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Re: [anthroposophy_tomorrow] Question/B

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  • Tarjei Straume
    ... Friedrich Rittelmeyer: Another deep test was in store for me at that time. At the end of 1919 I fell ill. All strenuous mental work was out of the
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 27, 2007
      The Magician wrote:

      Does one doubt that Steiner could have healed the sick if he wanted to for example?

      Friedrich Rittelmeyer:

      Another deep test was in store for me at that time. At the end of 1919 I fell ill. All strenuous mental work was out of the question, and took its revenge in the customary digestive disturbances. What was the trouble? Had my strenuous efforts for occult development led to harmful results after all? What was Dr. Steiner saying? Others wrote to him about me, though I myself did not. There was no reply. I had told numbers of people how reliable his diagnoses were and how unerring was his help. Those around me in Berlin were saying: What about your Dr. Steiner now? Does he not know? Is he not able to do anything? See how he is treating you now!
       
      Not for six months did it turn out that Dr. Steiner had given instructions for a letter to be sent, but that it had been overlooked.
       
      Finally, the ninth doctor, a world-famous nerve specialist, hit upon the right diagnosis: after-effects of a fall, affecting the delicate membranes of the brain. He prescribed a treatment which would bring about a slow improvement. After I had been lying ill for six months, and for a special reason, I approached Dr. Steiner once again, through an acquaintance. This time a detailed letter came from him. Diagnosis: After effects of a fall, affecting the delicate membranes of the brain, added to a life of soul which had passed through much in the last few years. Therapy: The same as that prescribed by the specialist only more rhythmical and more delicately adjusted to the particular organism. Rudolf Steiner had not seen me during this whole period. Even in the unlikely event of his having heard about the specialist’s diagnosis and treatment, his own indications were in any case so much more precise and fundamental that there could be no question of a mere repeating. I have more than once experienced similar cases of correct diagnosis and treatment which were given by Dr. Steiner from far away. But on this subject the doctors working with him can be heard. I once asked one of these doctors who had worked with hini for a period of twelve years, to tell me quite frankly and in confidence, how often Dr. Steiner had been mistaken. He thought a little and then replied: “I do not remember a single case.” - Experiences like this which crowded in upon one in the vicinity of Rudolf Steiner could not but increase one’s faith in his higher faculties.
       
      In his letter, Dr. Steiner wrote that the illness would require at the very least six more months of complete rest . . . It lasted nine months but, as a matter of fact, I wanted to finish the book on his life-work which I had already begun.



      ( -- "Rudolf Steiner Enters My Life",
      Coming Soon to a Computer Near You)


      He chose not to, in order not to be a spectical.

      Friedrich Rittelmeyer:

      Six months later I saw him in quite a different setting. A Berlin agency had undertaken to arrange a big lecturing tour for him. At that time Rudolf Steiner could have been the man of the day - if he had so wished. But things turned out differently. I was present at the gathering in the Berlin Philharmonic Hall - the large auditorium filled to the last seat. Outside people were snatching tickets away from each other and were paying anything up to a hundred marks for them. The hall was full of tense expectation. Unconsciously the people were waiting for the prophet of the age. Rudolf Steiner appeared and spoke for more than an hour to the breathlessly listening mass of three thousand, relentlessly and fundamentally, of Imagination, Inspiration, Intuition. Again and again I asked myself: Has ever a man let an opportunity for impressing a crowd so absolutely slip by? An officer of higher rank, a respected member of the Wagner circle, was sitting by me in the box. I myself had interested him in Dr. Steiner. He sat there attentively and sympathetically, trying hard to understand. Gradually he lost hope and leant back. Then he shook his head irritably and had disappeared long before the end of the lecture.
       
      Did Rudolf Steiner know what he was doing - that he was boring this unusual gathering of people who were waiting, open-mouthed, for sensationalism? Nobody who knew Rudolf Steiner could doubt that he was fully conscious of what he was doing. Embarrassment before the huge crowd? Inability to speak to the masses? None of this could occur for an instant to those who knew how Rudolf Steiner's speaking could make one tremble with its thunder. For whom was he really speaking? During the lecture I reckoned out how many of the audience were able and willing in some measure to follow it. Apart from Anthroposophists, I estimated five to ten. He was speaking to them, quite consciously. Everything that might have made him the sensation of the hour was pitilessly suppressed. Not the faintest breath of a will-to-impress flickered over the assembly. He hoped to awaken interest in spiritual things in those ten or possibly twenty individuals by the essential earnestness and detailed thoroughness with which he spoke of regions utterly foreign to the majority of men.
       
      I had once heard Johannes Muller say that one must not only be able to “talk a hall full” but also to “talk it empty” again. On that particular occasion Rudolf Steiner did this to perfection. Shortly afterwards, when he was again asked to go on a lecturing tour through Germany, the halls were half empty, and the meeting in Munich, where he was threatened with bodily injury and his life endangered as the result of the action of a band of hooligans at the instigation of a newspaper, brought the short period when he was in vogue to a close.
       
      Only a few really saw what was happening. There were few who recognised the greatness of a man and the epoch-making deed. I can only express it with a certain reserve, by using biblical language: One whom the people desired to crown king, left them in supreme contempt and withdrew to a mountain, waiting for whosoever should follow him there. He was the “effect-monger”, the man who “lusted for power”.
       
      Similar situations, only not of this importance, have come to my knowledge many times. It really took some doing for outsiders not to let themselves be deceived by appearances. But then, even clever and apparently open-minded men were outwitted.


      ( -- "Rudolf Steiner Enters My Life",
      Coming Soon to a Computer Near You)



      Tarjei

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