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Re: Thoreau online

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  • write3chairs
    Hi Steve! I look forward to your response to this when you have time. I totally agree with you about Thoreau. Also, I have found the connection between Thoreau
    Message 1 of 22 , May 1, 2006
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      Hi Steve!

      I look forward to your response to this when you have time. I totally
      agree with you about Thoreau. Also, I have found the connection
      between Thoreau and Steiner rather amazing at times. They even look
      eerily alike. In fact, I have a photo of Steiner and Thoreau, side by
      side, that I just tried to post to the group but received a message
      saying I don't have photo-sharing privileges. (Of all the nerve!)

      Cheers,
      Jennifer

      --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Hale" wrote:

      > > Is that true, that he died of a broken heart?
      > >
      > > Cheers,
      > > Jennifer
      >
      > What a beautifully phrased question. And one that I would like to
      > go into when more time affords me the opportunity. Thoreau is a
      > very important figure at the height of materialism in the 19th
      > century. He died the year after Rudolf Steiner was born, when the
      > War Between the States was in its second year.
      >
      > Steve
    • Steve Hale
      ... Yes, Thoreau. The man who said: simplify, simplify. Yet, the two years on Walden Pond only served to complicate his life. He became an activist in spite
      Message 2 of 22 , May 2, 2006
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        --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "write3chairs"
        <write3chairs@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi Steve!
        >
        > I look forward to your response to this when you have time. I totally
        > agree with you about Thoreau. Also, I have found the connection
        > between Thoreau and Steiner rather amazing at times. They even look
        > eerily alike. In fact, I have a photo of Steiner and Thoreau, side by
        > side, that I just tried to post to the group but received a message
        > saying I don't have photo-sharing privileges. (Of all the nerve!)

        Yes, Thoreau. The man who said: simplify, simplify. Yet, the two
        years on Walden Pond only served to complicate his life. He became an
        activist in spite of his better nature, and this started to undermine
        his health. He supported the abolition of slavery and wrote against
        it. Then, John Brown was hanged after the raid of Harper's Ferry, and
        the brutal Civil War began. It was inevitable, and would cost the life
        of the President of the United States that had given the Emancipation
        Proclamation in September of 1863.

        But it allowed the United States to become the foremost world power
        just 33 years after its conclusion, when armed with the big eight
        industries, it fought the so-called "Spanish-Americsn War" in 1898;
        just 100 years before Soradt's third incarnation in 1998.

        Thoreau was a transcendentalist in America in the same spirit as
        Fechner was a panpsychist in Europe, seeking the simple life built
        around the renewal of Aristotle's secret teachings of the three
        kingdoms of nature. This occurred in the 19th century because of the
        inevitable rise of theoretical materialism and its subsequent
        progression into the practical materialism of the 20th century. It was
        designed to be a signpost, and Walden Pond was the signifier of it.

        Steve
      • Steve Hale
        ... Basically, the reason that Thoreau died of a broken heart is because the one love that he had in his life was lost to him; just as Novalis lost his true
        Message 3 of 22 , May 3, 2006
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          --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "write3chairs"
          <write3chairs@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Steve!
          >
          > I look forward to your response to this when you have time. I totally
          > agree with you about Thoreau. Also, I have found the connection
          > between Thoreau and Steiner rather amazing at times. They even look
          > eerily alike. In fact, I have a photo of Steiner and Thoreau, side by
          > side, that I just tried to post to the group but received a message
          > saying I don't have photo-sharing privileges. (Of all the nerve!)
          >
          > Cheers,
          > Jennifer

          Basically, the reason that Thoreau died of a broken heart is because
          the one love that he had in his life was lost to him; just as Novalis
          lost his true love. And they both died of tuberculosis.

          Thus, when true love is lost, a cause (idea) becomes paramount in
          replacement of a love that would have solved all problems. In the case
          of Thoreau, it was an adherence to the simplicity and naive
          spirituality inherent in nature and its daily recognition. Then it was
          replaced with the very real strivings of one who sought liberation for
          the black man who had been brought to this country against his will to
          do the labor of the white man. This became a cause even above nature,
          and its inherent simple spiritual way.

          Then John Brown was hanged in an act of utter disrespect for the human
          race as a whole, and Thoreau experienced it as a psychic shock of
          profound proportions. And the resulting Civil War was too much for his
          sensitive soul constitution to handle. He died realizing the loss of a
          nation that he had held as an ideal.

          Steve
        • write3chairs
          ... because ... Novalis ... case ... was ... for ... will to ... nature, ... human ... for his ... of a ... Hi, Steve! Thanks so much for this. I have much to
          Message 4 of 22 , May 3, 2006
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            --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Hale" wrote:

            > Basically, the reason that Thoreau died of a broken heart is
            because
            > the one love that he had in his life was lost to him; just as
            Novalis
            > lost his true love. And they both died of tuberculosis.
            >
            > Thus, when true love is lost, a cause (idea) becomes paramount in
            > replacement of a love that would have solved all problems. In the
            case
            > of Thoreau, it was an adherence to the simplicity and naive
            > spirituality inherent in nature and its daily recognition. Then it
            was
            > replaced with the very real strivings of one who sought liberation
            for
            > the black man who had been brought to this country against his
            will to
            > do the labor of the white man. This became a cause even above
            nature,
            > and its inherent simple spiritual way.
            >
            > Then John Brown was hanged in an act of utter disrespect for the
            human
            > race as a whole, and Thoreau experienced it as a psychic shock of
            > profound proportions. And the resulting Civil War was too much
            for his
            > sensitive soul constitution to handle. He died realizing the loss
            of a
            > nation that he had held as an ideal.
            >
            > Steve

            Hi, Steve! Thanks so much for this. I have much to learn about
            Thoreau and his life. What you share here is utterly sad. Thank you
            again.

            In peace,
            Jennifer

            "There is no remedy for love but to love more."
            (Thoreau, Journal 1, 81)
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