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Re: Allan Bloom (was: yap)

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  • Kim
    A few quotes from Allan Bloom:Only Socrates knew, after a lifetime of unceasing labor, that he was ignorant. Now every high-school student knows that. How did
    Message 1 of 37 , Mar 29, 2011
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      A few quotes from Allan Bloom:
      Only Socrates knew, after a lifetime of unceasing labor, that he was ignorant. Now every high-school student knows that. How did it become so easy? 

      As soon as tradition has come to be recognized as tradition, it is dead. 

      Education is the movement from darkness to light. 

      Fathers and mothers have lost the idea that the highest aspiration they might have for their children is for them to be wise... specialized competence and success are all that they can imagine.

      Reason cannot establish values, and its belief that it can is the stupidiest and most pernicious illusion.

      Students now arrive at the university ignorant and cynical about our political heritage, lacking the wherewithal to be either inspired by it or seriously critical of it.

      The failure to read good books both enfeebles the vision and strengthens our most fatal tendency - the belief that the here and now is all there is. 

      The liberally educated person is one who is able to resist the easy and preferred answers, not because he is obstinate but because he knows others worthy of consideration. 

      There is no real teacher who in practice does not believe in the existence of the soul, or in a magic that acts on it through speech. 

      There is one thing a professor can be absolutely certain of: almost every student entering the university believes, or says he believes, that truth is relative.
      Kim

      --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "elfuncle" <elfuncle@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "Kim" kimgm@ wrote:
      > >
      > > There is a book by Allan Bloom: "The Closing of the American Mind".
      >
      > I have that book on my shelf. Allan Bloom (1930 – October 7, 1992)
      > was an American scholar of the Greek classics, and he made the most
      > commonly used English translation of Plato's Republic from the original
      > Greek -- a translation recommended by Professor David Roochnik in his
      > TTC lecture course on The Republic.
      >
      > I was introduced to "The Closing of the American Mind" about 24 years
      > ago when I was selling Encyclopaedia Britannica in Houston, because the
      > sister product to go with it was "Great Books of the Western World," a
      > multi-volume publication featuring all the most influential thinkers of
      > the West, endorsed and recommended by Allan Bloom.
      >
      > One thing that strikes me about the mind-set promoted by Bloom is that
      > it's symptomatic of the Anglo-American culture in general, namely to
      > stick with everything that is old: Go back to Plato, back to Moses, back
      > to the early church, back to the good old days. And Bloom laments the
      > fact that European students don't share the same enthusiasm for
      > antiquity -- and he seems to imply a desire to revive the good old days
      > -- that he is hoping to find in America. But I think we wish to move on.
      > Of course we should familiarize ourselves with the past, with
      > pre-history and antiquity and the middle ages and so on, but there's no
      > reason to go back to it. Many Americans, however, regard themselves as
      > modern-day Romans, which is why there is a great concern these days
      > about the fall of the Roman Empire.
      >
      > One of the most amusing parts of "The Closing of the American Mind" is
      > where Bloom comes with long angry tirades against Mick Jagger. (This was
      > written in the eighties.) His reaction seems to be prompted byh the fact
      > that his students liked The Rolling Stones, and he thought this was very
      > terrible and threatened to destroy civilization.
      >
      > Anyway, I may return to the topic of this type of scholarship if I get
      > the time.
      >
      > Tarjei
      >
    • Kim
      A few quotes from Allan Bloom:Only Socrates knew, after a lifetime of unceasing labor, that he was ignorant. Now every high-school student knows that. How did
      Message 37 of 37 , Mar 29, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        A few quotes from Allan Bloom:
        Only Socrates knew, after a lifetime of unceasing labor, that he was ignorant. Now every high-school student knows that. How did it become so easy? 

        As soon as tradition has come to be recognized as tradition, it is dead. 

        Education is the movement from darkness to light. 

        Fathers and mothers have lost the idea that the highest aspiration they might have for their children is for them to be wise... specialized competence and success are all that they can imagine.

        Reason cannot establish values, and its belief that it can is the stupidiest and most pernicious illusion.

        Students now arrive at the university ignorant and cynical about our political heritage, lacking the wherewithal to be either inspired by it or seriously critical of it.

        The failure to read good books both enfeebles the vision and strengthens our most fatal tendency - the belief that the here and now is all there is. 

        The liberally educated person is one who is able to resist the easy and preferred answers, not because he is obstinate but because he knows others worthy of consideration. 

        There is no real teacher who in practice does not believe in the existence of the soul, or in a magic that acts on it through speech. 

        There is one thing a professor can be absolutely certain of: almost every student entering the university believes, or says he believes, that truth is relative.
        Kim

        --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "elfuncle" <elfuncle@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "Kim" kimgm@ wrote:
        > >
        > > There is a book by Allan Bloom: "The Closing of the American Mind".
        >
        > I have that book on my shelf. Allan Bloom (1930 – October 7, 1992)
        > was an American scholar of the Greek classics, and he made the most
        > commonly used English translation of Plato's Republic from the original
        > Greek -- a translation recommended by Professor David Roochnik in his
        > TTC lecture course on The Republic.
        >
        > I was introduced to "The Closing of the American Mind" about 24 years
        > ago when I was selling Encyclopaedia Britannica in Houston, because the
        > sister product to go with it was "Great Books of the Western World," a
        > multi-volume publication featuring all the most influential thinkers of
        > the West, endorsed and recommended by Allan Bloom.
        >
        > One thing that strikes me about the mind-set promoted by Bloom is that
        > it's symptomatic of the Anglo-American culture in general, namely to
        > stick with everything that is old: Go back to Plato, back to Moses, back
        > to the early church, back to the good old days. And Bloom laments the
        > fact that European students don't share the same enthusiasm for
        > antiquity -- and he seems to imply a desire to revive the good old days
        > -- that he is hoping to find in America. But I think we wish to move on.
        > Of course we should familiarize ourselves with the past, with
        > pre-history and antiquity and the middle ages and so on, but there's no
        > reason to go back to it. Many Americans, however, regard themselves as
        > modern-day Romans, which is why there is a great concern these days
        > about the fall of the Roman Empire.
        >
        > One of the most amusing parts of "The Closing of the American Mind" is
        > where Bloom comes with long angry tirades against Mick Jagger. (This was
        > written in the eighties.) His reaction seems to be prompted byh the fact
        > that his students liked The Rolling Stones, and he thought this was very
        > terrible and threatened to destroy civilization.
        >
        > Anyway, I may return to the topic of this type of scholarship if I get
        > the time.
        >
        > Tarjei
        >
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