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Re: Steiner Explores the Celtic World

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  • kmlightseeker
    ... This seems to me to be a much more lively recording of the piece: http://www.collectionscanada.ca/obj/m2/f7/19107.mp3 ... music. ... singer.
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 17, 2007
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      --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "kmlightseeker"
      <kmlightseeker@...> wrote:
      >
      > And on the piece of music that the lecture is partially based on:
      >
      > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hebrides_Overture
      >
      >
      > -> Audio clip:
      >
      > http://www.collectionscanada.ca/obj/m2/f7/19108.mp3
      >


      This seems to me to be a much more lively recording of the piece:

      http://www.collectionscanada.ca/obj/m2/f7/19107.mp3


      >
      >
      > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "kmlightseeker"
      > <kmlightseeker@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hi everyone,
      > >
      > >
      > > Something for St Patrick's Day:
      > >
      > > http://wn.rsarchive.org/Lectures/MenHeb_index.html
      > >
      > >
      > > Excerpt:
      > >
      > > ""Mendelssohn's `Overture of the Hebrides'"
      > >
      > > Address by Dr. Rudolf Steiner
      > >
      > > 3 March, 1911
      > >
      > >
      > > (This Address was given following a Concert at the Berlin Group of
      > > the Anthroposophical Society, at which Mendelssohn's "Overture of the
      > > Hebrides" had been played)
      > >
      > >
      > > Through the tones and harmonies of this Overture we have been led in
      > > spirit to the shores of Scotland, and in our souls, we have thus
      > > followed again a path of travel which, during the course of human
      > > evolution, has been deeply influenced by the secrets of karma. For,
      > > from entirely different parts of the western hemisphere of our earth,
      > > as if through a karmic current of migration, various peoples were once
      > > transplanted into that region, and its vicinity, to which these tones
      > > now lead us. And many strange destinies are made known to us. We are
      > > told, both by what Occultism relates as well as by outer historical
      > > documents, of what these peoples experienced in very ancient times on
      > > this particular part of the earth.
      > >
      > > A memory of the mysterious destinies of these peoples arose again, as
      > > if newly awakened, when about 1772 the cave on the Island of Staffa
      > > belonging to the Hebrides, known as Fingal's Cave, was rediscovered.
      > > Those who beheld it were reminded of mysterious ancient destinies when
      > > they saw how Nature herself seemed to have constructed something which
      > > may be likened to a wonderful cathedral. It is constructed with great
      > > symmetry in long aisles of countless pillars towering aloft: above
      > > there arches a ceiling of the same stonework, while below the bases of
      > > the pillars are washed by the inrushing foaming waves of the sea which
      > > ceaselessly beat and resound with a music which is like thunder within
      > > this mighty temple. Dropping water drips steadily from strange stone
      > > formations upon the stalactites beneath, making melodious magical
      music.
      > >
      > > A spectacle of this kind actually exists there. And those who, upon
      > > discovering it, had a sense for the mysterious things which once took
      > > place in this region, must have been reminded of the hero who once
      > > upon a time, as one of the most famous individualities of the West,
      > > guided destiny here in such a strange way, and whose fame was sung by
      > > his son, the blind Ossian, who is like a western Homer — a blind
      singer.
      > >
      > > If we look back and see how deeply people were impressed by what they
      > > heard about this place, we shall be able to understand how it was that
      > > Macpherson's revival of this ancient song in the 18th Century made
      > > such a mighty impression upon Europe. There is nothing which may be
      > > compared with the impression made by this poem. Goethe, Herder,
      > > Napoleon harkened to it — and all believed to discern in its rhythms
      > > and sounds something of the magic of primeval days. Here we must
      > > understand that a spiritual world such as still existed at that time,
      > > arose within their hearts, and felt itself drawn to what sounded forth
      > > out of this song! And what was it that thus sounded forth?
      > >
      > > We must now turn our gaze to those times which fall together with the
      > > first impulses of Christianity and the few centuries which followed.
      > > What happened up there in the vicinity of the Hebrides, in Ireland and
      > > Scotland — in ancient Erin, which included all the neighboring islands
      > > between Ireland and Scotland, as well as the northern part of Scotland
      > > itself. Here we must seek for the kernel of those peoples, of Celtic
      > > origin, who had most of all preserved the ancient Atlantian
      > > clairvoyance in its full purity."
      > >
      > >
      > > Regards,
      > >
      > > Keith
      > >
      >
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