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Seven Liberal Arts/Deadly Sins

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  • val2160
    The Planet Saturn and Astronomica By William Bento The planet Saturn is associated with the Liberal Art of Astronimica, the art of expressing theological and
    Message 1 of 43 , May 20, 2006
      The Planet Saturn and Astronomica

      By William Bento

      The planet Saturn is associated with the Liberal Art of Astronimica, the art of
      expressing theological and cosmological views. Overcoming abstractions
      often connected to the study of the starry sky is quite a pressing need in our
      time. The revival of the archetypal-mythological imagery in our culture is but a
      step to re-enlivening our relationship to the heavens.

      Astronomica speaks: "Moreover, matters which over the vast span of ages
      have been reposited in the sanctums of Egyptian priest, I was keeping secret,
      not wishing to divulge and profane them. In fact, for almost forty thousand
      years I kept myself in seclusion there, in reverent observation...after a long
      lapse of time, no worldly allurements, no vain glorius speculations of
      philosophers had known that I was in Greece destined not to be kept hidden
      by a philosopher's cloak, but to be divulged to all."

      Cosmopolitan attitudes of a global nature are undergoing transformations
      toward the awareness of cosmic citizenship. Spiritual world views of the
      ancients are arising in many different fields of endeavor. From physics to
      psychology the image of the universe and the human being are being re-
      examined. The great obstacle to their Renaissance of cosmology lies in the
      Deadly Sin associated with the planet Saturn; Sloth, Laziness, or Apathy. This
      tendency is accentuated by our growing reliance on experts in the field.
      Activating our own will to pursue the mysteries of Life is the free deed that
      must precede understanding the cosmic dimension of our existence.
    • Jo Ann Schwartz
      ... Hi Val, Although I am not a Quaker, I did attend a Quaker college and frequently attended Quaker services. Quaker services (aka, meetings) come in two
      Message 43 of 43 , Jun 2, 2006
        --- Val wrote:

        > And it seems to me someone brought up the Quakers in this process.
        > Someone is always bringing up the Quakers. But don't the Quakers have
        > a regular meeting where they just sit in silence? Like once a week
        > for an hour they just sit there together? I think they have something
        > like this that underlies and supports their consensus process and it
        > is rarely, if ever mentioned.

        Hi Val,

        Although I am not a Quaker, I did attend a Quaker college and frequently attended
        Quaker services. Quaker services (aka, meetings) come in two flavors --
        unprogrammed and programmed. The unprogrammed variety is also known as "silent
        meeting." By preference I attended silent meeting. In general, in a silent meeting
        a short text is read and then the group meditates upon it. But attendees *are*
        allowed to speak, if the Spirit moves them. Since many folks are reluctant to
        speak, Spirit often literally 'moves' them - inducing trembling or quaking until
        they do. [Programmed meetings, on the other hand, are pretty much what you might
        expect from a church service: prayer, readings from the Bible, readings from the
        Book of Discipline, a sermon, hymn singing, music, and "free worship based upon
        silent waiting." Well, ok, you might not expect the last -- but it is, after all,
        still a Quaker meeting! <G>]

        Here I'd like to quote from something I found on the web, because it both matches my
        experience of the Quaker consensus process and says it better than I could:
        ( http://www.religioustolerance.org/quaker2.htm )

        "Quakers do not simply seek a consensus, as many people believe. They seek the
        will of God by following the leading of the Spirit to resolve differences. One of
        their documents states: "In all our meetings for church affairs we need to listen
        together to the Holy Spirit. We do not seek consensus; we are seeking the will of
        God. The unity of the meeting lies more in the unity of the search than in the
        decision which is reached. We must not be distressed if our listening involves
        waiting, perhaps in confusion, until we feel clear what it is God wants done."**
        [** from The "Quaker Faith & Practice" of the Britain Yearly Meeting - Paragraph
        2.89]

        Musing on the Mystery of the Spirit...
        JoAnn
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