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Re: think piece: Is the Internet good or bad for the Consciousness Soul?

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  • Robert Mason
    ... working to teach me how to use the internet. One great difference between a spiritual man and a less spiritual one is that the first sees processes and the
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 10 12:12 PM
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      To Albert Sándor, who wrote:

      >>Nice thoughts. I see how my karma has been
      working to teach me how to use the internet.
      One great difference between a spiritual man
      and a less spiritual one is that the first sees
      processes and the intricate working of divine
      purpose in everything, while the other sees
      only their immediate effects, manifestations.<<

      Robert writes:

      There's a thought: the Internet is in our
      karma; it's in world-karma. Ahriman is in our
      karma; our increasingly Ahrimanic world is in
      our karma. Machinery is Ahrimanic; printing is
      Ahrimanic; electronics is Ahrimanic; and our
      computers are all the more Ahrimanic. And so
      it must be. And so it can be good for us, *if*
      we are *aware*. Living in the world of death,
      we can find our freedom -- and thus become
      beings of true love, which can manifest only in
      freedom. But only if we take this death in
      moderation.

      Albert Sándor wrote:

      >>I met many people who regard themselves as
      anthroposophists, while they can't pass their
      shallow, judgmental behaviour. Without my
      early passion to videogames, than through it,
      my passion towards computers, IT, I could never
      arrive to the independence where I am now. I
      own my own firm. I manage my own network. I
      have my employees, whom by their karma were
      lead to me, so we can help each other.

      >>Was this passion for virtual worlds
      beneficial ? Surely.<<

      Robert writes:

      Yes, there is another side to the picture of
      the general "dumbing down" of people in modern
      culture. A few years ago the book *Everything
      Bad is Good for You* came out. (Here are a few
      online reviews:

      <http://www.newyorker.com/archive/2005/05/16/050516crbo_books?printable=true>

      <http://kottke.org/05/05/everything-bad-is-good-for-you>

      <http://internetducttape.com/2008/01/04/book-review-everything-bad-is-good-for-you-by-steven-johnson>

      <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Everything_Bad_Is_Good_For_You>)

      This book presents evidence that modern
      electro-virtual culture is actually making us
      smarter. And in a way, I suppose that's true;
      there's a flip side of every coin. But smarter
      is not necessarily better. After all, Ahriman
      is supremely intelligent, but nevertheless is
      in futile detachment from and opposition to
      Reality. Our question is: how can we receive
      what we need from what Ahriman brings us
      without our being overwhelmed by too much of
      it?

      Albert Sándor wrote:

      >>Did it have also a dark, destructive side ?
      Most ceirtanly. While it was a great driving
      force, it also took a lot, and only recently I
      have been able to overcome it. I do not need it
      now, as I found my Will. But if there was not
      the lack of this Will, how could I have found
      it ?

      >>Those who judge others miss their karma.
      Indeed, adulterers and tax collectors often
      preceed the righteous. To err is good, to be
      slave of a strong passion, is good, as it takes
      you to hell, and only through hell we can
      rise.<<

      Robert writes:

      Well, yes . . . we all had to go through "the
      Fall" into the material world, and that's a
      kind of "hell", in relation to Heaven. And as
      Steiner said, only that which we have thought
      wrongly can we think correctly. But beware:
      "Nothing in excess; all things in moderation."

      Albert Sándor wrote:

      >>Surely there are people with better karmas,
      more spiritual, as I am only a beginner, but
      what do I care ? I have to walk my own path.

      >>We must be uncompromising with purselves, and
      forgiving with others. When we still do not
      know our own fate, how can we judge that of
      others' ?<<

      Robert writes:

      I can't think of a way to argue with that.
      Thanks for your thoughts.

      Robert Mason
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