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Re: [anthroposophy_tomorrow] Re: Killing

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  • dottie zold
    I don t agree Frank. I think yes he was a dictator and a murderer and just like Mohamed before him this was the land and the people he was born into. It is
    Message 1 of 140 , Jan 2, 2007
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      I don't agree Frank. I think yes he was a dictator and
      a murderer and just like Mohamed before him this was
      the land and the people he was born into. It is live
      and die by the sword there. If it wasn't Saddam it
      would've been someone else. With Saddam however I find
      that he worked to find a way that all three could live
      together in some relative peace. At least peace as
      best it could be with those types of factions at work.
      Yes he kept his thumb on the various factions but I
      have since seen those various factions and I have to
      say I can't see a way that they can be kept in line
      without a hard core dictator. However Saddam as a
      hardcore dicator worked to have it be a secular
      society wherein they could all live in peace to the
      best of their ability.

      I remember some of the first pictures to come out when
      Saddam had fallen a few years back. They were beating
      themselves with spikes and knives and it was just
      incredible to view. There were comments that their
      religious freedoms were not recognized by Saddam
      because he did not allow them to congregate in those
      types of rituals on the streets. And I thought, 'wow,
      look at that, look at what goes on there if it was
      allowed to be'. And he kept them down. Would it had
      been great if he had found another way to do so? Of
      course it would've been. However I think it very naive
      of us to think that it could've happened without a
      strong hand such as Saddam's'. Again this is not
      saying I think this manner is okay. However it is
      saying that I can recognize that while he was alive
      and in charge that countries people were able to live
      in a manner closer to Western living then others in
      their region.

      I do believe they did have rights. It may not have
      been the rights we have here but it was a well
      educated people that was then decimated by the
      sanctions. I can look at the U.S.'s hand in every
      single war they have had in the last twenty years. And
      it was a boon for the administrations such as this
      current one to have such wars while they stood back
      and others died. Now our own boys are dying. Something
      they had not planned on.

      I think if one looks at the history of Iraq with how
      the people lived and worked in that country, aside
      from the propaganda, one will see a very different
      picture then the one shown on television these last 5
      years. He was a dictator no doubt about it. But I
      don't see him as a killer for killings sake, I see him
      setting up a war on behalf of a secular society where
      one can be devoted to Mohamed and still be able to
      live without trying to die or kill others for him.

      I think it was his task to set up what can be seen as
      a way to move forward as far as the rights and
      education of the regular every day people in the
      mideast. I think he set a very powerful ideal in the
      minds of what can happen if one can have a love for
      God and yet live in the real world without forcing
      others into a Mohamed jihad every two seconds. He
      lived by the sword and he died by it and he left in my
      mind a powerful ideal of how Muslims can live in the
      world if they would put aside which brand of Islam is
      more important than the other.

      I have a muslim friend for Tunisia. He can not under
      any circumstances ask his Imman questions about the
      Koran. They are not allowed: one does not question
      Mohamed's word and those that have interpreted it. It
      is a cause for death. And they all know it. Secular
      ways of thinking for Mohamed's people is a must to
      step out of the killings in his name.

      My thoughts,
      Dottie

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    • Gotthard K. Danae O'C.
      Dottie, The Jesus son of a hure is Jesus ben Pandira, see the cycle about the Matthew Gospel by RS. Regards Gotthard in Melbourne AUS ... -- Selma Lagerlöf
      Message 140 of 140 , Jan 21, 2007
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        Dottie,
        The Jesus son of a hure is Jesus ben Pandira, see the cycle about the Matthew Gospel by RS.
        Regards Gotthard in Melbourne AUS

        On 1/18/07, dottie zold <dottie_z@...> wrote:

        I was just wondering which lineage is the one that has
        the line of those called the Prostitute? Was that the
        Solomon line or the Nathan line?









         

        --
        Selma Lagerlöf (1859-1940), 1909 Nobel Literature Laureate:"[Rudolf Steiner] taught a number of things in which I have long believed, among them that it is no longer possible in our time to offer a religion full of unsubstantiated miracles, but rather that religion must be a science which can be proven. It is no longer a question of belief, but of knowing. Further, we acquire knowledge of the spiritual world through steady, conscious, systematic thinking ... In years to come, his teachings will be proclaimed from the pulpits"

        Rudolf Steiner: Only truth can bring us security in the development of our individual forces.
        Whoever is tortured from doubts, his forces are paralysed.
        In a world, enigmatic to one self, one can find no aim for one's working.
                Motto of 'Philosophy of Spiritual Activity' 1894, Appendix II 1918
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