Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Steiner on Steiner - Part 2

Expand Messages
  • Steve Hale
    Notes By Rudolf Steiner written for Edouard Schure in Barr, Alsace, September 1907 Officially I studied mathematics, chemistry, physics, zoology, botany,
    Message 1 of 1 , May 1, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Notes By Rudolf Steiner written for Edouard Schure in Barr, Alsace,
      September 1907

      Officially I studied mathematics, chemistry, physics, zoology,
      botany, mineralogy, and geology. These subjects offered a much
      firmer foundation for a spiritual conception of the world than, for
      example, history or literature, subjects which German academic life
      at that time provided neither with a specific methodology nor with
      significant perspectives.

      In my first years at college in Vienna I became acquainted with Karl
      Julius Schroer. Initially I attended his lectures on the history of
      German literature since Goethe's time, as well as his lectures on
      Goethe and Schiller, the history of German literature in the 19th
      century and Goethe's `Faust'. I also took part in his `Practicals
      in the Spoken and the Written Word'. This was a proper college
      course, following the pattern of Uhland's course at the college in
      Tubingen. Schroer's background was German language studies and he
      had undertaken important research into German dialects in Austria;
      he was a researcher in the spirit of the Grimm brothers and in the
      field of literary studies he was an admirer of Gervinus. Previously
      he had been the director of the Viennese evangelical schools. He is
      the son of the writer and outstanding educationalist Christian
      Oeser. While I knew him he was devoting himself entirely to
      Goethe. He has written a widely-read commentary on Goethe's `Faust'
      and also on Goethe's other dramas. He studied at the German
      universities of Leipzig, Halle and Berlin while German Idealism was
      still a strong force. He was the living embodiment of German
      education at its best. It was his human qualities which made him
      attractive. I soon became friendly with him and thereafter spent
      much time at his house. He was like an oasis of Idealism in the
      dry, materialistic desert of German education. External events in
      this period centered on the nationality struggles in Austria.
      Schroer himself had no connection with the natural sciences.

      But from early 1880 onward I started to work on Goethe's scientific
      studies.
      Then Joseph Kurschner founded the comprehensive `Deutsche
      National-Literatur' Edition, for which Schroer acted as editor of
      Goethe's dramas, also providing an introduction and commentary. On
      Schroer's recommendation, Kurschner commissioned me to edit Goethe's
      scientific writings. Schroer wrote a preface to them, in which he
      introduced me to the literary public.
      In this compendium I wrote introductions to Goethe's botany,
      zoology, geology and theory of colour. Theosophical ideas can
      already be found in these introductions, clothed in philosophical
      Idealism. They also deal with Haeckel.
      My Theory of Knowledge of 1886 is like a philosophical
      continuation of these introductions.
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.