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Re: RS about racial evolution

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  • holderlin66
    ... very ... http://wn.elib.com/Steiner/Lectures/19080904p01.html In the latter Atlantean time men were different one from another, some having retained a
    Message 1 of 57 , Apr 1 5:30 AM
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      --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "holderlin66"
      <holderlin66@h...> wrote:
      > Peter Staudenmaier's utter foolishness!
      >
      > "There is no such thing as going forward or backward in evolution.
      > When the notion of moving forward in evolution is directly tied to
      > race, this idea becomes racist. No race is more evolutionarily
      > advanced than any other race. To hold otherwise is to endorse a
      very
      > obvious variety of racism."

      http://wn.elib.com/Steiner/Lectures/19080904p01.html

      "In the latter Atlantean time men were different one from another,
      some having retained a high degree of clairvoyant ability. This
      faculty did not vanish suddenly, but was still present in many of
      the men who took part in the great migration from west to east. In
      others, however, it had already disappeared. There were advanced
      persons and retarded persons and, in accordance with the whole
      nature of evolution at that time, we can understand that the least
      advanced were those who were the most clairvoyant, for in a certain
      way they had remained stationary and had preserved the old Atlantean
      character. The most advanced were those who had already achieved a
      physical perceiving of the world, thus approaching our form of day-
      consciousness. It was they who, ceased to see the spiritual world
      clairvoyantly at night, and who during their waking hours saw
      objects with sharper contours. That little handful of whom we have
      already spoken, who were led by the greatest initiate (generally
      known as Manu*) and his pupils deep into Asia and thence fructified
      the other cultures, just this handful, being composed of the most
      advanced men of that time, first lost the ancient gift of
      clairvoyance for the ordinary relationships of life.

      For them the true day-consciousness, in which we see physical
      objects sharply contoured, became ever clearer. Their great leader
      led this group farthest into Asia, so that they could live in
      isolation; otherwise they would have come too closely in touch with
      other peoples who still preserved the old clairvoyance. Only because
      they remained separated from other peoples for a time could they
      grow into a new type of man. A colony was established in inner Asia,
      whence the great cultural streams could flow into the most varied
      peoples.

      Northern India was the first country to receive its new cultural
      current from this center. It has already been pointed out that these
      little groups of cultural pioneers nowhere found un-populated
      territory. Earlier still, before their great migration from west to
      east, there had been other wanderings, and whenever new stretches of
      land rose from the sea, they were peopled by the wanderers. The
      persons sent out from this colony in Asia had to mix with other
      peoples, all of whom were more backward than they who had been led
      by Manu. Among these other peoples were many persons who had
      retained the old clairvoyance.

      It was not the custom of the initiates to establish colonies as this
      is done today; they colonized in a different way. They knew that
      they had to start with the souls of the persons whom they met in the
      lands that were to be colonized. The emissaries did not impose what
      they had to say. They reckoned with what they found. A balance was
      reached that took into account the needs of the old inhabitants.
      This reckoned with their religious views, which were based on the
      memory of earlier epochs, and also with the old clairvoyant
      disposition. So it was natural that only a handful of the most
      advanced could develop true concepts. The great masses could form
      only ideas that were a sort of compromise between the old Atlantean
      and the post-Atlantean attitudes. Therefore, we find in all these
      countries, in India, in Persia, in Egypt, whenever the different
      post-Atlantean cultures appeared, religious ideas which for that age
      are less advanced, less cultivated; which are nothing but a sort of
      continuation of the old Atlantean ideas."
    • at@ael...
      Another difficult question that Peter Staudenmaier continues to run away from: cultural evolution. He has indignantly declared that natural selection does not
      Message 57 of 57 , Apr 22 3:25 PM
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        Another difficult question that Peter Staudenmaier continues to run away from: cultural evolution. He has indignantly declared that natural selection does not apply to cultures. I don't know why he thought anyone would claim such a thing. But he cannot explain if he feels cultures evolve at all, or how. Condescend to me, Peter. Try answering this.

        Daniel Hindes
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: at@ael...
        Sent: Wednesday, April 21, 2004 10:21 PM
        Subject: Re: [anthroposophy_tomorrow] RS about racial evolution

        Hi Daniel, you wrote:
        "So the human body evolved, and ideas evolve, but cultures (composed of bodies and ideas) don't evolve?"
         
        Peter Staudenmaier:
        Not by natural selection. If you believe that cultures evolve by natural selection, then I think you have an inadequate grasp of the concept. Cultures are neither genetic nor hereditary.
         
        Daniel:
        Peter, one of the first things you learn in Biology is that evolution does not equal natural selection. There are many theories of evolution. Relativly few of them involve natural selection as the method of evolution (though the generally accepted ones do). Your education might benefit from a few basic biology courses.
         
        Repeat: "Evolution does not equal natural selection."
         
        Good, now I hope that you won't misapply the methods of biology to culture (you of all people should know what a mess that creates).
         
        Back to my origional question:
        "So the human body evolved, and ideas evolve, but cultures (composed of bodies and ideas) don't evolve?"
        Note: I did not ask if cultures evolved through natural selection. I asked if they evolved at all by any mechanism.
         
        Daniel Hindes
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