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Pythagoras

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  • dottie zold
    Oh boy! Okay here we go again...I just do not have time for this...and how do I even have this book....and unread of course....whew   Kees, because I was
    Message 1 of 173 , Sep 11, 2009
      Oh boy! Okay here we go again...I just do not have time for this...and how do I even have this book....and unread of course....whew
       
      Kees, because I was looking for this darn book on East and West I found a book on Pythagoris written by Edouarde Schure...and in there is the name of the lady we were looking for earlier....now interestingly enough...it seems the daughter of this union is more in character with Marie Steiner and her legacy of being left books by Rudolf Steiner and to maintain control over them...Pythagoris' daughter, did you know he had a daughter?!, I did not, the name of the daughter is Damo....it almost looks like a Rudolf Steiner, Ita Wegman, Marie Steiner....interesting.Wait till you hear this;
       
      "Among the women who followed the master's teaching was a maiden of great beauty. Her father, an inhabitant of Croton,(you know...I just came across some strange name like this when looking at one of the personalities we were just looking at...darn)  was named Brontinos,. His daughter's name was Theano. Pythagoras was now sixty years of age, but mastery over passion and a pure life wholly consecrated to his mission, had kept him in perfect health and strength. The youth of the soul, that immortal flame the great initiate draws from his spiritiual life and nourishes on the hidden forces of nature, shone forth in him, throwing into subjection all around. The Grecian mage was not at the decline, but rather at the height of his might. Theano was attracted to Pythagoras by the almost supernatural radiance emanating from his person. Grave and reserved, she had sought from the master an explanation of the mysteries she loved though without understanding them. When, however, beneath the light of truth and the tender glow which gradually enveloped her, she felt her inmost soul expand like the mystic rose with its thousand petals, when she felt that his blossoming forth came from him and his words - she silently conceived for the master a boundless enthusiasm and a passionate love.
       
      Pythagoras had made no effort to attract her. His love and affection were bestowed on all his disciples; he thought only of his school, of Greece and the future of the world. Like many great adepts, he had denied himself the pleasures of earthly love to devote himself to his work. The magic of his will, the spiritual possession of so many souls he had formed and who remained devoted to him as to a well loved father, the mystic incense of all those unexpressed affections which came to him, and that exquisite fragrance of human sympathy which bound together the Pythagorean brethren - all this took the place of voluptousness, of human happiness and love. One day, as he was alone, meditating on the future of his school in the crypt of Prosperine, he saw coming to him, with grave, resolute steps this beautiful virgin to whom he had never spoken in private. She sank on her knees at his feet, and with downcast eyes begged the master - the one one who could do everything ! - to set her free from an impossible, an unhappy love which was consuming her, body and soul. Pythagoras wished to know the name of hte one she loved. After much hesitation, Theano confessed that it was himself, but that, ready for any sacrifice, she would submit to his will. Pythagoras made no reply. Encouraged by his silence, she raised her head with suppliant look. Her eyes seemed to contain the very essence of a life and soul offered as a sacrafice to the master.
       
      The sage was greatly disturbed; he could overcome his senses and imagination, but the electric flash from that soul has pierced his own. In this virgin, matured by passion, her countanence transifigured by a sentiment of utter devotion, he had found his companion, and caught a faint glimpse of a more complete realization of his work. With troubled look, Pythagoras raised the maiden to her feet, and Theano saw from the master's eyes that their destinies were forever united.
       
      By his marriage with Theano, Pythagoras affixed the seal of realization to his work. The union and fusion of the two lives was complete. One day when the master's wife was asked what length of time elasped before a woman could become pure after intercourse with a man, she replied: 'if it is with her husband, she is pure all the time; if wtih another man, she is never pure.' Many women would smilingly remark that to give such a reply one must be the wife of Pythagoras, and love him as Theano did.
       
      And they would be in the right, for it is not marriage which sanctifies love, it is love which sanctifies marriage. Theano entered so thoroughly into the thought and life of her husband, that after his death she became the center for the Pythagoras order, and a Greek author quotes her opinion as that of an authority on the doctrine of Numbers. She bore Pythagoras two sons, Arimnestes, and Telauges, and a daughter Damo. At a later date Telaugas became the master of Empedocles, to whom he handed down the secrets of the doctrine.
       
      The family of Pythagoras offered the order a real model to follow. His house was called the Temple of Ceres, adn his court the Temple of the Muses. In domestic and religious festivals, the mother led the women's chorus, and Damo that of the maidens. In all respects Damo was worthy of her parents. Pythagorass entrusted to her certain writings expressly forbidding her to communicate them to anyone outside the family. After the dispersion of the Pythagoreans, Damo fell into great poverty. She was offered a large sum for the precious manuscript, but, faithful to her father's will, she always refused to part with it."
       
      Dottie: Now, the bolded part is mine but the italics are from the Mr. Schure. I did that as it did not hit me the first time but the second time it did. I think one can also find the son of Pythagoras during Steiner's time in relations to Rudolf Steiner. I guess more research will have to be done on Telaugus............anyhow...
       
      On the back cover we have this:
       
      " Pythagoras crossed the whole of the ancient world before giving his message to Greece. He saw Africa and Asia, Memphis and Babylon, along with their methods of initiation and political life. His own troubled life resembles a ship driving through a storm, pursuing its course, with sails unfurled, a symbol of strength and calmness in the midst of furious elements. His teachings convey the impression of a cool, fragrant night after the bitter fire and passion of an angry, blood stained day. They call to mind the beauty of the firmament unrolling, by degrees, its sparkling archepelagoes and ethereal harmonies over the head of a seer. With these pages find both the life and teachings of Pythagoras without the obscurities of legend and the prejudices of the schools alike."
      Dottie: You know what's interesting, besides every friekn thing!  is that I am recalling that someone called Rudolf Steiner to a past incarnation of his by calling out a name or something,  he relates this somewhere....and I am almost wondering if it was Schure...this little passage, the only one I have just read as when I looked in the part of the contents of the book I saw 'Marriage of Pythagoras'...I was thinking it was a Sophia thing or something and was surprised to read of a real marriage and also children.
       
      Another interesting thought is that in the biographies of Ita Wegmen, Emmichoven, and a few others we find some reallly interesting reminences about various parts of the world they found themselves visiting and how much it mean to them and what unfolded for them....I am thinking it is a possibility that Pythagoras and Steiner are one and the same...and I almost think that sometimes if certain personalities were made known of his, he would have also clearly outed those around him....I think that must have been a consideration of his when letting certain things be known and certain others not....I think ...well, I'll wait till I do a little more research that I really have no time for but I am told that either I can look for things of time or things of eternities and that the things of the physical world are not the first on the list as they will be fulfilled by the other requirements when taking spirit in consideration first...I guess that's the dilemma of trust and truth....
       
      Thanks Kees....i think....d

      "If there is something more powerful than destiny, this must be the human being who bears destiny unshaken." Rudolf Steiner

    • dottie zold
      Doctors doing studies. One of them in the last year on Oprah Winfrey. Pretty interesting that little by little these things are becoming known. Not only that
      Message 173 of 173 , Nov 25, 2009
        Doctors doing studies. One of them in the last year on Oprah Winfrey. Pretty interesting that little by little these things are becoming known. Not only that but to hear regular conversations of people 'thinking' instead of repeating, we find the same considerations when talking about the heart and its functions. Suddenly it is making more sense to people in general that maybe its not just a pump when taking into consideration what came first, the chicken or the egg. Doctors following the embryo are beginning to verfy little by little Rudolf Steiner's considerations from over a hundred years ago when they didn't have the equipment they do now.
         
        All good things Peter,
        Dottie

        "If there is something more powerful than destiny, this must be the human being who bears destiny unshaken." Rudolf Steiner

        --- On Wed, 11/25/09, leroypatter <leroypatter@...> wrote:

        From: leroypatter <leroypatter@...>
        Subject: [anthroposophy_tomorrow] Re: Mr. Dugan and Ms. Winters
        To: anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Wednesday, November 25, 2009, 12:50 PM

        "not only are doctors coming the understanding that the heart is not a pump"

        Hi, really interested about where this information comes from?

        Thanks,

        Pete.

        --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "elfuncle" <coolvibes@...> wrote:
        >
        > Careful there, Dottie -- if Dan & Di & other holefolks are forced to admit anything like this, through double blind heart tests or whatever -- they'll argue that this is the case among anthroposophists only, because anthroposophists, eurythmists, mantra chanters, Akasha travellers, child hypnotizers, abusers, predators, Steinerites, Blavatskyites and Waldorf staff are all hairy primates disguised as humans through special costumes designed in the Goetheanum Basement. The Good doctor and his cohorts were wearing such costumes themselves, and all anthros are alien beasts; their blood is probably Vulcan green, and their hearts are located elsewhere in their bodies.... just like Spock.
        >
        > Tarjei
        >
        > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, dottie zold <dottie_z@> wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > So whadaya think about this? Now, not only are doctors coming the understanding that the heart is not a pump, so too do we now have evidence, (again) of humans being a separate line from the animals and that man did not originate from apes. d
        > >  
        > > Fossils radically alter ideas about the look of man's earliest ancestors
        > >
        > >
        > > Analysis of a near-complete skeleton of a human ancestor found in Ethiopia changes scientists' thinking about the appearance and behavior of our distant forebears.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > 
        > > This image released today by "Science" shows the probable life appearance in anterior view of Ardipithecus ramidus ("Ardi").
        > >
        > >  
        > >
        > > A treasure trove of 4.4-million-year-old fossils from the Ethiopian desert is dramatically overturning widely held ideas about the early evolution of humans and how they came to walk upright, even as it paints a remarkably detailed picture of early life in Africa, researchers reported Thursday.
        > >
        > > The centerpiece of the diverse collection of primate, animal and plant fossils is the near-complete skeleton of a human ancestor that demonstrates our earliest forebears looked nothing like a chimpanzee or other large primate, as is now commonly believed. Instead, the findings suggest that the last common ancestor of humans and primates, which existed nearly 2 million years earlier, was a primitive creature that shared few traits with modern-day members of either group.
        > >
        > > The findings, analyzed in a large group of studies published Thursday in the journal Science, also indicate that our ancestors began walking upright in woodlands, not on grassy savannas as prior generations of researchers had speculated.
        > >
        > > The discovery of the specimen called Ardipithecus ramidus "is one of the most important discoveries for the study of human evolution," said paleoanthropologist David Pilbeam of Harvard University, who was not involved in the research. "The find itself is extraordinary, as were the enormous labors that went into the reconstruction of a skeleton shattered almost beyond repair," he said in an e-mailed statement.
        > >
        > > "It is so rare to get a more or less complete skeleton," said paleoanthropologist Andrew Hill of Yale University. "In the entire course of human evolution, at least until you get to Neanderthals, there are only three to four available. We can always tell so much more from a skeleton" than from the jawbones and skulls that are more commonly found.
        > >
        > > The fossils described in the new studies were found 15 years ago in the Afar Triangle of Ethiopia by a team led by paleoanthropologist Tim White of UC Berkeley. But White and his team have been relatively closemouthed about the fossils, and other researchers -- some of whom have accused him of hoarding the fossils for his own use -- have been eagerly awaiting more information.
        > >
        > > Today, they are getting a surfeit: Eleven papers by 47 authors, and a similar number of short summaries prepared by each paper's authors.
        > >
        > > The fossils were found in a layer of sediment sandwiched between two layers of volcanic ash, each dating from 4.4 million years ago -- indicating that the fossils are also of that age.
        > >
        > > In addition to the nearly complete fossil specimen of the female primate, which investigators have dubbed Ardi, the team found more than 100 fossils from 36 other members of the same species.
        > >
        > > "These fossils are much more important than Lucy," the 3.2-million-year-old specimen of Australopithecus afarensis that was found in the Afar desert in the 1970s, said paleoanthropologist Alan Walker of Pennsylvania State University, who was not involved in the research. "The reason is that when Lucy was found, we already knew the major features of Australopithecus from fossils found in the 1940s. . . . These fossils are of a completely unknown creature, and are much stranger and more primitive than Australopithecus."
        > >
        > > The White team also found fossils of 29 species of birds, primarily small ones like doves, lovebirds, mousebirds, passerines and swifts, as well as several that were previously unknown. Animal fossils included 20 new species of small mammals, including shrews, bats, rodents, hares and small carnivores, as well as larger animals, including baboons, colobus monkeys and spiral-horned antelopes.
        > >
        > > Fossilized wood, seed and other plant remains indicate the presence of hackberry, fig and palm trees. Collectively, these finds indicate that the environment was more humid and cooler than it is today, and contained grassy woodland with forest patches.
        > >
        > > Today, the Afar is a desert. But go back in a time machine and "4.4 million years ago, this was really a different world," White said. "We look up in the trees and we see that they are full of monkeys. We look around on the ground and we see that there are a lot of kudus. And we see an occasional hyena. And we see elephants and we see lots of small mammals."
        > >
        > > This whole collection of data "gives us information we have never had before about human evolution," said paleoanthropologist C. Owen Lovejoy of Kent State University, one of the primary authors of the papers. "The whole savanna theory goes out the window in terms of it being the explanation for upright walking. . . . And the idea that we evolved from something like a chimpanzee also goes out the window."
        > >
        > > Ardi stood about 47 inches tall and probably weighed 110 pounds. Many researchers previously believed that such an early ancestor would, like modern chimps, be a knuckle-walker, using the knuckles for support while moving on all fours. Instead, Ardi appears to have climbed on all fours on branches, but walked upright on the ground. Her feet, like those of monkeys but not chimps, were designed more for propulsion than for grasping.
        > >
        > > Her face had a projecting muzzle, giving her an ape-like appearance, but many features of her skull, such as the ridge above the eye socket, are quite different than those of chimpanzees. Her brain is about the same size as Lucy's.
        > >
        > > Her hands lacked many of the specializations that allow modern-day African apes to swing, hang and easily move through trees. Those specializations apparently evolved in large primates after they separated from the last common ancestor with humans more than 6 million years ago. (Few fossils of such primates are available because they lived primarily in forests, which are not conducive to preservation of bone.)
        > >
        > > The finds "are turning evolution on its head," Lovejoy said.
        > >
        > > The most controversial aspects of the papers involve the authors' -- particularly Lovejoy's -- interpretations of what the fossils say about behavior. Of particular importance, he said, is that the sizes of males and females were about the same, and that the specimens do not have large, sharp canine teeth. Both findings suggest that the fierce, often violent competition among males for females in heat that characterizes gorillas and chimpanzees was absent in Ardipithecus.
        > >
        > > That implies, Lovejoy concluded, that the males were beginning to enter into monogamous relationships with females and devoted more time to caring for their young than did earlier ancestors.
        > >
        > > "This is a restatement of Owen Lovejoy's ideas going back almost three decades, which I found unpersuasive then and still do," Pilbeam said.
        > >
        > > Hill was more blunt, calling Lovejoy's speculation "patent nonsense."
        > >
        > > thomas.maugh@
        > >
        > >
        > > "If there is something more powerful than destiny, this must be the human being who bears destiny unshaken." Rudolf Steiner
        > >
        >




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