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Southern Cross Review.org Nr. 63

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  • Frank Thomas Smith
    Dear A_Ters, Southern Cross Review Nr. 63 has just landed on your cyber-doorstep http://SouthernCrossReview.org We offer several contributions about Israel and
    Message 1 of 79 , Jan 28, 2009
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      Dear A_Ters,
      Southern Cross Review Nr. 63 has just landed on your cyber-doorstep
      http://SouthernCrossReview.org
      We offer several contributions about Israel and Palestine in this
      issue, the most prominent being in Features: an animated book and film
      by Ari Folman, who took part in the Israeli invasion of Lebanon when
      he was 19 years old. It's synchronicity with the current situation in
      Gaza is obvious. Not to be missed!

      In the Editor's Page we try to analyze the same situation - and an
      Israeli, Naom Sharon, tells us about the Israeli reaction to Barack
      Obama's election. Also under Features Tom Englehardt reviews the
      destruction wrought by Bush and Co. and wonders what should be done
      about it. Mike Ingles describes the progress in race relations in
      small-town USA.
      Current events includes articles by Anand Gopal about the history and
      reality of Afghanistan; Arundhati Roy of "The God of Small Things"
      fame, writes about the Mumbai terrorist attack and its relation to the
      India-Pakistan conflictive situation; and Michael Lewis gives us the
      lowdown on Wall Street.
      One of my all-time favorite James Thurber stories is reproduced under
      Fiction for the benefit of our younger readers who may never have
      heard of him. There's also a bilingual fantasy by yours-truly lurking
      there.
      Under Anthroposophy Keith Francis, the author of Alchemy and
      Anthroposophy, which by the way is now available as an e-book, brings
      us the first lecture in his Evolution of Consciousness series. The
      third lecture in Rudolf Steiner's Genesis lectures appears and well as
      the continuation of his Anthroposophical Guidelines.
      In the Science section Graig Holdrege, in his usual erudite style,
      appeals for a new understanding of genes and life.
      Stanley Fish reviews what he considers to be the 10 best American
      movies ever. Your editor doesn't quite agree with him. What do you think?
      Poems by Walt Whitman, Maricel Mendiguibel and Jeanpaul Ferro bring up
      the rear.
      Enjoy!
      Frank
      Frank Thomas Smith
      http://SouthernCrossReview.org
    • write3chairs
      ... I like this, Mike. What is interesting to me is how there is so much potential for depth in these conversations, if only we would ask the right questions,
      Message 79 of 79 , Feb 17, 2009
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        --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "Mike helsher" wrote:

        > Tarjei wrote:
        >
        > So it's much better to poke them with images and poetry...
        >
        > Mike:
        >
        > Yeah, little me would love to poke them, like with a pool cue or
        > something. But etheric prodding is the best I can do right now with a
        > poem I wrote that was inspired by my communications with the hole:
        >
        > Dim Wits
        > How dim are our wits compared to light itself?
        > Little pieces and bits that think that they think,
        > But not so do they ever think to shrink!
        >
        > The plant dies and returns to the ground,
        > Nurturing that from which it came,
        > And seeds! Oh glories seeds!
        > The wombs of our wits!
        >
        > My wit grows a picture unknown to the body,
        > Though charged with it,
        > Feeling arises, charges, vibrates, lives!
        >
        > Life, beautiful life! streaming in all directions!
        > Lighting all the wits that are dim -
        > That think only within, though light is ever flowing,
        > Encasing in a shell, creating a fragment:
        > A pin-prick on the Sun; the Sun a pin-prick in space!
        > And all that we are is dim, though buzzing with noise.
        > Chattering voices talking only to themselves,
        > Like a wound-up mechanical monkey:
        > Cymbals clanging never wondering who does the winding;
        > Never the eternity dreaming between the clangs!
        >
        > Who builds the snowman in me? that melts into time
        > As do all things...
        > Why so melted and alone?
        > "My poor fool is hanged," there is no jest,
        > What do I hear? What do I see?
        > What do I touch, feel, think?
        > The lights are so dim - so dim!
        > And yetÂ… and yetÂ…
        >
        >
        > Best
        >
        > Mike

        I like this, Mike. What is interesting to me is
        how there is so much potential for depth in
        these conversations, if only we would ask the
        right questions, press the right buttons, tickle
        the right nerve, the one that opens the door
        to learning the answers we'd really like to know.

        Jennifer
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