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Rabbi Gamaliel & Paul + Christ in Judaism ...Can you see it?

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  • dottie zold
      [edit] In Acts of the Apostles The author of Acts of the Apostles (in 5:34-40), introduces Gamaliel as a Pharisee and celebrated scholar of the Mosaic
    Message 1 of 49 , Jun 6, 2008
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      [edit] In Acts of the Apostles

      The author of Acts of the Apostles (in 5:34-40), introduces Gamaliel as a Pharisee and celebrated scholar of the Mosaic Law. Citing past revolts based on the prophesied messiah such as Theudas and Judas of Galilee, Gamaliel advises his fellow members of the Sanhedrin not to put to death Saint Peter and the other apostles for preaching the Gospel, concluding "But if it be of God, ye will not be able to overthrow it; lest perhaps ye be found even to fight against God." His authority with his contemporaries was so great that they accepted his advice. Acts 22:3 identifies Gamaliel as the teacher of Saul of Tarsus.

      In Acts 22:3 St Paul tells a crowd in Jerusalem, "I am a Jew, born in Tarsus in Cilicia, but brought up in this city, educated at the feet of Gamaliel according to the strict manner of the law of our fathers, being zealous for God as all of you are this day."[2] But we are told nothing specific about the nature or the extent of the influence which he exercised upon the future apostle of the Gentiles (see also Philippians 3:4-6).

      Shabbath 30b mentions a student of Gamaliel I who displayed "impudence in learning," a person some scholars identify as possibly referring to Paul. Helmut Koester is doubtful that Paul studied under this famous rabbi, arguing that there is a marked contrast in the tolerance that Gamaliel is said to have expressed about Christianity when contrasted with the "murderous rage" against Christians that he thinks Paul displayed prior to his conversion, see also Persecution of early Christians by the Jews.

       

      (...)

      Rabbi Gamaliel I held a reputation of one of the greatest teachers in the annals of Judaism. Mish. Sotah ix.15 pays tribute to this quality: "Since Rabban Gamaliel the Elder died, there has been no more reverence for the law, and purity and abstinence died out at the same time." While believing the law to be wholly inspired by God, he ruled that the sabbath laws should be less rigorous and more realistic. He also argued that the law should protect women during divorce and urged Jews to be kind towards Gentiles.

      Gamaliel is also thought to be the originator of many legal ordinances. He fathered a son, whom he called Simeon, after his father's name, and a daughter, who married the priest Simon ben Nathanael

       


    • dottie zold
      Ooops it should say without her nothing moves, as we are dealing with the fallen Sophia .   d ... From: dottie zold <dottie_z@yahoo.com> Subject:
      Message 49 of 49 , Jun 10, 2008
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        Ooops it should say " without her nothing moves, as we are dealing with the fallen Sophia'.

         

        d

        --- On Tue, 6/10/08, dottie zold <dottie_z@...> wrote:

        From: dottie zold <dottie_z@...>
        Subject: [anthroposophy_tomorrow] The Feet
        To: anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Tuesday, June 10, 2008, 12:14 PM

        Hey Friends,

         

        I have wondered for years why it is that they said the 'feet' represented the sexual organ. Well, it is said the Hebrews say this. And of course we always see, just about always, the Magdalene at the feet of Jesus on the Cross. Always at the feet. And the other Mary usually at the head. When there are three they are positioned head hand feet.

         

        Today I realized when contemplating again on the Kaballah, that we have the feet, which is also mentioned in the bible as 'take your shoes of you are on Holy Ground'. Now I have considered all of this before but it just suddenly hit  home that the 'feet' is the body of the Tree of Life. And we are looking at the Root Chakra, what is often considered the sexual chakra, yet in a higher sense we are dealing with 'creativity'.

         

        So we know the Magdalene represents the Malkuth, the root chakra, and without her nothing has to deal with the fallen Sophia.

         

        But I just thought it interesting to consider why the feet were considered by the Hebrews to respresent the sexual organ! Now we know, it was their mystery teachings.

         

        All good things,

        Dottie

         


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