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Re: Bach's Grail Castle

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  • ted.wrinch
    He has said significant things about music, just not in any great volume ( especially compared to his general voluminousness!). One quote I found recently
    Message 1 of 37 , May 2 1:41 PM
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      He has said significant things about music, just not in any great volume ( especially compared to his general voluminousness!). One quote I found recently seems significant:

      Music is able to portray this Christ Impulse musically, in tones that are inwardly permeated with spirit. If music allows itself to be inspired by Spiritual Science, it will find ways of expressing the Christ Impulse, for it will reveal purely artistically and intuitively how the Christ Impulse in the Cosmos and the Earth can be awakened symphonically in tones.
      To this end we only need to be able to deepen our experience of the sphere of the major third by an inner enrichment of musical experience that penetrates into the hidden depths of feeling. If we experience the sphere of the major third as something wholly enclosed within the inner being of man and if we then feel the sphere of the major fifth to have the characteristic of "enveloping," so that, as we grow into the configuration of the fifth, we reach the boundary of the human and the cosmic, where the cosmic resounds into the sphere of the human and the human, consumed with longing, yearns to rush forth into the Cosmos, then, in the mystery enacted between the spheres of the major third and major fifth, we can experience musically something of the inner being of man that reaches out into the Cosmos.
      And if we then succeed in setting free the dissonances of the seventh to echo cosmic life, where the dissonances express man's sentient experiences in the Cosmos as he journeys towards the various spiritual realms; and if we succeed in allowing the dissonances of the seventh to die away, so that through their dying fall they acquire a certain definition, then in their dying strains they are ultimately resolved in something which, to the musical ear, resembles a musical firmament.
      If, then, having already given a subtle indication of the experience of the `minor' with the `major,' if, in the dying strains of the dissonances of the seventh, in this spontaneous re-creation of the dissonances into a totality, we find here a means of passing in an intensely minor mood from the dissonances of the seventh, from the near consonance of these diminishing dissonances to the sphere of the fifth in a minor mood, and from that point blend the sphere of the fifth with that of the minor third, then we shall have evoked in this way the musical experience of the Incarnation, and what is more, of the Incarnation of the Christ.
      In feeling our way outwards into the sphere of the seventh, which to cosmic feeling is only apparently dissonant and that we fashion into a `firmament,' in that it is seemingly supported by the octave, if we have grasped this with our feelings and retrace our steps in the manner already indicated and find how, in the embryonic form of the consonances of the minor third, there is a possibility of giving a musical representation of the Incarnation, then, when we retrace our steps to the major third in this sphere, the "Hallelujah" of the Christ can ring out from this musical configuration as pure music.
      Then, within the configuration of the tones man will be able to conjure forth an immediate realization of the supersensible and express it musically.
      The Christ Impulse can be found in music. And the dissolution of the symphonic into near dissonance, as in Beethoven, can be redeemed by a return to the dominion of the cosmic in music. Bruckner attempted this within the narrow limits of a traditional framework. But his posthumous Symphony shows that he could not escape these limitations. On one hand we admire its greatness, but on the other hand we find a hesitant approach to the true elements of music, and a failure to achieve a full realization of these elements which can only be experienced in the way I have described, i.e. when we have made strides in the realm of pure music and discover therein the essence, the fundamental spirit which can conjure forth a world through tones.

      (True and False Paths in Spiritual Investigation, 1924)

      T.

      Ted Wrinch
      --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "bikhe hozho" <hozhonahasglii@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Charlotte:
      >
      > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "Charlie" <charlottecowell@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Wonderful suggestion thank you, I shall listen to this with care now.
      > >
      > > I've heard something else said about Bach in the esoteric context, I'll see if I can find the reference - I have a feeling it's from The Zelator but not sure as yet. At any rate the magical properties of music are definitely highlighted in this book, and of course music is well known to be God's preferred form of devotion, an amazing method of communication and commune.
      > >
      > > What (if anything) did RS have to say about Orpheus, was he spoken of in his analysis of the ancient mysteries?
      >
      >
      >
      > SRC - Not much, as far as I've been able to tell. Orpheus is also an initiatory figure of the UnderWorld, a most taboo aspect of Western occultism - and anthroposophy, too. Like: what happened on Easter Saturday and -how- did Christ get resurrected? The Saturn Mysteries of the Far West are all over that, but....
      >
      > Really too bad Steiner didn't say too much about music; maybe he was tone-deaf. He could have said volumes about Bach, all he did say was some minor stuff about the configuration of the Bach family ear. wow.
      >
      > Stephen
      >
    • bikhe hozho
      You must be the only person in the whole wide world who _ever_ thought Margaret Thatcher was hot. Geez, Frank. You re slipping. Stephen
      Message 37 of 37 , May 4 6:00 PM
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        You must be the only person in the whole wide world who _ever_ thought Margaret Thatcher was hot. Geez, Frank. You're slipping.

        Stephen



        --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "Frank Thomas Smith" <fts.trasla@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, Charlotte Cowell <charlottecowell@> wrote:
        > >
        > > ha ha, well I like Helen but no, she is nothing like me :-)
        >
        > Hmmm. How about Margaret Thatcher?
        >
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