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Re: [anthroposophy_tomorrow] Re: 3 Marias

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  • dottie zold
    ... He s a parable Stephen. :) ... Look at it ending in chapter 7 and consider what was wanting to be said that was lost. Where could chapter 7 have been
    Message 1 of 54 , Sep 4, 2005
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      Stephen:
      > Also interesting, is that Lazarus is depicted in
      > Luke with no
      > reference to sisters. In fact, much of the deeply
      > esoteric nature
      > of the raising of Lazarus is to be found in chapter
      > 16, at the end,
      > where he rests in Abraham's Bosom waiting for the
      > fourth day.

      He's a parable Stephen. :)

      Stephen:
      > Look at Luke, chapters seven and eight, for its
      > depiction of this
      > event of the sinning woman, and her forgiveness of
      > sins.

      Look at it ending in chapter 7 and consider what was
      wanting to be said that was lost. Where could chapter
      7 have been headed (no pun intended) ...ooops my
      wonderful father is in the house, gotta run, d


      > > and then we have the fact that in every mention of
      > the women the
      > > Magdalene is prominant except for in John where it
      > becomes Mother
      > Mary.
      > > As well it is said that the women gave him of
      > their substance. It
      > was
      > > always assumed that this meant something of a
      > monetary or
      > sustanance of
      > > food. I am thinking we are speaking of something
      > very different.
      >
      > In John, it is the Mother, who never is referred to
      > as Mary. Her
      > sister's name was Mary.
      > >
      > > These thoughts are points made in Susan Haskins
      > book 'The
      > Magdalen:
      > > Myth and Metaphor. Except for the 11:1 that is my
      > understanding of
      > the
      > > Three in One from ancient Egpytian times.
      >
      > > Best,
      > > Dottie
      >
      > I think you have struck on something very profound,
      > if we put
      > Lazarus properly in the ratio.
      >
      > Steve
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >





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    • Steve Hale
      Have you ever studied the Samkhya philosophy of India? It s the oldest extant system of intellectual development in the Indian spiritual tradition. It forms
      Message 54 of 54 , Sep 5, 2005
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        Have you ever studied the Samkhya philosophy of India? It's the
        oldest extant system of intellectual development in the Indian
        spiritual tradition. It forms the ground of my development, pre-
        Steiner, and resolves any discord between male-female equanimity and
        dual importance.

        And gives the rationale for the Law of Three in One. As such Purusha-
        Prakriti represent the One (male-female) creative-generative
        principle, while the three gunas (rajas, sattva, tamas) represent the
        three force principles active in any manifestation.

        So, until I met you, this feminine-masculine dichotomy was never an
        issue due to this grounding in Samkhya. Suffice to say that all
        paths lead to the ahamkara as the inner organ of thought with ties to
        the linga sharira. And when we press the ahamkara in its inward
        dimension, we also press the linga sharira for the greater sense of
        our past lives as a matter of recollection. And this yields the
        anandamayakosha, first sought for by Gilgamish when he went searching
        up in the Burgenland.

        Now, what's way up with Lazarus is that he was resurrected in his
        physical body, which Gilgamish couldn't do for his buddy, Eabani;
        although Eabani lived within as well. Lazarus' resurrection gave the
        vehicle for John to do likewise.

        Steve

        --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, dottie zold
        <dottie_z@y...> wrote:
        > Dottie:
        > > > > These thoughts are points made in Susan Haskins
        > > > book 'The
        > > > Magdalen:
        > > > > Myth and Metaphor. Except for the 11:1 that is
        > > my
        > > > understanding of
        > > > the
        > > > > Three in One from ancient Egpytian times.
        >
        > Stephen:
        > > > I think you have struck on something very
        > > profound,
        > > > if we put
        > > > Lazarus properly in the ratio.
        >
        > I am all for whoever gets a ratio gets one. However, I
        > would like to say I have never heard of a Three in
        > One that includes the male. Not to say that it is not
        > possible but it is not what I have ever heard of. And
        > to me the Three in One is explicit to the Marys. I get
        > we have a Lazarus in there but something is way up
        > with that and I have said it over and over and over. I
        > dont think it is a falsehood rather a mystery further
        > than John the Baptist and he.
        >
        > Best,
        > Dottie
        >
        > p.s. And I want to say that I find Bacon in the mix
        > with Aristotle, Alexander, and Plato. Almost like we
        > have the Shakespeare, Bacon and King James. I don't
        > know, something is in there.
        >
        >
        >
        >
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