Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Rudolf Steiner

Expand Messages
  • Frank Thomas Smith
    ... F: Depends what you mean by mystic . From Greek mustikos = initiated person. By that definition, Steiner certainly was a mustic...er...mystic. D:
    Message 1 of 43 , Jul 7, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "dick.richardson@..." <dick.richardson@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Rudolf Steiner
      >
      >
      >
      > Never read Rudolf Steiner for I was not interested, all I ever read was
      > a wee bit about him some place. But from what I did read it struck me
      > that Steiner was not a mystic but a philosophical writer about mysticism
      > who had met a real mystic on a train, was impressed and then carried on
      > along those lines – excuse the pun; intended :- )
      >

      F: Depends what you mean by "mystic". From Greek "mustikos" = initiated person. By that definition, Steiner certainly was a mustic...er...mystic.

      D: > However, OK, and most writers about mysticism and transcendence were not
      > mystics, but of a similar ilk of academic writer. Generally speaking
      > mystics do not write. But they can soon tell who is and who is not one,
      > and that is all too easy. But if any academic does write about mystics
      > and mysticism and makes a good job it (a few have but not many) then
      > that is fine, so long as they put folks in the picture and let them know
      > the truth of their stance and position. I have had lots of arguments and
      > fights about this over the last forty years. Also syncretism does not
      > help the cause if they also delve into that bag of nauseating mess. Just
      > tell it as it is and then quit waffling.

      Steiner did not waffle. He was a self-proclaimed initiate and preferred his syncrenitic waffles with chocolate ice cream and sprinkles.

      Frank
    • Frank Thomas Smith
      ... F: Depends what you mean by mystic . From Greek mustikos = initiated person. By that definition, Steiner certainly was a mustic...er...mystic. D:
      Message 43 of 43 , Jul 7, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "dick.richardson@..." <dick.richardson@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > Rudolf Steiner
        >
        >
        >
        > Never read Rudolf Steiner for I was not interested, all I ever read was
        > a wee bit about him some place. But from what I did read it struck me
        > that Steiner was not a mystic but a philosophical writer about mysticism
        > who had met a real mystic on a train, was impressed and then carried on
        > along those lines – excuse the pun; intended :- )
        >

        F: Depends what you mean by "mystic". From Greek "mustikos" = initiated person. By that definition, Steiner certainly was a mustic...er...mystic.

        D: > However, OK, and most writers about mysticism and transcendence were not
        > mystics, but of a similar ilk of academic writer. Generally speaking
        > mystics do not write. But they can soon tell who is and who is not one,
        > and that is all too easy. But if any academic does write about mystics
        > and mysticism and makes a good job it (a few have but not many) then
        > that is fine, so long as they put folks in the picture and let them know
        > the truth of their stance and position. I have had lots of arguments and
        > fights about this over the last forty years. Also syncretism does not
        > help the cause if they also delve into that bag of nauseating mess. Just
        > tell it as it is and then quit waffling.

        Steiner did not waffle. He was a self-proclaimed initiate and preferred his syncrenitic waffles with chocolate ice cream and sprinkles.

        Frank
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.