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Balls and scores

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  • gaelman58
    IMO, increasingly modern culture is sports saturated...I know some fellows who talk about little else...and soccer moms in SUV s...and media furor over this or
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 1, 2006
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      IMO, increasingly modern culture is sports saturated...I know some
      fellows who talk about little else...and soccer moms in SUV's...and
      media furor over this or that championship...and it's not just the
      USA...it's apparently a big time human concern...at least for those
      with some leisure time but maybe not for those in northeast Africa.

      How do Waldorf schools deal with organized competitive
      athletics?...are they encouraged?...discouraged?...ignored?

      From a practical standpoint with respect to a school's viability,
      organized sports would have to be taken into account. How does that
      work out?....G
    • deborah byron
      Just an aside and not an opinion about kid s school-based sports which is a different matter entirely--not long ago as a friend listened to me express
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 1, 2006
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        Just an aside and not an opinion about kid's school-based sports which is
        a different matter entirely--not long ago as a friend listened to me
        express amazement at the amounts of money, attention and energy wasted on
        big-time professional sports, while much of the human race seems to circle
        the drain, he remarked simply, "its a substitute for war." Wonder if
        that's what the Greeks intended...

        DB
      • Frank Smith
        ... Baseball s spiritual-scientific activities haven´t reached farther south than Venezuela and Colombia, the rest of the continent being dominated by Lucie
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 1, 2006
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          --- gaelman58 <gaelman58@...> wrote:

          > IMO, increasingly modern culture is sports
          > saturated...I know some
          > fellows who talk about little else...and soccer moms
          > in SUV's...and
          > media furor over this or that championship...and
          > it's not just the
          > USA...it's apparently a big time human concern...at
          > least for those
          > with some leisure time but maybe not for those in
          > northeast Africa.
          >
          > How do Waldorf schools deal with organized
          > competitive
          > athletics?...are they
          > encouraged?...discouraged?...ignored?
          >
          > From a practical standpoint with respect to a
          > school's viability,
          > organized sports would have to be taken into
          > account. How does that
          > work out?....G
          >
          Baseball's spiritual-scientific activities haven´t
          reached farther south than Venezuela and Colombia, the
          rest of the continent being dominated by Lucie and
          Arie kicking head-shaped balls around. In order take a
          small step forward to counteract this influence, I
          introduced baseball in the little Waldorf school El
          Trigal here. That was 5 or 6 years ago, when my son
          was was still in the school and I was English teacher.
          So they learned American English in group dynamics:
          first base, second base, third base, home, foul ball,
          out! (most popular word), safe, etc. When they get
          excited, which is almost always, they revert to
          Spanish, even calling home "cuarta". We had a pretty
          good team (actually softball, cause we didn't have
          enough gloves for basball, not to mention catchers
          equipment), even practicing at home. Trouble was, we
          didn't have anyone to play against. I quit teaching
          this year, but still go down occasionally with my
          aluminum bat and we play, 5th and 6th grades - that's
          as far as the school goes. The kids' enthusiasm for a
          game they've never seen played and know no heroes is
          amazing. Even the girls like it, though with a few
          exceptions they...well...they throw like girls, if ya
          know what I mean, and chop at the ball like they're
          tryin to hammer it into the ground, and catch with
          their heads. When other teachers watch, they go away
          shaking their heads, muttering that they don't
          understand a thing. The phys ed teacher learned it in
          college but, well, she throws like a girl. Just the
          facts, ma'am, no sexism.
          Frank


          Frank Thomas Smith
          http://SouthernCrossReview.org

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        • gaelman58
          ... which is ... wasted on ... circle ... Deborah: That is an interesting aside and something I ve given thought to...I try as best I can (sometimes :) ) to
          Message 4 of 7 , Apr 3, 2006
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            --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "deborah byron"
            <laquerencia33@...> wrote:
            >
            > Just an aside and not an opinion about kid's school-based sports
            which is
            > a different matter entirely--not long ago as a friend listened to me
            > express amazement at the amounts of money, attention and energy
            wasted on
            > big-time professional sports, while much of the human race seems to
            circle
            > the drain, he remarked simply, "its a substitute for war." Wonder if
            > that's what the Greeks intended...
            >
            > DB
            >


            Deborah: That is an interesting aside and something I've given
            thought to...I try as best I can (sometimes :) ) to look at social
            phemonena objectively...just as phenomena without the distortions of
            my sympathies or antipathies. I'd really like to know if competitive
            athletics are an important part of Waldorf eduation...I asked about
            it. Thanks to Frank I know that they play ball down in his school in
            Argentina...do you know of other instances?... Val, Sister Jo, Pete,
            anyone?

            I've often watched newsreel of young men and little boys "rioting"
            over this or that cause...they look like they're having a good time as
            far as I can make out...I've wondered what effect the sudden infusion
            of a rain of soccer balls would have on most of them.

            Or something that at first might seem preposterous...but maybe not.
            In the build-up towards the Falklands War suppose some bold statesman
            from one side or the other boldly insulted the manhood of the
            adversary and challenged them to a winner-take-all (the Malvinas
            Islands) soccer game. The jock-straps of the world would have seen
            the initiation of war as a punk-out....Gaelman
          • pete_karaiskos
            At my kid s school, they play basketball, voleyball and baseball competitively (against other schools). Pete ... if
            Message 5 of 7 , Apr 3, 2006
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              At my kid's school, they play basketball, voleyball and baseball
              competitively (against other schools).

              Pete

              --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "gaelman58"
              <gaelman58@...> wrote:
              >
              > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "deborah byron"
              > <laquerencia33@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Just an aside and not an opinion about kid's school-based sports
              > which is
              > > a different matter entirely--not long ago as a friend listened to me
              > > express amazement at the amounts of money, attention and energy
              > wasted on
              > > big-time professional sports, while much of the human race seems to
              > circle
              > > the drain, he remarked simply, "its a substitute for war." Wonder
              if
              > > that's what the Greeks intended...
              > >
              > > DB
              > >
              >
              >
              > Deborah: That is an interesting aside and something I've given
              > thought to...I try as best I can (sometimes :) ) to look at social
              > phemonena objectively...just as phenomena without the distortions of
              > my sympathies or antipathies. I'd really like to know if competitive
              > athletics are an important part of Waldorf eduation...I asked about
              > it. Thanks to Frank I know that they play ball down in his school in
              > Argentina...do you know of other instances?... Val, Sister Jo, Pete,
              > anyone?
              >
              > I've often watched newsreel of young men and little boys "rioting"
              > over this or that cause...they look like they're having a good time as
              > far as I can make out...I've wondered what effect the sudden infusion
              > of a rain of soccer balls would have on most of them.
              >
              > Or something that at first might seem preposterous...but maybe not.
              > In the build-up towards the Falklands War suppose some bold statesman
              > from one side or the other boldly insulted the manhood of the
              > adversary and challenged them to a winner-take-all (the Malvinas
              > Islands) soccer game. The jock-straps of the world would have seen
              > the initiation of war as a punk-out....Gaelman
              >
            • Jo Ann Schwartz
              Hi Gaelman, re: competitive sports at Waldorf Depends on the age, at least at our school. (Our PE teacher is waldorf trained.) Early grades are all
              Message 6 of 7 , Apr 3, 2006
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                Hi Gaelman,

                re: competitive sports at Waldorf

                Depends on the age, at least at our school. (Our PE teacher is waldorf trained.)
                Early grades are all cooperative games, tumbling, that sort of thing. End of third
                grade, they start with some more competitive games -- capture the flag & the like.
                Goal appears to be to let the kids blow off steam as much as anything. Fifth grade
                has a lot of track & field events, because of the Olympics in the spring. Also in
                5th grade they start learning basketball and softball and it's seventh grade before
                touch football enters the mix. (Of course, many of the kids already know these
                sports from activities outside of school.) Upper grades are also learning a *lot*
                of tumbling, including doubles and group moves. Also, juggling -- some of the kids
                are really quite amazing in what they can do!

                The school does have (separate) boys and girls sports teams in basketball and
                softball. (We pair up with a nearby Friends school and field joint teams.) Sixth
                grade is 'JV' (junior varsity) and 7th & 8th grades combine for varsity. We're part
                of a local private school league (ThinkDetroit) and also participate in various
                tournaments in the metro area.

                My eldest is not sports-minded, but gamely played on both the basketball and
                baseball teams with her classmates. She was not sad that her high school did not
                have any sports teams. She does enjoy gymnastics and tumbling and has done both
                outside of waldorf. (Our family joke is that gymnastics were all that saved her in
                P.E.)

                My youngest enjoys sports a lot; but her sport of choice is soccer. So she doesn't
                play on either of the school teams, she just cheers them on! One of her criteria
                for choosing a high school is that it must have a soccer team. (Another family joke
                is that the PE teacher can't believe the two girls are related. <G>)

                They don't play soccer in gym class, btw, but a few kids do work on their moves at
                recess. Actually, my daugher is the only girl who regularly practices with the boys
                at recess and she feels it gives her a big edge when she plays on the neighborhood
                team.

                It took me a bit to reply because I wanted to vet the info with my kids before
                setting it down.

                Musing on the body in motion,
                JoAnn
              • winters_diana
                ... Gaelman, you may really be onto something here! This is the best idea I have heard in a long time. It sounds so ridiculous but you know it just might work.
                Message 7 of 7 , Apr 3, 2006
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                  >I've often watched newsreel of young men and little boys "rioting"
                  >over this or that cause...they look like they're having a good time
                  >as far as I can make out...I've wondered what effect the sudden
                  >infusion of a rain of soccer balls would have on most of them.


                  Gaelman, you may really be onto something here! This is the best idea I
                  have heard in a long time.

                  It sounds so ridiculous but you know it just might work.


                  The point that they often do appear to be having a good time is
                  important, IMO. Honestly I think the rain of soccer balls would be a
                  stroke of genius.
                  Diana
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