just part of the thought of the age - consider Newton's astrology; the work by Cosimo de Medici with Marsilio Ficino translating Plato and then Hermes Trimesgistos etc. The notion we have now of occult knowledge as on the margins or forbidden was not one shared by the mainstream for the majority of our history and only became what it is through the rise of modernity during the C19. He says that James Webb's The Occult Establishment, a book often mentioned approvingly by Der Staudi, got him interested in this notion. Interestingly, Webb killed himself in 1980, at the young age of 34; Lachman says we don't know the cause of this but there are suggestions that the confident, 'skeptical rationalism' displayed in his book may have begun to slip and contributed to a degree of mental unbalance.

              T.

              Ted Wrinch

              --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "Frank Thomas Smith" <fts.trasla@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "ted.wrinch" <ted.wrinch@> wrote:
              > >
              > > I don't know if anyone's read anything by Mr Lachman but I've been dipping into "Politics and the Occult: The Left, the Right, and the Radically Unseen " and I'm rather impressed. He has a good understanding of his material, backed up with comprehensive references. For example, on the subject of the importance of tradition in the occult he quotes from Julius Evola's 'Ride the tiger: a survival manual for aristocrats of the soul' where Evola decries what he sees as the damaging influence of jazz on tradition. Lachman then cleverly switches to the left and quotes from Theodore Adorno's 'Dialectic of enlightenment', where Adorno decries the influence of the 'culture industry' in keeping the masses docile through pandering to and even creating tastes through things like jazz.
              > _________
              >
              > Hi Ted,
              > Evola is unfortunately tainted by fascism and anti-semitism: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julius_Evola . I haven't read Lachman's book, so I wonder if he mentions this aspect, and if the "taint" is justified. His biography of Rudolf Steiner is, imo, nicely written in the sense of being free of academicisms. Jazz as not a popular musical phenomenon for those guys; Marie Steiner also criticized it, probably reflecting Rudolf's distaste as well. But none of those people knew much or anything about jazz. The word was more likely a symbol for Adorno's "culture industry."
              > ______
              >
              > <snip>
              >
              >
              > >
              > T: As we all know, Der Staudi has many times described himself as an 'intellectual democrat' who believes everyone, with a bit of reading and perhaps thought (though probably mostly reading), can contribute to public discussion and 'knowledge formation'. Der Staudi is such a liar and fraud!
              >
              > F: I don't know about that, but his thinking is certainly consistent with his present Jesuit ambiance.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > >
              > > T.
              > >
              > > Ted Wrinch
              > >
              >
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