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Re: New Orleans and the Maid of Orleans

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  • holderlin66
    Innocent tales, widely told through the Lorraine countryside, of fairy trees were accepted without verification and were distorted. A girl leading
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 5, 2006
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      "Innocent tales, widely told through the Lorraine countryside,
      of "fairy trees" were accepted without verification and were
      distorted. A girl leading men-at-arms, dressed completely like a
      man, could not be other than depraved, a monster, a loose creature,
      like-the ribald dames who followed the armies."

      "Then she was questioned about a certain tree growing near her
      village. To which she answered that, fairly near Domrémy, there was
      a certain tree called the Ladies' Tree, and others called it the
      Fairies' Tree; and near by is a fountain. And she has heard that
      people sick of the fever drink of this fountain and seek its water
      to restore their health; that, she has seen herself; but she does
      not know whether they are cured or not. She said she has heard that
      the sick, when they can rise, go to the tree and walk about it. It
      is a big tree, a beech, from which they get the fair May, in French
      le beau may; and it belongs, it is said, to Pierre de Bourlemont,
      knight. She said sometimes she would go playing with the other young
      girls, making garlands for Our Lady of Domrémy there; and often she
      had heard the old folk say (not those of her family) that the
      fairies frequented it. And she heard a certain Jeanne, the wife of
      mayor Aubery of Domrémy, her godmother, say that she had seen the
      fairies;

      "Near the village of Domrémy stands a certain large and ancient
      tree, commonly called ''l'arbre charmine faée de Bourlemont," and
      near the tree is a fountain. It is said that round about live evil
      spirits, called fairies, with whom those who practice spells are
      wont to dance at night, wandering about the tree and the fountain."

      On Saturday the 24th day of February, she answered that not far from
      Domrémy there is a tree called the Ladies' Tree which some call the
      Fairies' Tree, and near it is a fountain. She has heard that the
      sick drink of this fountain (she herself has drunk of it) and seek
      from its waters the restoration of their health; but she does not
      know whether they are cured or not.

      Gabriel, and they appeared to her in bodily form. Sometimes also she
      saw a great host of angels; and since then, St. Catherine and St.
      Margaret have appeared to the said woman who saw them in the flesh.
      And every day she sees them and hears their speech; and, when she
      embraces and kisses them, she touches them and feels them
      physically. She has seen, not only the heads of the said angels and
      the saints, but other parts of their bodies, whereof she has not
      chosen to speak. And the said St. Catherine and St. Margaret spoke
      to her at times by a certain fountain, near a great tree, commonly
      called 'The Fairies' Tree'; in the matter of the fountain and of the
      tree, the common report is that it is the frequent resort of
      witches, that many sick of the fever go to this fountain and tree to
      recover their health, although these are situated in an unhallowed
      spot. There, and elsewhere, on several occasions, she has adored
      them and done them reverence. "
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