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Re: Armageddon and the Avignon Presidency

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  • holderlin66
    They show acts that can only be described as blatantly sadistic, cruel and inhumane, Torguemada and Abu Ghraib open up a vast window of the type of
    Message 1 of 22 , Jul 24, 2005
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      "They show acts "that can only be described as blatantly sadistic,
      cruel and inhumane,"

      Torguemada and Abu Ghraib open up a vast window of the type of
      psychological model, or you might say, etheric and historical
      profiles that are used, as both individual symptomology character
      studies and historical patterns that arise as we look back in
      history to the basis of Philip the Fair and the torture of the
      Templars. Not to be taken lightly is how the United States has been
      striding towards overthrowing human treatment and human Geneva
      Conventions and standards to make way for these older, past models
      of behavior that allow older personality and etheric models to arise
      again as cultural profiles.

      http://www.editorandpublisher.com/eandp/news/article_display.jsp?
      vnu_content_id=1000990590

      "So what is shown on the 87 photographs and four videos from Abu
      Ghraib prison that the Pentagon, in an eleventh hour move, blocked
      from release this weekend? One clue: Defense Secretary Donald
      Rumsfeld told Congress last year, after viewing a large cache of
      unreleased images: "I mean, I looked at them last night, and they're
      hard to believe." They show acts "that can only be described as
      blatantly sadistic, cruel and inhumane," he added.

      A Republican Senator suggested the same day they contained scenes
      of "rape and murder." No wonder Rumsfeld commented then, "If these
      are released to the public, obviously it's going to make matters
      worse."

      Yesterday, news emerged that lawyers for the Pentagon had refused to
      cooperate with a federal judge's order to release dozens of unseen
      photographs and videos from Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq by Saturday.
      The photos were among thousands turned over by the
      key "whistleblower" in the scandal, Specialist Joseph M. Darby. Just
      a few that were released to the press sparked the Abu Ghraib abuse
      scandal last year, and the video images are said to be even more
      shocking.

      The Pentagon lawyers said in a letter sent to the federal court in
      Manhattan that they would file a sealed brief explaining their
      reasons for not turning over the material. They had been ordered to
      do so by a federal judge in response to a FOIA lawsuit filed by the
      American Civil Liberties Union. The ACLU accused the government
      Friday of putting another legal roadblock in the way of its bid to
      allow the public to see the images of the prisoner abuse scandal.

      One Pentagon lawyer has argued that they should not be released
      because they would only add to the humiliation of the prisoners. But
      the ACLU has said the faces of the victims can easily be "redacted."

      To get a sense of what may be shown in these images, one has to go
      back to press reports from when the Abu Ghraib abuse scandal was
      still front page news.

      This is how CNN reported it on May 8, 2004, in a typical account
      that day:

      "U.S. Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld revealed Friday that videos
      and `a lot more pictures' exist of the abuse of Iraqis held at Abu
      Ghraib prison.

      "'If these are released to the public, obviously it's going to make
      matters worse,' Rumsfeld told the Senate Armed Services
      Committee. `I mean, I looked at them last night, and they're hard to
      believe.'

      "The embattled defense secretary fielded sharp and skeptical
      questions from lawmakers as he testified about the growing prisoner
      abuse scandal. A military report about that abuse describes
      detainees being threatened, sodomized with a chemical light and
      forced into sexually humiliating poses.

      "Rumsfeld told Congress the unrevealed photos and videos contain
      acts 'that can only be described as blatantly sadistic, cruel and
      inhuman.'"

      The military later screened some of the images for lawmakers, who
      said they showed, among other things, attack dogs snarling at cowed
      prisoners, Iraqi women forced to expose their breasts, and naked
      prisoners forced to have sex with each other.

      In the same period, reporter Seymour Hersh, who helped uncover the
      scandal, said in a speech before an ACLU convention: "Some of the
      worse that happened that you don't know about, ok? Videos, there are
      women there. Some of you may have read they were passing letters,
      communications out to their menÂ….The women were passing messages
      saying `Please come and kill me, because of what's happened.'

      "Basically what happened is that those women who were arrested with
      young boys/children in cases that have been recorded. The boys were
      sodomized with the cameras rolling. The worst about all of them is
      the soundtrack of the boys shrieking that your government has. They
      are in total terror it's going to come out."

      OTHER STIRRING NEWS:

      "President George W. Bush has granted himself the power to declare
      anyone on earth -- including any U.S. citizen -- an "enemy
      combatant," for any reason he sees fit. He can render them up for
      torture, he can imprison them for life, he can even have them
      killed, all without charges, with no burden of proof, no standards
      of evidence, no legislative oversight, no appeal, no judicial
      process whatsoever except those that he himself deigns to construct,
      with whatever limitations he cares to impose. Nor can he ever be
      prosecuted for any order he issues, however criminal; in the new
      American system laid out by Bush's legal minions, the Commander is
      sacrosanct, beyond the reach of any law or constitution."
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