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Pope to Purge Vatican of Modern Music

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  • tmasthenes13
    Frank, Gman, Dottie, The Anthroposophy-Catholic discussion here needs a proper musical soundtrack to play in the background. What music shall it be? Read what
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 23, 2007
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      Frank, Gman, Dottie,

      The Anthroposophy-Catholic discussion here needs a proper musical
      soundtrack to play in the background. What music shall it be? Read
      what Pope Benny is suggesting.

      Tom

      ================================
      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2007/11/20/wpope120.xml



      Pope to purge the Vatican of modern music

      By Malcolm Moore in Rome
      ------------------------------------------

      The Pope is considering a dramatic overhaul of the Vatican in order to
      force a return to traditional sacred music.

      After reintroducing the Latin Tridentine Mass, the Pope wants to widen
      the use of Gregorian chant and baroque sacred music.

      In an address to the bishops and priests of St Peter's Basilica, he
      said that there needed to be "continuity with tradition" in their
      prayers and music.

      He referred pointedly to "the time of St Gregory the Great", the pope
      who gave his name to Gregorian chant.

      Gregorian chant has been reinstituted as the primary form of singing
      by the new choir director of St Peter's, Father Pierre Paul.
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      He has also broken with the tradition set up by John Paul II of having
      a rotating choir, drawn from churches all over the world, to sing Mass
      in St Peter's.

      The Pope has recently replaced the director of pontifical liturgical
      celebrations, Archbishop Piero Marini, with a man closer to his heart,
      Mgr Guido Marini. It is now thought he may replace the head of the
      Sistine Chapel choir, Giuseppe Liberto.

      The International Church Music Review recently criticised the choir,
      saying: "The singers wanted to overshout each other, they were
      frequently out of tune, the sound uneven, the conducting without any
      artistic power, the organ and organ playing like in a second-rank
      country parish church."

      Mgr Valentin Miserachs Grau, the director of the Pontifical Institute
      of Sacred Music, which trains church musicians, said that there had
      been serious "deviations" in the performance of sacred music.

      "How far we are from the true spirit of sacred music. How can we stand
      it that such a wave of inconsistent, arrogant and ridiculous
      profanities have so easily gained a stamp of approval in our
      celebrations?" he said.

      He added that a pontifical office could correct the abuses, and would
      be "opportune". He said: "Due to general ignorance, especially in
      sectors of the clergy, there exists music which is devoid of sanctity,
      true art and universality."

      Mgr Grau said that Gregorian chant was the "cardinal point" of
      liturgical music and that traditional music "should become again the
      living soul of the assembly".

      The Pope favoured the idea of a watchdog for church music when he was
      the cardinal in charge of safeguarding Catholic doctrine.

      He is known to be a strong supporter of Mgr Grau, who is also in
      charge of the Cappella Liberiana of the Basilica of Santa Maria
      Maggiore in Rome.
    • Frank Thomas Smith
      ... Nah, there s something much much better. In the seventies an Argentinian named Ariel Ramirez wrote the Misa Criolla (native mass) a truly beautiful mass.
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 23, 2007
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        --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "tmasthenes13"
        <TomBuoyed@...> wrote:
        >
        > Frank, Gman, Dottie,
        >
        > The Anthroposophy-Catholic discussion here needs a proper musical
        > soundtrack to play in the background. What music shall it be? Read
        > what Pope Benny is suggesting.
        >
        > Tom
        >
        > ================================

        Nah, there's something much much better. In the seventies an
        Argentinian named Ariel Ramirez wrote the "Misa Criolla" (native mass)
        a truly beautiful mass. Back then during my first tour in Argentina I
        heard they were performing it in the neighborhood church at high mass,
        so I went and experienced a spiritual meltdown. It became very popular
        here, but of course it was eventually forbidden, don't know if by the
        VAtican or just the local curia. I also don't know if it's being used
        again now at masses. But it has has often been performed in concert halls.
        I strongly urge y'all to listen:
        http://www.emusic.com/album/Counterpoint-Misa-Criolla-MP3-Download/10957300.html
        Padre Frank
      • Frank Thomas Smith
        ... halls. ... http://www.emusic.com/album/Counterpoint-Misa-Criolla-MP3-Download/10957300.html ... Actually it was in the sixties, not the seventies, and I
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 23, 2007
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          --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "Frank Thomas Smith"
          <eltrigal78@...> wrote:
          >

          > Nah, there's something much much better. In the seventies an
          > Argentinian named Ariel Ramirez wrote the "Misa Criolla" (native mass)
          > a truly beautiful mass. Back then during my first tour in Argentina I
          > heard they were performing it in the neighborhood church at high mass,
          > so I went and experienced a spiritual meltdown. It became very popular
          > here, but of course it was eventually forbidden, don't know if by the
          > VAtican or just the local curia. I also don't know if it's being used
          > again now at masses. But it has has often been performed in concert
          halls.
          > I strongly urge y'all to listen:
          >
          http://www.emusic.com/album/Counterpoint-Misa-Criolla-MP3-Download/10957300.html
          > Padre Frank

          Actually it was in the sixties, not the seventies, and I don't know if
          it was ever actually banned in churches here. I had that impression,
          but can't find anything in Google to confirm it.
          Frank
        • gaelman58
          ... http://www.emusic.com/album/Counterpoint-Misa-Criolla-MP3-Download/10957300.html ... How about that!...ala Mel Allen...a man more concerned with the truth
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 24, 2007
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            --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "Frank Thomas Smith"
            <eltrigal78@...> wrote:
            >
            > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "Frank Thomas Smith"
            > <eltrigal78@> wrote:
            > >
            >
            > > Nah, there's something much much better. In the seventies an
            > > Argentinian named Ariel Ramirez wrote the "Misa Criolla" (native mass)
            > > a truly beautiful mass. Back then during my first tour in Argentina I
            > > heard they were performing it in the neighborhood church at high mass,
            > > so I went and experienced a spiritual meltdown. It became very popular
            > > here, but of course it was eventually forbidden, don't know if by the
            > > VAtican or just the local curia. I also don't know if it's being used
            > > again now at masses. But it has has often been performed in concert
            > halls.
            > > I strongly urge y'all to listen:
            > >
            >
            http://www.emusic.com/album/Counterpoint-Misa-Criolla-MP3-Download/10957300.html
            > > Padre Frank
            >
            > Actually it was in the sixties, not the seventies, and I don't know if
            > it was ever actually banned in churches here. I had that impression,
            > but can't find anything in Google to confirm it.
            > Frank
            >

            How about that!...ala Mel Allen...a man more concerned with the truth
            of things...as opposed to simply dumping something on the internet
            that might not be true...someone who, in the final analysis, might be
            committed to the orthodoxy that we call, in our more lucid moments,
            truth....G.
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