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Re: History of AS (Witzenmann)

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  • Robert Mason
    ... Goetheanum until the sixties, because doing so would be recognizing the publisher s (estate-M. Steiner and her legal heirs) rights to them. Finally a
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 18, 2008
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      Frank wrote:

      >>Steiner's books were not sold in the
      Goetheanum until the sixties, because doing so
      would be recognizing the publisher's (estate-M.
      Steiner and her legal heirs) rights to them.
      Finally a Vorstand gave in on this point, but
      one of its members (Witzenmann) was so angry
      that he didn't go to meetings any more and was
      "furloughed".<<

      Robert writes:

      I suspect that this "furlough" was not merely
      about something so trivial. Remember Robert
      Jan Kelder from his brief foray into the Topica
      Constitution group? He seems to think that
      Witzenmann had some profound things to say, and
      his Willehalm Institute is promoting
      Witzenmann's work:

      "Named after Willehalm, the epos by the
      medieval Grail poet Wolfram von Eschenbach, the
      Institute was founded by Robert Jan Kelder in
      1985 in Arlesheim Switzerland to further the
      Grail research by Werner Greub, who has
      localized the Grail Castle in the Arlesheim
      Hermitage and identified Willehalm, the
      historical William of Orange, as Wolfram's
      Master Kyot. In 1986 the Institute moved to
      Amsterdam where it also started to further the
      work of Herbert Witzenmann and later that of
      Slobodan Mitric."

      RJK supports the research of Werner Greub,
      which was apparently dismissed by the Vorstand.
      Witzenmann was not involved in this dismissal,
      which might hint at some profound differences
      between him and the majority of the Vorstand at
      that time.

      RJK does think that Witzenmann had some
      important things to say, and gave ". . . .
      talks . . . the first one was entitled Social
      Organics – A Grail Impulse For The 21st Century
      during which a new edition of Herbert
      Witzenmann’s The Just Price – World Economy as
      Social Organics was presented. During the
      second talk Munsalvaesche in America – Towards
      The New Grail Community a new edition of
      Herbert Witzenmann’s social-aesthetic essay The
      Principles Of The Anthroposophical Society As A
      Basis Of Life And Path Of Training with a
      Foreword Introducing the Kardeiz Saga To Recall
      the Anthroposophical Society was presented."

      See the Willehalm Institute website;
      <http://www.willehalm.nl>

      A couple more snips:
      ". . . . May 18, 2008. Also appearing on this
      date on the occasion of the World Book Market
      in Amsterdam is a Dutch version of The Just
      Price – World Economy as Social Organics by the
      German anthroposophist and philosopher Herbert
      Witzenmann (1905 – 1988), which is a guide to
      realizing the Grail impulse for the 21st
      century: transforming the so-called invisible
      hand that holds the scepter over an ‘unholy’
      world economy into a righteous one by
      ‘resurrecting’ and realizing the medieval
      concept of ‘just price’ through economic
      associations."


      "For this epistemological distinction see
      Rudolf Steiner's Philosophy of Spiritual
      Activity and Herbert Witzenmann's social-
      aesthetic study Gestalten oder Verwalten /
      Rudolf Steiners Sozialorganik – ein neues
      Zivilisations-prinzip (Dornach, 1986) (To
      Create or Administrate – Rudolf Steiner's
      Social Organics/ A New Principle of
      Civilization) not yet translated."

      RM
    • Frank Thomas Smith
      ... Well, objecting to Steiner s books beng sold at the Goetheanum when the rest of the Vorstand and everyone else agreed they should be is hardly trivial. And
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 18, 2008
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        --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, Robert Mason
        <robertsmason_99@...> wrote:
        >
        > Frank wrote:
        >
        > >>Steiner's books were not sold in the
        > Goetheanum until the sixties, because doing so
        > would be recognizing the publisher's (estate-M.
        > Steiner and her legal heirs) rights to them.
        > Finally a Vorstand gave in on this point, but
        > one of its members (Witzenmann) was so angry
        > that he didn't go to meetings any more and was
        > "furloughed".<<
        >
        > Robert writes:
        >
        > I suspect that this "furlough" was not merely
        > about something so trivial. Remember Robert
        > Jan Kelder from his brief foray into the Topica
        > Constitution group? He seems to think that
        > Witzenmann had some profound things to say, and
        > his Willehalm Institute is promoting
        > Witzenmann's work:

        Well, objecting to Steiner's books beng sold at the Goetheanum when
        the rest of the Vorstand and everyone else agreed they should be is
        hardly trivial. And that was the reason for the furlough, although
        there may have been other reasons as well. No one doubted Witzenmann's
        brilliance and his work continued to be published, and he gave
        seminars (I attended one)in Dornach, though not in the Goetheanum. Btw
        Robert Kelder is an old friend of mine. I first met him in the
        Speisehaus when he discovered muesli, to which he was dedicated for life.
        Frank
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