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Let's be sensible on defining education and how it is transmitted.

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  • kmlightseeker
    I think we have to realise the fluidity of approaches and pathways and participation in the education area: (i) Main Entry: ed·u·ca·tor Pronunciation:
    Message 1 of 11 , Jun 3, 2005
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      I think we have to realise the fluidity of approaches and pathways and
      participation in the education area:


      (i)

      "Main Entry: ed·u·ca·tor
      Pronunciation: 'e-j&-"kA-t&r
      Function: noun
      1 : one skilled in teaching : TEACHER
      2 a : a student of the theory and practice of education : EDUCATIONIST
      2 b : an administrator in education"

      (source: Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary
      < http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=educator >)


      (ii)

      "In education, teachers are those who teach students or pupils, often
      a course of study or a practical skill, including learning and
      thinking skills. There are many different ways to teach and help
      students learn. This is often refered to as the teacher's pedagogy.
      When deciding what teaching method to use, a teacher will need to
      consider students' background knowledge, environment, and their
      learning goals."

      (source: "Teacher" < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Educationalist >
      [accessed 4th June 2005])


      (iii)

      "Challenges in education

      The goal of education is the transference of ideas from one person to
      another, or from one person to a group. Can a group of people educate?
      Problems with the current public education sytem include: the method
      of knowledge delivery, how to determine what knowledge should be
      taught, the use and relevancy of the imparted knowledge, and how well
      the pupil will retain incoming knowledge.

      In addition to the ability to the "Three R's", reading, writing, and
      'rithmetic, Western primary and secondary schools attempt to teach the
      basic principles of history, mathematics, including calculus and
      algebra, physics, chemistry, and sometimes politics, in the hope that
      students will retain and use this knowledge as they age. The current
      education system measures competency with tests and assignments and
      then assigns each student a corresponding grade. The grades usually
      come in the form of either a letter grade or a percentage, which
      ideally represents the amount of all material presented in class that
      the student understood. These grades do not reveal the strengths and
      weaknesses of a student. Many feel this grading scheme risks lowering
      students self-esteem and self-confidence, as students may receive poor
      marks for reasons unrelated to their level of intellegence or
      capability, for example poverty, abuse, lack of interest in the
      material, prejudiced or incompetent teachers, uncomfortable
      classrooms, etc.

      Albert Einstein, one of the most famous physicist of our time,
      credited with helping us understand the universe better, was not a
      model school student. He was uninterested in what was being taught,
      and he did not attend classes all the time. However, his gifts
      eventually shone through and added to the sum of human knowledge.

      Every child has certain gifts and abilities, but early and later
      childhood education rarely tries to find out what that may be and help
      the students develop that. If children are good at something they will
      excel in that subject, and if they do not, they may not do as well.

      This brings us to a major critique of modern western education. It
      exposes children to a wide variety of disciplines which is good, but
      subjects are taught, tested, and then the children are generally not
      required to remember the content from before. Time is always spent in
      mathematics classes reteaching students the basic concepts they should
      know from the year before, because students have forgotten most of it.

      There are also some dilemas about the teaching of knowledge. Should
      some knowledge be forgotten? What should be taught, are we better off
      knowing how to build nuclear bombs, or is it best to let such
      knowledge be forgotten?"

      (source: "Education" <
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Educator#Recent_world-wide_educational_trends
      > [accessed 4th June 2005])


      - Here are some educators (go down to "Editorial", and click on the
      coloured names to see the individual's bios), and their qualifications
      and experiences all differ: some are theorists, others have a more
      direct experience - in the main, they are academics or lecturers:

      source: http://www.infed.org/about_us.htm


      - "When attempting to assist a weak, struggling or ineffective
      teacher, one often notes that the teacher has no established
      philosophy of education; no roots, no belief system, no standard upon
      which she is able to base her policies and practices in the classroom.
      She embraces every new technique as her own and tends to define
      progress as adopting what is new because it is new; abandoning what is
      old because it is old. Conversely, the talented and effective educator
      seems to base her every action upon the firm foundation of an
      established philosophy or belief system. Her strength flows from that
      philosophy and she accepts or rejects materials or practices based
      upon their compatibility with her established philosophical concepts.
      This belief system has developed over time and has been adapted,
      modified and molded by the colleagues and clients that she has
      interacted with throughout her career.

      Little is done in our teacher training institutions to encourage the
      young professional to develop or examine her own educational
      philosophy. Administrators sometimes ask for the applicant's
      educational philosophy in an initial job interview, but the
      prospective teacher is seldom required to defend these beliefs with
      theoretical or pragmatic evidence."

      (source: "Developing An Educational Philosophy: If You Don't Stand Up
      for Something, You'll Fall for Almost Anything"
      < http://www.ricklavoie.com/philosophy.html > [accessed 4th June 2005])


      - What some educators have been saying about Waldorf Education
      (source: http://www.waldorfanswers.org/WaldorfComments.htm):

      1. "Ernest L Boyer (1928-1995), Former President, Carnegie Foundation
      for the Advancement of Teaching:

      "Those in the public school reform movement have some important
      things to learn from what Waldorf educators have been doing for many
      years. It is an enormously impressive effort toward quality education,
      and schools would be advised to familiarize themselves with the basic
      assumptions that undergird the Waldorf movement. Art as it helps to
      reveal the use of language, art as it can be revealed in numbers, and
      certainly in nature""

      2. "Thomas Armstrong, Ph D, Author: "In Their Own Way. Discovering and
      Encouraging Your Child's Personal Learning Style":

      "Cultural literacy is the key concern throughout a Waldorf
      program, and here Waldorf educators are also in accord with other
      experts in their field. Apparently many parents are discovering that
      Waldorf fills a need for a creative, artistic approach to learning
      that is hard to find elsewhere."
      (Parenting Magazine, August 1988)"

      3. "Konrad Oberhuber, world leading expert on Raphael, former Director
      of the Museum of Art Albertina in Vienna, former Professor of Fine
      Arts, Harvard University, now at International Christian University,
      Mitaka, Tokyo:

      "No other educational system in the world gives such a central
      role to the arts as the Waldorf school movement. Even mathematics is
      presented in an artistic fashion and related via dance, movement or
      drawing, to the child as a whole. Anything that can be done to further
      these revolutionary educational ideas will be of the greatest
      importance.""

      4. "Douglas Sloan, Ph D, Professor of Education, Teachers College,
      Columbia University:

      "Based on a comprehensive, integrated understanding of the human
      being, a detailed account of child development, and with a curriculum
      and teaching practice that seeks unity of intellectual, emotional and
      ethical development at every point, Waldorf education deserves the
      attention of all concerned with education and the human future.""

      5. "Jack Miller, Professor, Coordinator of Holistic and Aesthetic
      Education in the Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning at
      the University of Toronto:

      "Waldorf education has been an important model of holistic
      education for almost a century. It is one of the very few forms of
      education that acknowledges the soul-life of children and nurtures
      that life. It is truly an education for the whole child and will
      continue to be an important model of education as we move into the
      21st century."
      (Personal statement 14 July, 2002)"

      6. "Paul Bayers, (earlier) Professor at Columbia Teachers' College:

      "The importance of storytelling, of the natural rhythms of daily
      life, of the evolutionary changes in the child, of art as the
      necessary underpinning of learning, and of the aesthetic environment
      as a whole - all basic to Waldorf education for the past 70 years -
      are being "discovered" and verified by researchers unconnected to the
      Waldorf movement.""

      7. "Dee Joy Coulter, Ed.D., Instructor of Neurology and Learning, and
      core faculty member at Naropa University, Colorado, adjunct faculty
      member of the University of Northern Colorado, former Waldorf parent,
      keynote speaker at Waldorf conferences:

      I first heard of Waldorf education about five years ago, after
      having carried out extensive study of the neurological aspects of
      cognition, movement, and maturation. I was delighted to discover such
      a neurologically sound curriculum. I heartily support efforts to
      spread the awareness of Waldorf education and hope that it will spawn
      not only an increase in Waldorf schools, but an infusion of at least
      some of the ideas into the mainstream where they are so sorely needed.
      In Colorado, I am working with several districts to incorporate
      various Waldorf strategies into the teaching of reading and
      mathematics. The ideas are very well received and very much needed.
      (Personal statement, 1984)"

      8. "Jane W. Hippolito, Ph D, Professor of English and Adjunct
      Professor of Liberal Studies, California State University, Fullerton:

      "For the past ten years my teaching responsibilities have
      compelled me to inform myself not just about what would-be teachers
      need to learn. All of my instructionally related research into
      childhood has pointed toward the superiority of Waldorf education over
      all other current educational methods.""

      and (source: http://www.steinercollege.edu/waldorfed.html):

      1. "Programs such as Montessori and the Waldorf Schools offer small
      classes, individualized instruction, and flexible, child-centered
      curricula which can accommodate the child and do not demand that the
      child do all of the accommodating . . . Rudolf Steiner was troubled by
      the overly academic emphasis of schools; he felt that the aesthetic
      side of children was being overlooked and that this should be
      developed along with the intellectual powers. Waldorf schools
      emphasize creativity in all aspects of children's work. The same
      teacher may stay with the same group of children for as many as eight
      grades. In so doing the teacher has to grow and learn with the children.

      - Miseducation: Preschoolers at Risk, David Elkind,
      Ph.D., Professor of Child Study, Tufts University Author,
      The Hurried Child, All Grown Up and No Place to Go; Miseducation:
      Preschoolers at Risk"

      2. "American schools are having a crisis in values. Half the children
      fail according to standard measures and the other half wonder why they
      are learning what they do. As is appropriate to life in a democracy,
      there are a handful of alternatives. Among the alternatives, the
      Waldorf school represents a chance for every child to grow and learn
      according to the most natural rhythms of life. For the early school
      child, this means a non-competitive, non-combative environment in
      which the wonders of science and literature fill the day without
      causing anxiety and confusion. For the older child, it offers a
      curriculum that addresses the question of why they are learning. I
      have sent two of my children to Waldorf schools and they have been
      wonderfully well served.

      - Raymond McDermott,Ph.D.,
      Professor of Education and Anthropology, Stanford University"


      Thanks,

      Keith
    • pete_karaiskos
      Let s not forget: Harvard s Howard Gardner, author of several influential books (among them The Unschooled Mind: How Children Think and How Schools Should
      Message 2 of 11 , Jun 3, 2005
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        Let's not forget:

        "Harvard's Howard Gardner, author of several influential books (among
        them The Unschooled Mind: How Children Think and How Schools Should
        Teach), sees Waldorf education as consistent with his theory of
        multiple human intelligences. 'I like very much the determinedly
        developmental perspective of Waldorf schools -- the realization that
        human development in general, and each child's development in
        particular, has a kind of organic rhythm to it, and its disturbance
        can be very damaging,' he says in the Sept. 25, 2001 issue of the
        Boston Globe."

        "Here is a brief note that you have my permission to circulate
        PROVIDED THAT YOU CIRCULATE THE STATEMENT IN FULL:

        I have not been a student of Waldorf Education but have known about it
        for many years and have praised some of its aspects and features. I
        have also been uncomfortable with some of the esoteric and
        pseudo-scientific concepts that Rudolf Steiner put forth. It has
        recently come to my attention that representatives of the Waldorf
        movement have discouraged open debate about the merits and flaws in
        the Waldorf approach. Such silencing --if true-- is deplorable and
        calls into question the credibility of current representatives of the
        movement. I encourage totally open public debate about the Waldorf
        approach -- all parties will benefit from such discussion. At the same
        time I must note that there are skilled as well as poor examples of
        every educational innovation --Montessori, Waldorf, Dewey, Sizer etc--
        and it is a mistake to judge an entire movement by only its worst, or
        only its best, instantiations.

        With best wishes.

        Howard"


        BUT THEN... ONLY A YEAR LATER AND AFTER ACTUALLY RESEARCHING WALDORF
        EDUCATION THE SAME MAN STATES:

        [Dr. Howard Gardner, Harvard University professor, via email to PLANS
        webmaster dated September 5, 2002]

        "On rare occasions a leader in the Waldorf movement has called for
        full disclosure to parents concerning the Anthroposophic basis of the
        schools. Eugene Schwartz, a respected Waldorf master teacher and
        former director of teacher training at Sunbridge College in Spring
        Valley, New York, says, in a lecture at Sunbridge, November 13, 1999,
        regarding his own daughter's experience in Waldorf: "I'm glad my
        daughter gets to speak about God every morning: that's why I send her
        to a Waldorf school . . . I send my daughter to a Waldorf school so
        that she can have a religious experience . . . when we deny that
        Waldorf schools are giving children religious experiences, we are
        denying the basis of Waldorf education . . . The time has come for us
        to stop pussyfooting around [theories] that will sound too strange if
        we tell parents what we are really doing . . . Tell everybody what we
        are about. The day they walk into the school, let them know...it is
        our responsibility to share with the parents those elements of
        Anthroposophy which will help them understand their children and
        fathom the mysterious ways in which we work. Yes, we are giving the
        children a version of Anthroposophy in the classroom; whether we mean
        to or not, it's there." Schwartz was replaced as director of teacher
        training at Sunbridge shortly after making these public remarks.
        Perhaps other Waldorf leaders are not ready for this level of openness.

        A more typical attitude, disdainful of parents who question what their
        children are being exposed to, is expressed by Roy Wilkinson, who has
        been involved with Waldorf and Anthroposophy for over 60 years, first
        as a student, then as a teacher, lecturer and writer: "It has been
        known for parents to say that they like the school, but wish it were
        divorced from certain 'crazy' ideas which they may have garnered, or
        which a teacher may have expressed. The Waldorf school and the 'crazy'
        ideas are, however, inseparable. Waldorf schools would not exist if
        they were not related to these ideas." (Roy Wilkinson, "The Spiritual
        Basis of Steiner Education: The Waldorf School Approach," Sophia
        Books, Rudolf Steiner Press, 1996.)

        Parents should be told that the science and history curriculum will be
        based on Steiner's reading of the "Akashic Record," according to which
        the "ancients" had clairvoyant powers which Anthroposophic initiation
        may help students attain some day. They should be told that loyal
        Steiner followers believe humans once lived on the lost continent of
        Atlantis and will one day live on Venus, Jupiter, and Vulcan. They
        should be told that teachers study a medieval scheme in which race,
        blood, and the "four temperaments" will help them understand their
        students' development. Not all Waldorf teachers believe the "wacky"
        things Steiner said, but many are deeply involved in Steiner study
        (faculty meetings generally include a Steiner study session). Teachers
        typically do not discuss Anthroposophy with parents."


        Pete here:
        THIS is exactly why I don't put much stock in superficial observations
        of Waldorf education. One has to really look closely to find what is
        really going on.

        Pete


        --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "kmlightseeker"
        <kmlightseeker@y...> wrote:
        > I think we have to realise the fluidity of approaches and pathways and
        > participation in the education area:
        >
        >
        > (i)
        >
        > "Main Entry: ed·u·ca·tor
        > Pronunciation: 'e-j&-"kA-t&r
        > Function: noun
        > 1 : one skilled in teaching : TEACHER
        > 2 a : a student of the theory and practice of education : EDUCATIONIST
        > 2 b : an administrator in education"
        >
        > (source: Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary
        > < http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=educator >)
        >
        >
        > (ii)
        >
        > "In education, teachers are those who teach students or pupils, often
        > a course of study or a practical skill, including learning and
        > thinking skills. There are many different ways to teach and help
        > students learn. This is often refered to as the teacher's pedagogy.
        > When deciding what teaching method to use, a teacher will need to
        > consider students' background knowledge, environment, and their
        > learning goals."
        >
        > (source: "Teacher" < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Educationalist >
        > [accessed 4th June 2005])
        >
        >
        > (iii)
        >
        > "Challenges in education
        >
        > The goal of education is the transference of ideas from one person to
        > another, or from one person to a group. Can a group of people educate?
        > Problems with the current public education sytem include: the method
        > of knowledge delivery, how to determine what knowledge should be
        > taught, the use and relevancy of the imparted knowledge, and how well
        > the pupil will retain incoming knowledge.
        >
        > In addition to the ability to the "Three R's", reading, writing, and
        > 'rithmetic, Western primary and secondary schools attempt to teach the
        > basic principles of history, mathematics, including calculus and
        > algebra, physics, chemistry, and sometimes politics, in the hope that
        > students will retain and use this knowledge as they age. The current
        > education system measures competency with tests and assignments and
        > then assigns each student a corresponding grade. The grades usually
        > come in the form of either a letter grade or a percentage, which
        > ideally represents the amount of all material presented in class that
        > the student understood. These grades do not reveal the strengths and
        > weaknesses of a student. Many feel this grading scheme risks lowering
        > students self-esteem and self-confidence, as students may receive poor
        > marks for reasons unrelated to their level of intellegence or
        > capability, for example poverty, abuse, lack of interest in the
        > material, prejudiced or incompetent teachers, uncomfortable
        > classrooms, etc.
        >
        > Albert Einstein, one of the most famous physicist of our time,
        > credited with helping us understand the universe better, was not a
        > model school student. He was uninterested in what was being taught,
        > and he did not attend classes all the time. However, his gifts
        > eventually shone through and added to the sum of human knowledge.
        >
        > Every child has certain gifts and abilities, but early and later
        > childhood education rarely tries to find out what that may be and help
        > the students develop that. If children are good at something they will
        > excel in that subject, and if they do not, they may not do as well.
        >
        > This brings us to a major critique of modern western education. It
        > exposes children to a wide variety of disciplines which is good, but
        > subjects are taught, tested, and then the children are generally not
        > required to remember the content from before. Time is always spent in
        > mathematics classes reteaching students the basic concepts they should
        > know from the year before, because students have forgotten most of it.
        >
        > There are also some dilemas about the teaching of knowledge. Should
        > some knowledge be forgotten? What should be taught, are we better off
        > knowing how to build nuclear bombs, or is it best to let such
        > knowledge be forgotten?"
        >
        > (source: "Education" <
        >
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Educator#Recent_world-wide_educational_trends
        > > [accessed 4th June 2005])
        >
        >
        > - Here are some educators (go down to "Editorial", and click on the
        > coloured names to see the individual's bios), and their qualifications
        > and experiences all differ: some are theorists, others have a more
        > direct experience - in the main, they are academics or lecturers:
        >
        > source: http://www.infed.org/about_us.htm
        >
        >
        > - "When attempting to assist a weak, struggling or ineffective
        > teacher, one often notes that the teacher has no established
        > philosophy of education; no roots, no belief system, no standard upon
        > which she is able to base her policies and practices in the classroom.
        > She embraces every new technique as her own and tends to define
        > progress as adopting what is new because it is new; abandoning what is
        > old because it is old. Conversely, the talented and effective educator
        > seems to base her every action upon the firm foundation of an
        > established philosophy or belief system. Her strength flows from that
        > philosophy and she accepts or rejects materials or practices based
        > upon their compatibility with her established philosophical concepts.
        > This belief system has developed over time and has been adapted,
        > modified and molded by the colleagues and clients that she has
        > interacted with throughout her career.
        >
        > Little is done in our teacher training institutions to encourage the
        > young professional to develop or examine her own educational
        > philosophy. Administrators sometimes ask for the applicant's
        > educational philosophy in an initial job interview, but the
        > prospective teacher is seldom required to defend these beliefs with
        > theoretical or pragmatic evidence."
        >
        > (source: "Developing An Educational Philosophy: If You Don't Stand Up
        > for Something, You'll Fall for Almost Anything"
        > < http://www.ricklavoie.com/philosophy.html > [accessed 4th June 2005])
        >
        >
        > - What some educators have been saying about Waldorf Education
        > (source: http://www.waldorfanswers.org/WaldorfComments.htm):
        >
        > 1. "Ernest L Boyer (1928-1995), Former President, Carnegie Foundation
        > for the Advancement of Teaching:
        >
        > "Those in the public school reform movement have some important
        > things to learn from what Waldorf educators have been doing for many
        > years. It is an enormously impressive effort toward quality education,
        > and schools would be advised to familiarize themselves with the basic
        > assumptions that undergird the Waldorf movement. Art as it helps to
        > reveal the use of language, art as it can be revealed in numbers, and
        > certainly in nature""
        >
        > 2. "Thomas Armstrong, Ph D, Author: "In Their Own Way. Discovering and
        > Encouraging Your Child's Personal Learning Style":
        >
        > "Cultural literacy is the key concern throughout a Waldorf
        > program, and here Waldorf educators are also in accord with other
        > experts in their field. Apparently many parents are discovering that
        > Waldorf fills a need for a creative, artistic approach to learning
        > that is hard to find elsewhere."
        > (Parenting Magazine, August 1988)"
        >
        > 3. "Konrad Oberhuber, world leading expert on Raphael, former Director
        > of the Museum of Art Albertina in Vienna, former Professor of Fine
        > Arts, Harvard University, now at International Christian University,
        > Mitaka, Tokyo:
        >
        > "No other educational system in the world gives such a central
        > role to the arts as the Waldorf school movement. Even mathematics is
        > presented in an artistic fashion and related via dance, movement or
        > drawing, to the child as a whole. Anything that can be done to further
        > these revolutionary educational ideas will be of the greatest
        > importance.""
        >
        > 4. "Douglas Sloan, Ph D, Professor of Education, Teachers College,
        > Columbia University:
        >
        > "Based on a comprehensive, integrated understanding of the human
        > being, a detailed account of child development, and with a curriculum
        > and teaching practice that seeks unity of intellectual, emotional and
        > ethical development at every point, Waldorf education deserves the
        > attention of all concerned with education and the human future.""
        >
        > 5. "Jack Miller, Professor, Coordinator of Holistic and Aesthetic
        > Education in the Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning at
        > the University of Toronto:
        >
        > "Waldorf education has been an important model of holistic
        > education for almost a century. It is one of the very few forms of
        > education that acknowledges the soul-life of children and nurtures
        > that life. It is truly an education for the whole child and will
        > continue to be an important model of education as we move into the
        > 21st century."
        > (Personal statement 14 July, 2002)"
        >
        > 6. "Paul Bayers, (earlier) Professor at Columbia Teachers' College:
        >
        > "The importance of storytelling, of the natural rhythms of daily
        > life, of the evolutionary changes in the child, of art as the
        > necessary underpinning of learning, and of the aesthetic environment
        > as a whole - all basic to Waldorf education for the past 70 years -
        > are being "discovered" and verified by researchers unconnected to the
        > Waldorf movement.""
        >
        > 7. "Dee Joy Coulter, Ed.D., Instructor of Neurology and Learning, and
        > core faculty member at Naropa University, Colorado, adjunct faculty
        > member of the University of Northern Colorado, former Waldorf parent,
        > keynote speaker at Waldorf conferences:
        >
        > I first heard of Waldorf education about five years ago, after
        > having carried out extensive study of the neurological aspects of
        > cognition, movement, and maturation. I was delighted to discover such
        > a neurologically sound curriculum. I heartily support efforts to
        > spread the awareness of Waldorf education and hope that it will spawn
        > not only an increase in Waldorf schools, but an infusion of at least
        > some of the ideas into the mainstream where they are so sorely needed.
        > In Colorado, I am working with several districts to incorporate
        > various Waldorf strategies into the teaching of reading and
        > mathematics. The ideas are very well received and very much needed.
        > (Personal statement, 1984)"
        >
        > 8. "Jane W. Hippolito, Ph D, Professor of English and Adjunct
        > Professor of Liberal Studies, California State University, Fullerton:
        >
        > "For the past ten years my teaching responsibilities have
        > compelled me to inform myself not just about what would-be teachers
        > need to learn. All of my instructionally related research into
        > childhood has pointed toward the superiority of Waldorf education over
        > all other current educational methods.""
        >
        > and (source: http://www.steinercollege.edu/waldorfed.html):
        >
        > 1. "Programs such as Montessori and the Waldorf Schools offer small
        > classes, individualized instruction, and flexible, child-centered
        > curricula which can accommodate the child and do not demand that the
        > child do all of the accommodating . . . Rudolf Steiner was troubled by
        > the overly academic emphasis of schools; he felt that the aesthetic
        > side of children was being overlooked and that this should be
        > developed along with the intellectual powers. Waldorf schools
        > emphasize creativity in all aspects of children's work. The same
        > teacher may stay with the same group of children for as many as eight
        > grades. In so doing the teacher has to grow and learn with the children.
        >
        > - Miseducation: Preschoolers at Risk, David Elkind,
        > Ph.D., Professor of Child Study, Tufts University Author,
        > The Hurried Child, All Grown Up and No Place to Go; Miseducation:
        > Preschoolers at Risk"
        >
        > 2. "American schools are having a crisis in values. Half the children
        > fail according to standard measures and the other half wonder why they
        > are learning what they do. As is appropriate to life in a democracy,
        > there are a handful of alternatives. Among the alternatives, the
        > Waldorf school represents a chance for every child to grow and learn
        > according to the most natural rhythms of life. For the early school
        > child, this means a non-competitive, non-combative environment in
        > which the wonders of science and literature fill the day without
        > causing anxiety and confusion. For the older child, it offers a
        > curriculum that addresses the question of why they are learning. I
        > have sent two of my children to Waldorf schools and they have been
        > wonderfully well served.
        >
        > - Raymond McDermott,Ph.D.,
        > Professor of Education and Anthropology, Stanford University"
        >
        >
        > Thanks,
        >
        > Keith
      • Frank Thomas Smith
        ... Since we re using the conditional, it may also be that you thought you wouldn t get caught doing so. Frank
        Message 3 of 11 , Jun 3, 2005
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          > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "Linda Clemens"
          > <.> wrote:
          > > Pete, I'm going to give you the benefit of the doubt that you didn't
          > > mean to forge Gardner's signature at the end of this. Maybe
          > > somebody's been messing with your head.
          >
          > It may be that I ran two files together.
          >
          > Pete
          >
          Since we're using the conditional, it may also be that you thought you
          wouldn't get caught doing so.

          Frank
        • dottie zold
          Hey Keith, Would you consider creating a WE information page specifically on the things you are finding such as the information below. I think it would be
          Message 4 of 11 , Jun 3, 2005
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            Hey Keith,

            Would you consider creating a WE information page specifically on the
            things you are finding such as the information below. I think it
            would be wonderful but if you do not have the time maybe you can put
            a file here on list that can be accessed for those wishing to recall
            these wonderful bits of information that exists pertaining to WE.

            All good things,
            Dottie

            > I think we have to realise the fluidity of approaches and pathways
            and
            > participation in the education area:
            >
            >
            > (i)
            >
            > "Main Entry: ed·u·ca·tor
            > Pronunciation: 'e-j&-"kA-t&r
            > Function: noun
            > 1 : one skilled in teaching : TEACHER
            > 2 a : a student of the theory and practice of education :
            EDUCATIONIST
            > 2 b : an administrator in education"
            >
            > (source: Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary
            > < http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=educator
            >)
            >
            >
            > (ii)
            >
            > "In education, teachers are those who teach students or pupils,
            often
            > a course of study or a practical skill, including learning and
            > thinking skills. There are many different ways to teach and help
            > students learn. This is often refered to as the teacher's pedagogy.
            > When deciding what teaching method to use, a teacher will need to
            > consider students' background knowledge, environment, and their
            > learning goals."
            >
            > (source: "Teacher" < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Educationalist >
            > [accessed 4th June 2005])
            >
            >
            > (iii)
            >
            > "Challenges in education
            >
            > The goal of education is the transference of ideas from one person
            to
            > another, or from one person to a group. Can a group of people
            educate?
            > Problems with the current public education sytem include: the method
            > of knowledge delivery, how to determine what knowledge should be
            > taught, the use and relevancy of the imparted knowledge, and how
            well
            > the pupil will retain incoming knowledge.
            >
            > In addition to the ability to the "Three R's", reading, writing, and
            > 'rithmetic, Western primary and secondary schools attempt to teach
            the
            > basic principles of history, mathematics, including calculus and
            > algebra, physics, chemistry, and sometimes politics, in the hope
            that
            > students will retain and use this knowledge as they age. The current
            > education system measures competency with tests and assignments and
            > then assigns each student a corresponding grade. The grades usually
            > come in the form of either a letter grade or a percentage, which
            > ideally represents the amount of all material presented in class
            that
            > the student understood. These grades do not reveal the strengths and
            > weaknesses of a student. Many feel this grading scheme risks
            lowering
            > students self-esteem and self-confidence, as students may receive
            poor
            > marks for reasons unrelated to their level of intellegence or
            > capability, for example poverty, abuse, lack of interest in the
            > material, prejudiced or incompetent teachers, uncomfortable
            > classrooms, etc.
            >
            > Albert Einstein, one of the most famous physicist of our time,
            > credited with helping us understand the universe better, was not a
            > model school student. He was uninterested in what was being taught,
            > and he did not attend classes all the time. However, his gifts
            > eventually shone through and added to the sum of human knowledge.
            >
            > Every child has certain gifts and abilities, but early and later
            > childhood education rarely tries to find out what that may be and
            help
            > the students develop that. If children are good at something they
            will
            > excel in that subject, and if they do not, they may not do as well.
            >
            > This brings us to a major critique of modern western education. It
            > exposes children to a wide variety of disciplines which is good, but
            > subjects are taught, tested, and then the children are generally not
            > required to remember the content from before. Time is always spent
            in
            > mathematics classes reteaching students the basic concepts they
            should
            > know from the year before, because students have forgotten most of
            it.
            >
            > There are also some dilemas about the teaching of knowledge. Should
            > some knowledge be forgotten? What should be taught, are we better
            off
            > knowing how to build nuclear bombs, or is it best to let such
            > knowledge be forgotten?"
            >
            > (source: "Education" <
            > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Educator#Recent_world-
            wide_educational_trends
            > > [accessed 4th June 2005])
            >
            >
            > - Here are some educators (go down to "Editorial", and click on the
            > coloured names to see the individual's bios), and their
            qualifications
            > and experiences all differ: some are theorists, others have a more
            > direct experience - in the main, they are academics or lecturers:
            >
            > source: http://www.infed.org/about_us.htm
            >
            >
            > - "When attempting to assist a weak, struggling or ineffective
            > teacher, one often notes that the teacher has no established
            > philosophy of education; no roots, no belief system, no standard
            upon
            > which she is able to base her policies and practices in the
            classroom.
            > She embraces every new technique as her own and tends to define
            > progress as adopting what is new because it is new; abandoning what
            is
            > old because it is old. Conversely, the talented and effective
            educator
            > seems to base her every action upon the firm foundation of an
            > established philosophy or belief system. Her strength flows from
            that
            > philosophy and she accepts or rejects materials or practices based
            > upon their compatibility with her established philosophical
            concepts.
            > This belief system has developed over time and has been adapted,
            > modified and molded by the colleagues and clients that she has
            > interacted with throughout her career.
            >
            > Little is done in our teacher training institutions to encourage the
            > young professional to develop or examine her own educational
            > philosophy. Administrators sometimes ask for the applicant's
            > educational philosophy in an initial job interview, but the
            > prospective teacher is seldom required to defend these beliefs with
            > theoretical or pragmatic evidence."
            >
            > (source: "Developing An Educational Philosophy: If You Don't Stand
            Up
            > for Something, You'll Fall for Almost Anything"
            > < http://www.ricklavoie.com/philosophy.html > [accessed 4th June
            2005])
            >
            >
            > - What some educators have been saying about Waldorf Education
            > (source: http://www.waldorfanswers.org/WaldorfComments.htm):
            >
            > 1. "Ernest L Boyer (1928-1995), Former President, Carnegie
            Foundation
            > for the Advancement of Teaching:
            >
            > "Those in the public school reform movement have some important
            > things to learn from what Waldorf educators have been doing for many
            > years. It is an enormously impressive effort toward quality
            education,
            > and schools would be advised to familiarize themselves with the
            basic
            > assumptions that undergird the Waldorf movement. Art as it helps to
            > reveal the use of language, art as it can be revealed in numbers,
            and
            > certainly in nature""
            >
            > 2. "Thomas Armstrong, Ph D, Author: "In Their Own Way. Discovering
            and
            > Encouraging Your Child's Personal Learning Style":
            >
            > "Cultural literacy is the key concern throughout a Waldorf
            > program, and here Waldorf educators are also in accord with other
            > experts in their field. Apparently many parents are discovering that
            > Waldorf fills a need for a creative, artistic approach to learning
            > that is hard to find elsewhere."
            > (Parenting Magazine, August 1988)"
            >
            > 3. "Konrad Oberhuber, world leading expert on Raphael, former
            Director
            > of the Museum of Art Albertina in Vienna, former Professor of Fine
            > Arts, Harvard University, now at International Christian University,
            > Mitaka, Tokyo:
            >
            > "No other educational system in the world gives such a central
            > role to the arts as the Waldorf school movement. Even mathematics is
            > presented in an artistic fashion and related via dance, movement or
            > drawing, to the child as a whole. Anything that can be done to
            further
            > these revolutionary educational ideas will be of the greatest
            > importance.""
            >
            > 4. "Douglas Sloan, Ph D, Professor of Education, Teachers College,
            > Columbia University:
            >
            > "Based on a comprehensive, integrated understanding of the human
            > being, a detailed account of child development, and with a
            curriculum
            > and teaching practice that seeks unity of intellectual, emotional
            and
            > ethical development at every point, Waldorf education deserves the
            > attention of all concerned with education and the human future.""
            >
            > 5. "Jack Miller, Professor, Coordinator of Holistic and Aesthetic
            > Education in the Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning at
            > the University of Toronto:
            >
            > "Waldorf education has been an important model of holistic
            > education for almost a century. It is one of the very few forms of
            > education that acknowledges the soul-life of children and nurtures
            > that life. It is truly an education for the whole child and will
            > continue to be an important model of education as we move into the
            > 21st century."
            > (Personal statement 14 July, 2002)"
            >
            > 6. "Paul Bayers, (earlier) Professor at Columbia Teachers' College:
            >
            > "The importance of storytelling, of the natural rhythms of daily
            > life, of the evolutionary changes in the child, of art as the
            > necessary underpinning of learning, and of the aesthetic environment
            > as a whole - all basic to Waldorf education for the past 70 years -
            > are being "discovered" and verified by researchers unconnected to
            the
            > Waldorf movement.""
            >
            > 7. "Dee Joy Coulter, Ed.D., Instructor of Neurology and Learning,
            and
            > core faculty member at Naropa University, Colorado, adjunct faculty
            > member of the University of Northern Colorado, former Waldorf
            parent,
            > keynote speaker at Waldorf conferences:
            >
            > I first heard of Waldorf education about five years ago, after
            > having carried out extensive study of the neurological aspects of
            > cognition, movement, and maturation. I was delighted to discover
            such
            > a neurologically sound curriculum. I heartily support efforts to
            > spread the awareness of Waldorf education and hope that it will
            spawn
            > not only an increase in Waldorf schools, but an infusion of at least
            > some of the ideas into the mainstream where they are so sorely
            needed.
            > In Colorado, I am working with several districts to incorporate
            > various Waldorf strategies into the teaching of reading and
            > mathematics. The ideas are very well received and very much needed.
            > (Personal statement, 1984)"
            >
            > 8. "Jane W. Hippolito, Ph D, Professor of English and Adjunct
            > Professor of Liberal Studies, California State University,
            Fullerton:
            >
            > "For the past ten years my teaching responsibilities have
            > compelled me to inform myself not just about what would-be teachers
            > need to learn. All of my instructionally related research into
            > childhood has pointed toward the superiority of Waldorf education
            over
            > all other current educational methods.""
            >
            > and (source: http://www.steinercollege.edu/waldorfed.html):
            >
            > 1. "Programs such as Montessori and the Waldorf Schools offer small
            > classes, individualized instruction, and flexible, child-centered
            > curricula which can accommodate the child and do not demand that the
            > child do all of the accommodating . . . Rudolf Steiner was troubled
            by
            > the overly academic emphasis of schools; he felt that the aesthetic
            > side of children was being overlooked and that this should be
            > developed along with the intellectual powers. Waldorf schools
            > emphasize creativity in all aspects of children's work. The same
            > teacher may stay with the same group of children for as many as
            eight
            > grades. In so doing the teacher has to grow and learn with the
            children.
            >
            > - Miseducation: Preschoolers at Risk, David Elkind,
            > Ph.D., Professor of Child Study, Tufts University Author,
            > The Hurried Child, All Grown Up and No Place to Go; Miseducation:
            > Preschoolers at Risk"
            >
            > 2. "American schools are having a crisis in values. Half the
            children
            > fail according to standard measures and the other half wonder why
            they
            > are learning what they do. As is appropriate to life in a democracy,
            > there are a handful of alternatives. Among the alternatives, the
            > Waldorf school represents a chance for every child to grow and learn
            > according to the most natural rhythms of life. For the early school
            > child, this means a non-competitive, non-combative environment in
            > which the wonders of science and literature fill the day without
            > causing anxiety and confusion. For the older child, it offers a
            > curriculum that addresses the question of why they are learning. I
            > have sent two of my children to Waldorf schools and they have been
            > wonderfully well served.
            >
            > - Raymond McDermott,Ph.D.,
            > Professor of Education and Anthropology, Stanford University"
            >
            >
            > Thanks,
            >
            > Keith
          • pete_karaiskos
            I would never forge anything. This is a cut and paste from a file. If it s a forgery, it s someone elses doing - not mine. Pete
            Message 5 of 11 , Jun 3, 2005
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              I would never forge anything. This is a cut and paste from a file.
              If it's a forgery, it's someone elses doing - not mine.

              Pete

              --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "Linda Clemens"
              <aesopo_aeternus@y...> wrote:
              > Pete, I'm going to give you the benefit of the doubt that you didn't
              > mean to forge Gardner's signature at the end of this. Maybe
              > somebody's been messing with your head.
              >
              > ****PLANS****** wrote this, not Howard Gardner. I have a hard time
              > believing this is an innocent mistake, since a KEY identifying
              > paragraph has been omitted where I put the &&&&. The paragraph that
              > is missing says:
              >
              > "PLANS would like to see Waldorf schools advise parents up front that
              > the teacher's interactions with their child will be guided by their
              > belief in karma and reincarnation, which leads some Waldorf teachers
              > to speculate that a child may have been born to the "wrong" parents,
              > for instance, or may have been drawn "karmically" to the Waldorf
              > school even against the parent's wishes. "
              >
              > Hmmmm...... This forgery is even clumsier and more poorly executed
              > than the one that brought down Dan Rather.
              >
              > http://www.waldorfcritics.org/active/concerns.html
              >
              > PS---You know something funny? I don't think Howard Gardner was ever
              > a classroom teacher. What the hell is he doing trying to tell
              > teachers how to teach? [sarcasm].
              >
              > Linda
              >
              > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "pete_karaiskos"
              > <petekaraiskos@s...> wrote:
              > > Let's not forget:
              >
              > >
              > > BUT THEN... ONLY A YEAR LATER AND AFTER ACTUALLY RESEARCHING WALDORF
              > > EDUCATION THE SAME MAN STATES:
              > >
              > > [Dr. Howard Gardner, Harvard University professor, via email to
              > PLANS
              > > webmaster dated September 5, 2002]
              > >
              > > "On rare occasions a leader in the Waldorf movement has called for
              > > full disclosure to parents concerning the Anthroposophic basis of
              > the
              > > schools. Eugene Schwartz, a respected Waldorf master teacher and
              > > former director of teacher training at Sunbridge College in Spring
              > > Valley, New York, says, in a lecture at Sunbridge, November 13,
              > 1999,
              > > regarding his own daughter's experience in Waldorf: "I'm glad my
              > > daughter gets to speak about God every morning: that's why I send
              > her
              > > to a Waldorf school . . . I send my daughter to a Waldorf school so
              > > that she can have a religious experience . . . when we deny that
              > > Waldorf schools are giving children religious experiences, we are
              > > denying the basis of Waldorf education . . . The time has come for
              > us
              > > to stop pussyfooting around [theories] that will sound too strange
              > if
              > > we tell parents what we are really doing . . . Tell everybody what
              > we
              > > are about. The day they walk into the school, let them know...it is
              > > our responsibility to share with the parents those elements of
              > > Anthroposophy which will help them understand their children and
              > > fathom the mysterious ways in which we work. Yes, we are giving the
              > > children a version of Anthroposophy in the classroom; whether we
              > mean
              > > to or not, it's there." Schwartz was replaced as director of teacher
              > > training at Sunbridge shortly after making these public remarks.
              > > Perhaps other Waldorf leaders are not ready for this level of
              > openness.
              > >
              > > A more typical attitude, disdainful of parents who question what
              > their
              > > children are being exposed to, is expressed by Roy Wilkinson, who
              > has
              > > been involved with Waldorf and Anthroposophy for over 60 years,
              > first
              > > as a student, then as a teacher, lecturer and writer: "It has been
              > > known for parents to say that they like the school, but wish it were
              > > divorced from certain 'crazy' ideas which they may have garnered, or
              > > which a teacher may have expressed. The Waldorf school and
              > the 'crazy'
              > > ideas are, however, inseparable. Waldorf schools would not exist if
              > > they were not related to these ideas." (Roy Wilkinson, "The
              > Spiritual
              > > Basis of Steiner Education: The Waldorf School Approach," Sophia
              > > Books, Rudolf Steiner Press, 1996.)
              > >
              >
              > &&&&&&&
              > > Parents should be told that the science and history curriculum will
              > be
              > > based on Steiner's reading of the "Akashic Record," according to
              > which
              > > the "ancients" had clairvoyant powers which Anthroposophic
              > initiation
              > > may help students attain some day. They should be told that loyal
              > > Steiner followers believe humans once lived on the lost continent of
              > > Atlantis and will one day live on Venus, Jupiter, and Vulcan. They
              > > should be told that teachers study a medieval scheme in which race,
              > > blood, and the "four temperaments" will help them understand their
              > > students' development. Not all Waldorf teachers believe the "wacky"
              > > things Steiner said, but many are deeply involved in Steiner study
              > > (faculty meetings generally include a Steiner study session).
              > Teachers
              > > typically do not discuss Anthroposophy with parents."
              > >
              > >
              > > Pete here:
              > > THIS is exactly why I don't put much stock in superficial
              > observations
              > > of Waldorf education. One has to really look closely to find what
              > is
              > > really going on.
              > >
              > > Pete
              > >
              > >
              > > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "kmlightseeker"
              > > <kmlightseeker@y...> wrote:
              > > > I think we have to realise the fluidity of approaches and
              > pathways and
              > > > participation in the education area:
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > (i)
              > > >
              > > > "Main Entry: ed·u·ca·tor
              > > > Pronunciation: 'e-j&-"kA-t&r
              > > > Function: noun
              > > > 1 : one skilled in teaching : TEACHER
              > > > 2 a : a student of the theory and practice of education :
              > EDUCATIONIST
              > > > 2 b : an administrator in education"
              > > >
              > > > (source: Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary
              > > > < http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?
              > book=Dictionary&va=educator >)
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > (ii)
              > > >
              > > > "In education, teachers are those who teach students or pupils,
              > often
              > > > a course of study or a practical skill, including learning and
              > > > thinking skills. There are many different ways to teach and help
              > > > students learn. This is often refered to as the teacher's
              > pedagogy.
              > > > When deciding what teaching method to use, a teacher will need to
              > > > consider students' background knowledge, environment, and their
              > > > learning goals."
              > > >
              > > > (source: "Teacher" < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Educationalist >
              > > > [accessed 4th June 2005])
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > (iii)
              > > >
              > > > "Challenges in education
              > > >
              > > > The goal of education is the transference of ideas from one
              > person to
              > > > another, or from one person to a group. Can a group of people
              > educate?
              > > > Problems with the current public education sytem include: the
              > method
              > > > of knowledge delivery, how to determine what knowledge should be
              > > > taught, the use and relevancy of the imparted knowledge, and how
              > well
              > > > the pupil will retain incoming knowledge.
              > > >
              > > > In addition to the ability to the "Three R's", reading, writing,
              > and
              > > > 'rithmetic, Western primary and secondary schools attempt to
              > teach the
              > > > basic principles of history, mathematics, including calculus and
              > > > algebra, physics, chemistry, and sometimes politics, in the hope
              > that
              > > > students will retain and use this knowledge as they age. The
              > current
              > > > education system measures competency with tests and assignments
              > and
              > > > then assigns each student a corresponding grade. The grades
              > usually
              > > > come in the form of either a letter grade or a percentage, which
              > > > ideally represents the amount of all material presented in class
              > that
              > > > the student understood. These grades do not reveal the strengths
              > and
              > > > weaknesses of a student. Many feel this grading scheme risks
              > lowering
              > > > students self-esteem and self-confidence, as students may receive
              > poor
              > > > marks for reasons unrelated to their level of intellegence or
              > > > capability, for example poverty, abuse, lack of interest in the
              > > > material, prejudiced or incompetent teachers, uncomfortable
              > > > classrooms, etc.
              > > >
              > > > Albert Einstein, one of the most famous physicist of our time,
              > > > credited with helping us understand the universe better, was not a
              > > > model school student. He was uninterested in what was being
              > taught,
              > > > and he did not attend classes all the time. However, his gifts
              > > > eventually shone through and added to the sum of human knowledge.
              > > >
              > > > Every child has certain gifts and abilities, but early and later
              > > > childhood education rarely tries to find out what that may be and
              > help
              > > > the students develop that. If children are good at something they
              > will
              > > > excel in that subject, and if they do not, they may not do as
              > well.
              > > >
              > > > This brings us to a major critique of modern western education. It
              > > > exposes children to a wide variety of disciplines which is good,
              > but
              > > > subjects are taught, tested, and then the children are generally
              > not
              > > > required to remember the content from before. Time is always
              > spent in
              > > > mathematics classes reteaching students the basic concepts they
              > should
              > > > know from the year before, because students have forgotten most
              > of it.
              > > >
              > > > There are also some dilemas about the teaching of knowledge.
              > Should
              > > > some knowledge be forgotten? What should be taught, are we better
              > off
              > > > knowing how to build nuclear bombs, or is it best to let such
              > > > knowledge be forgotten?"
              > > >
              > > > (source: "Education" <
              > > >
              > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Educator#Recent_world-
              > wide_educational_trends
              > > > > [accessed 4th June 2005])
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > - Here are some educators (go down to "Editorial", and click on
              > the
              > > > coloured names to see the individual's bios), and their
              > qualifications
              > > > and experiences all differ: some are theorists, others have a more
              > > > direct experience - in the main, they are academics or lecturers:
              > > >
              > > > source: http://www.infed.org/about_us.htm
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > - "When attempting to assist a weak, struggling or ineffective
              > > > teacher, one often notes that the teacher has no established
              > > > philosophy of education; no roots, no belief system, no standard
              > upon
              > > > which she is able to base her policies and practices in the
              > classroom.
              > > > She embraces every new technique as her own and tends to define
              > > > progress as adopting what is new because it is new; abandoning
              > what is
              > > > old because it is old. Conversely, the talented and effective
              > educator
              > > > seems to base her every action upon the firm foundation of an
              > > > established philosophy or belief system. Her strength flows from
              > that
              > > > philosophy and she accepts or rejects materials or practices based
              > > > upon their compatibility with her established philosophical
              > concepts.
              > > > This belief system has developed over time and has been adapted,
              > > > modified and molded by the colleagues and clients that she has
              > > > interacted with throughout her career.
              > > >
              > > > Little is done in our teacher training institutions to encourage
              > the
              > > > young professional to develop or examine her own educational
              > > > philosophy. Administrators sometimes ask for the applicant's
              > > > educational philosophy in an initial job interview, but the
              > > > prospective teacher is seldom required to defend these beliefs
              > with
              > > > theoretical or pragmatic evidence."
              > > >
              > > > (source: "Developing An Educational Philosophy: If You Don't
              > Stand Up
              > > > for Something, You'll Fall for Almost Anything"
              > > > < http://www.ricklavoie.com/philosophy.html > [accessed 4th June
              > 2005])
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > - What some educators have been saying about Waldorf Education
              > > > (source: http://www.waldorfanswers.org/WaldorfComments.htm):
              > > >
              > > > 1. "Ernest L Boyer (1928-1995), Former President, Carnegie
              > Foundation
              > > > for the Advancement of Teaching:
              > > >
              > > > "Those in the public school reform movement have some important
              > > > things to learn from what Waldorf educators have been doing for
              > many
              > > > years. It is an enormously impressive effort toward quality
              > education,
              > > > and schools would be advised to familiarize themselves with the
              > basic
              > > > assumptions that undergird the Waldorf movement. Art as it helps
              > to
              > > > reveal the use of language, art as it can be revealed in numbers,
              > and
              > > > certainly in nature""
              > > >
              > > > 2. "Thomas Armstrong, Ph D, Author: "In Their Own Way.
              > Discovering and
              > > > Encouraging Your Child's Personal Learning Style":
              > > >
              > > > "Cultural literacy is the key concern throughout a Waldorf
              > > > program, and here Waldorf educators are also in accord with other
              > > > experts in their field. Apparently many parents are discovering
              > that
              > > > Waldorf fills a need for a creative, artistic approach to learning
              > > > that is hard to find elsewhere."
              > > > (Parenting Magazine, August 1988)"
              > > >
              > > > 3. "Konrad Oberhuber, world leading expert on Raphael, former
              > Director
              > > > of the Museum of Art Albertina in Vienna, former Professor of Fine
              > > > Arts, Harvard University, now at International Christian
              > University,
              > > > Mitaka, Tokyo:
              > > >
              > > > "No other educational system in the world gives such a central
              > > > role to the arts as the Waldorf school movement. Even mathematics
              > is
              > > > presented in an artistic fashion and related via dance, movement
              > or
              > > > drawing, to the child as a whole. Anything that can be done to
              > further
              > > > these revolutionary educational ideas will be of the greatest
              > > > importance.""
              > > >
              > > > 4. "Douglas Sloan, Ph D, Professor of Education, Teachers College,
              > > > Columbia University:
              > > >
              > > > "Based on a comprehensive, integrated understanding of the human
              > > > being, a detailed account of child development, and with a
              > curriculum
              > > > and teaching practice that seeks unity of intellectual, emotional
              > and
              > > > ethical development at every point, Waldorf education deserves the
              > > > attention of all concerned with education and the human future.""
              > > >
              > > > 5. "Jack Miller, Professor, Coordinator of Holistic and Aesthetic
              > > > Education in the Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning
              > at
              > > > the University of Toronto:
              > > >
              > > > "Waldorf education has been an important model of holistic
              > > > education for almost a century. It is one of the very few forms of
              > > > education that acknowledges the soul-life of children and nurtures
              > > > that life. It is truly an education for the whole child and will
              > > > continue to be an important model of education as we move into the
              > > > 21st century."
              > > > (Personal statement 14 July, 2002)"
              > > >
              > > > 6. "Paul Bayers, (earlier) Professor at Columbia Teachers'
              > College:
              > > >
              > > > "The importance of storytelling, of the natural rhythms of daily
              > > > life, of the evolutionary changes in the child, of art as the
              > > > necessary underpinning of learning, and of the aesthetic
              > environment
              > > > as a whole - all basic to Waldorf education for the past 70
              > years -
              > > > are being "discovered" and verified by researchers unconnected to
              > the
              > > > Waldorf movement.""
              > > >
              > > > 7. "Dee Joy Coulter, Ed.D., Instructor of Neurology and Learning,
              > and
              > > > core faculty member at Naropa University, Colorado, adjunct
              > faculty
              > > > member of the University of Northern Colorado, former Waldorf
              > parent,
              > > > keynote speaker at Waldorf conferences:
              > > >
              > > > I first heard of Waldorf education about five years ago, after
              > > > having carried out extensive study of the neurological aspects of
              > > > cognition, movement, and maturation. I was delighted to discover
              > such
              > > > a neurologically sound curriculum. I heartily support efforts to
              > > > spread the awareness of Waldorf education and hope that it will
              > spawn
              > > > not only an increase in Waldorf schools, but an infusion of at
              > least
              > > > some of the ideas into the mainstream where they are so sorely
              > needed.
              > > > In Colorado, I am working with several districts to incorporate
              > > > various Waldorf strategies into the teaching of reading and
              > > > mathematics. The ideas are very well received and very much
              > needed.
              > > > (Personal statement, 1984)"
              > > >
              > > > 8. "Jane W. Hippolito, Ph D, Professor of English and Adjunct
              > > > Professor of Liberal Studies, California State University,
              > Fullerton:
              > > >
              > > > "For the past ten years my teaching responsibilities have
              > > > compelled me to inform myself not just about what would-be
              > teachers
              > > > need to learn. All of my instructionally related research into
              > > > childhood has pointed toward the superiority of Waldorf education
              > over
              > > > all other current educational methods.""
              > > >
              > > > and (source: http://www.steinercollege.edu/waldorfed.html):
              > > >
              > > > 1. "Programs such as Montessori and the Waldorf Schools offer
              > small
              > > > classes, individualized instruction, and flexible, child-centered
              > > > curricula which can accommodate the child and do not demand that
              > the
              > > > child do all of the accommodating . . . Rudolf Steiner was
              > troubled by
              > > > the overly academic emphasis of schools; he felt that the
              > aesthetic
              > > > side of children was being overlooked and that this should be
              > > > developed along with the intellectual powers. Waldorf schools
              > > > emphasize creativity in all aspects of children's work. The same
              > > > teacher may stay with the same group of children for as many as
              > eight
              > > > grades. In so doing the teacher has to grow and learn with the
              > children.
              > > >
              > > > - Miseducation: Preschoolers at Risk, David Elkind,
              > > > Ph.D., Professor of Child Study, Tufts University Author,
              > > > The Hurried Child, All Grown Up and No Place to Go; Miseducation:
              > > > Preschoolers at Risk"
              > > >
              > > > 2. "American schools are having a crisis in values. Half the
              > children
              > > > fail according to standard measures and the other half wonder why
              > they
              > > > are learning what they do. As is appropriate to life in a
              > democracy,
              > > > there are a handful of alternatives. Among the alternatives, the
              > > > Waldorf school represents a chance for every child to grow and
              > learn
              > > > according to the most natural rhythms of life. For the early
              > school
              > > > child, this means a non-competitive, non-combative environment in
              > > > which the wonders of science and literature fill the day without
              > > > causing anxiety and confusion. For the older child, it offers a
              > > > curriculum that addresses the question of why they are learning. I
              > > > have sent two of my children to Waldorf schools and they have been
              > > > wonderfully well served.
              > > >
              > > > - Raymond McDermott,Ph.D.,
              > > > Professor of Education and Anthropology, Stanford University"
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > Thanks,
              > > >
              > > > Keith
            • pete_karaiskos
              ... It may be that I ran two files together. Pete
              Message 6 of 11 , Jun 3, 2005
              • 0 Attachment
                --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "Linda Clemens"
                <aesopo_aeternus@y...> wrote:
                > Pete, I'm going to give you the benefit of the doubt that you didn't
                > mean to forge Gardner's signature at the end of this. Maybe
                > somebody's been messing with your head.

                It may be that I ran two files together.

                Pete
              • pete_karaiskos
                ... I ll look into the error Linda. I m not as embarassed for me as you are. The fact remains, BTW, that people who make glowing statements about Waldorf
                Message 7 of 11 , Jun 3, 2005
                • 0 Attachment
                  --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "Linda Clemens"
                  <aesopo_aeternus@y...> wrote:
                  > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "pete_karaiskos"
                  > <petekaraiskos@s...> further wrote:
                  > Pete here:
                  > "THIS is exactly why I don't put much stock in superficial observations
                  > of Waldorf education. One has to really look closely to find what is
                  > really going on. Pete"
                  >
                  > He says this after he's posted a blatant, insultingly obvious, forgery
                  > of Howard Gardner.
                  >
                  > [groan]......Pete. I'm embarassed for you.
                  >
                  > Linda

                  I'll look into the error Linda. I'm not as embarassed for me as you
                  are. The fact remains, BTW, that people who make glowing statements
                  about Waldorf almost never have spent time in the trenches of a
                  Waldorf school and are only commenting on the superficial stuff.

                  Pete
                • dottie zold
                  ... That s what happens Pete when you swollow PLANS propaganda machine without checking for the facts. How typical to not let the facts get in the way. Dottie
                  Message 8 of 11 , Jun 3, 2005
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Pete:
                    > I'll look into the error Linda.

                    That's what happens Pete when you swollow PLANS propaganda machine
                    without checking for the facts. How typical to not let the facts get
                    in the way.

                    Dottie
                  • Mike T
                    Well Pete; another lie? Like all those about Steiner you peddle. Zero credibilty to Pete. Zero. Mike T ...
                    Message 9 of 11 , Jun 4, 2005
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Well Pete; another lie? Like all those about Steiner you peddle. Zero
                      credibilty to Pete. Zero.
                      Mike T



                      >From: "Linda Clemens" <aesopo_aeternus@...>
                      >Reply-To: anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com
                      >To: anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com
                      >Subject: [anthroposophy_tomorrow] Re: Let's be sensible on defining
                      >education and how it is transmitted.
                      >Date: Fri, 03 Jun 2005 21:24:40 -0000
                      >
                      >Pete, I'm going to give you the benefit of the doubt that you didn't
                      >mean to forge Gardner's signature at the end of this. Maybe
                      >somebody's been messing with your head.
                      >
                      >****PLANS****** wrote this, not Howard Gardner. I have a hard time
                      >believing this is an innocent mistake, since a KEY identifying
                      >paragraph has been omitted where I put the &&&&. The paragraph that
                      >is missing says:
                      >
                      >"PLANS would like to see Waldorf schools advise parents up front that
                      >the teacher's interactions with their child will be guided by their
                      >belief in karma and reincarnation, which leads some Waldorf teachers
                      >to speculate that a child may have been born to the "wrong" parents,
                      >for instance, or may have been drawn "karmically" to the Waldorf
                      >school even against the parent's wishes. "
                      >
                      >Hmmmm...... This forgery is even clumsier and more poorly executed
                      >than the one that brought down Dan Rather.
                      >
                      >http://www.waldorfcritics.org/active/concerns.html
                      >
                      >PS---You know something funny? I don't think Howard Gardner was ever
                      >a classroom teacher. What the hell is he doing trying to tell
                      >teachers how to teach? [sarcasm].
                      >
                      >Linda
                      >
                      >--- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "pete_karaiskos"
                      ><petekaraiskos@s...> wrote:
                      > > Let's not forget:
                      >
                      > >
                      > > BUT THEN... ONLY A YEAR LATER AND AFTER ACTUALLY RESEARCHING WALDORF
                      > > EDUCATION THE SAME MAN STATES:
                      > >
                      > > [Dr. Howard Gardner, Harvard University professor, via email to
                      >PLANS
                      > > webmaster dated September 5, 2002]
                      > >
                      > > "On rare occasions a leader in the Waldorf movement has called for
                      > > full disclosure to parents concerning the Anthroposophic basis of
                      >the
                      > > schools. Eugene Schwartz, a respected Waldorf master teacher and
                      > > former director of teacher training at Sunbridge College in Spring
                      > > Valley, New York, says, in a lecture at Sunbridge, November 13,
                      >1999,
                      > > regarding his own daughter's experience in Waldorf: "I'm glad my
                      > > daughter gets to speak about God every morning: that's why I send
                      >her
                      > > to a Waldorf school . . . I send my daughter to a Waldorf school so
                      > > that she can have a religious experience . . . when we deny that
                      > > Waldorf schools are giving children religious experiences, we are
                      > > denying the basis of Waldorf education . . . The time has come for
                      >us
                      > > to stop pussyfooting around [theories] that will sound too strange
                      >if
                      > > we tell parents what we are really doing . . . Tell everybody what
                      >we
                      > > are about. The day they walk into the school, let them know...it is
                      > > our responsibility to share with the parents those elements of
                      > > Anthroposophy which will help them understand their children and
                      > > fathom the mysterious ways in which we work. Yes, we are giving the
                      > > children a version of Anthroposophy in the classroom; whether we
                      >mean
                      > > to or not, it's there." Schwartz was replaced as director of teacher
                      > > training at Sunbridge shortly after making these public remarks.
                      > > Perhaps other Waldorf leaders are not ready for this level of
                      >openness.
                      > >
                      > > A more typical attitude, disdainful of parents who question what
                      >their
                      > > children are being exposed to, is expressed by Roy Wilkinson, who
                      >has
                      > > been involved with Waldorf and Anthroposophy for over 60 years,
                      >first
                      > > as a student, then as a teacher, lecturer and writer: "It has been
                      > > known for parents to say that they like the school, but wish it were
                      > > divorced from certain 'crazy' ideas which they may have garnered, or
                      > > which a teacher may have expressed. The Waldorf school and
                      >the 'crazy'
                      > > ideas are, however, inseparable. Waldorf schools would not exist if
                      > > they were not related to these ideas." (Roy Wilkinson, "The
                      >Spiritual
                      > > Basis of Steiner Education: The Waldorf School Approach," Sophia
                      > > Books, Rudolf Steiner Press, 1996.)
                      > >
                      >
                      >&&&&&&&
                      > > Parents should be told that the science and history curriculum will
                      >be
                      > > based on Steiner's reading of the "Akashic Record," according to
                      >which
                      > > the "ancients" had clairvoyant powers which Anthroposophic
                      >initiation
                      > > may help students attain some day. They should be told that loyal
                      > > Steiner followers believe humans once lived on the lost continent of
                      > > Atlantis and will one day live on Venus, Jupiter, and Vulcan. They
                      > > should be told that teachers study a medieval scheme in which race,
                      > > blood, and the "four temperaments" will help them understand their
                      > > students' development. Not all Waldorf teachers believe the "wacky"
                      > > things Steiner said, but many are deeply involved in Steiner study
                      > > (faculty meetings generally include a Steiner study session).
                      >Teachers
                      > > typically do not discuss Anthroposophy with parents."
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Pete here:
                      > > THIS is exactly why I don't put much stock in superficial
                      >observations
                      > > of Waldorf education. One has to really look closely to find what
                      >is
                      > > really going on.
                      > >
                      > > Pete
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "kmlightseeker"
                      > > <kmlightseeker@y...> wrote:
                      > > > I think we have to realise the fluidity of approaches and
                      >pathways and
                      > > > participation in the education area:
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > (i)
                      > > >
                      > > > "Main Entry: ed�u�ca�tor
                      > > > Pronunciation: 'e-j&-"kA-t&r
                      > > > Function: noun
                      > > > 1 : one skilled in teaching : TEACHER
                      > > > 2 a : a student of the theory and practice of education :
                      >EDUCATIONIST
                      > > > 2 b : an administrator in education"
                      > > >
                      > > > (source: Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary
                      > > > < http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?
                      >book=Dictionary&va=educator >)
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > (ii)
                      > > >
                      > > > "In education, teachers are those who teach students or pupils,
                      >often
                      > > > a course of study or a practical skill, including learning and
                      > > > thinking skills. There are many different ways to teach and help
                      > > > students learn. This is often refered to as the teacher's
                      >pedagogy.
                      > > > When deciding what teaching method to use, a teacher will need to
                      > > > consider students' background knowledge, environment, and their
                      > > > learning goals."
                      > > >
                      > > > (source: "Teacher" < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Educationalist >
                      > > > [accessed 4th June 2005])
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > (iii)
                      > > >
                      > > > "Challenges in education
                      > > >
                      > > > The goal of education is the transference of ideas from one
                      >person to
                      > > > another, or from one person to a group. Can a group of people
                      >educate?
                      > > > Problems with the current public education sytem include: the
                      >method
                      > > > of knowledge delivery, how to determine what knowledge should be
                      > > > taught, the use and relevancy of the imparted knowledge, and how
                      >well
                      > > > the pupil will retain incoming knowledge.
                      > > >
                      > > > In addition to the ability to the "Three R's", reading, writing,
                      >and
                      > > > 'rithmetic, Western primary and secondary schools attempt to
                      >teach the
                      > > > basic principles of history, mathematics, including calculus and
                      > > > algebra, physics, chemistry, and sometimes politics, in the hope
                      >that
                      > > > students will retain and use this knowledge as they age. The
                      >current
                      > > > education system measures competency with tests and assignments
                      >and
                      > > > then assigns each student a corresponding grade. The grades
                      >usually
                      > > > come in the form of either a letter grade or a percentage, which
                      > > > ideally represents the amount of all material presented in class
                      >that
                      > > > the student understood. These grades do not reveal the strengths
                      >and
                      > > > weaknesses of a student. Many feel this grading scheme risks
                      >lowering
                      > > > students self-esteem and self-confidence, as students may receive
                      >poor
                      > > > marks for reasons unrelated to their level of intellegence or
                      > > > capability, for example poverty, abuse, lack of interest in the
                      > > > material, prejudiced or incompetent teachers, uncomfortable
                      > > > classrooms, etc.
                      > > >
                      > > > Albert Einstein, one of the most famous physicist of our time,
                      > > > credited with helping us understand the universe better, was not a
                      > > > model school student. He was uninterested in what was being
                      >taught,
                      > > > and he did not attend classes all the time. However, his gifts
                      > > > eventually shone through and added to the sum of human knowledge.
                      > > >
                      > > > Every child has certain gifts and abilities, but early and later
                      > > > childhood education rarely tries to find out what that may be and
                      >help
                      > > > the students develop that. If children are good at something they
                      >will
                      > > > excel in that subject, and if they do not, they may not do as
                      >well.
                      > > >
                      > > > This brings us to a major critique of modern western education. It
                      > > > exposes children to a wide variety of disciplines which is good,
                      >but
                      > > > subjects are taught, tested, and then the children are generally
                      >not
                      > > > required to remember the content from before. Time is always
                      >spent in
                      > > > mathematics classes reteaching students the basic concepts they
                      >should
                      > > > know from the year before, because students have forgotten most
                      >of it.
                      > > >
                      > > > There are also some dilemas about the teaching of knowledge.
                      >Should
                      > > > some knowledge be forgotten? What should be taught, are we better
                      >off
                      > > > knowing how to build nuclear bombs, or is it best to let such
                      > > > knowledge be forgotten?"
                      > > >
                      > > > (source: "Education" <
                      > > >
                      > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Educator#Recent_world-
                      >wide_educational_trends
                      > > > > [accessed 4th June 2005])
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > - Here are some educators (go down to "Editorial", and click on
                      >the
                      > > > coloured names to see the individual's bios), and their
                      >qualifications
                      > > > and experiences all differ: some are theorists, others have a more
                      > > > direct experience - in the main, they are academics or lecturers:
                      > > >
                      > > > source: http://www.infed.org/about_us.htm
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > - "When attempting to assist a weak, struggling or ineffective
                      > > > teacher, one often notes that the teacher has no established
                      > > > philosophy of education; no roots, no belief system, no standard
                      >upon
                      > > > which she is able to base her policies and practices in the
                      >classroom.
                      > > > She embraces every new technique as her own and tends to define
                      > > > progress as adopting what is new because it is new; abandoning
                      >what is
                      > > > old because it is old. Conversely, the talented and effective
                      >educator
                      > > > seems to base her every action upon the firm foundation of an
                      > > > established philosophy or belief system. Her strength flows from
                      >that
                      > > > philosophy and she accepts or rejects materials or practices based
                      > > > upon their compatibility with her established philosophical
                      >concepts.
                      > > > This belief system has developed over time and has been adapted,
                      > > > modified and molded by the colleagues and clients that she has
                      > > > interacted with throughout her career.
                      > > >
                      > > > Little is done in our teacher training institutions to encourage
                      >the
                      > > > young professional to develop or examine her own educational
                      > > > philosophy. Administrators sometimes ask for the applicant's
                      > > > educational philosophy in an initial job interview, but the
                      > > > prospective teacher is seldom required to defend these beliefs
                      >with
                      > > > theoretical or pragmatic evidence."
                      > > >
                      > > > (source: "Developing An Educational Philosophy: If You Don't
                      >Stand Up
                      > > > for Something, You'll Fall for Almost Anything"
                      > > > < http://www.ricklavoie.com/philosophy.html > [accessed 4th June
                      >2005])
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > - What some educators have been saying about Waldorf Education
                      > > > (source: http://www.waldorfanswers.org/WaldorfComments.htm):
                      > > >
                      > > > 1. "Ernest L Boyer (1928-1995), Former President, Carnegie
                      >Foundation
                      > > > for the Advancement of Teaching:
                      > > >
                      > > > "Those in the public school reform movement have some important
                      > > > things to learn from what Waldorf educators have been doing for
                      >many
                      > > > years. It is an enormously impressive effort toward quality
                      >education,
                      > > > and schools would be advised to familiarize themselves with the
                      >basic
                      > > > assumptions that undergird the Waldorf movement. Art as it helps
                      >to
                      > > > reveal the use of language, art as it can be revealed in numbers,
                      >and
                      > > > certainly in nature""
                      > > >
                      > > > 2. "Thomas Armstrong, Ph D, Author: "In Their Own Way.
                      >Discovering and
                      > > > Encouraging Your Child's Personal Learning Style":
                      > > >
                      > > > "Cultural literacy is the key concern throughout a Waldorf
                      > > > program, and here Waldorf educators are also in accord with other
                      > > > experts in their field. Apparently many parents are discovering
                      >that
                      > > > Waldorf fills a need for a creative, artistic approach to learning
                      > > > that is hard to find elsewhere."
                      > > > (Parenting Magazine, August 1988)"
                      > > >
                      > > > 3. "Konrad Oberhuber, world leading expert on Raphael, former
                      >Director
                      > > > of the Museum of Art Albertina in Vienna, former Professor of Fine
                      > > > Arts, Harvard University, now at International Christian
                      >University,
                      > > > Mitaka, Tokyo:
                      > > >
                      > > > "No other educational system in the world gives such a central
                      > > > role to the arts as the Waldorf school movement. Even mathematics
                      >is
                      > > > presented in an artistic fashion and related via dance, movement
                      >or
                      > > > drawing, to the child as a whole. Anything that can be done to
                      >further
                      > > > these revolutionary educational ideas will be of the greatest
                      > > > importance.""
                      > > >
                      > > > 4. "Douglas Sloan, Ph D, Professor of Education, Teachers College,
                      > > > Columbia University:
                      > > >
                      > > > "Based on a comprehensive, integrated understanding of the human
                      > > > being, a detailed account of child development, and with a
                      >curriculum
                      > > > and teaching practice that seeks unity of intellectual, emotional
                      >and
                      > > > ethical development at every point, Waldorf education deserves the
                      > > > attention of all concerned with education and the human future.""
                      > > >
                      > > > 5. "Jack Miller, Professor, Coordinator of Holistic and Aesthetic
                      > > > Education in the Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning
                      >at
                      > > > the University of Toronto:
                      > > >
                      > > > "Waldorf education has been an important model of holistic
                      > > > education for almost a century. It is one of the very few forms of
                      > > > education that acknowledges the soul-life of children and nurtures
                      > > > that life. It is truly an education for the whole child and will
                      > > > continue to be an important model of education as we move into the
                      > > > 21st century."
                      > > > (Personal statement 14 July, 2002)"
                      > > >
                      > > > 6. "Paul Bayers, (earlier) Professor at Columbia Teachers'
                      >College:
                      > > >
                      > > > "The importance of storytelling, of the natural rhythms of daily
                      > > > life, of the evolutionary changes in the child, of art as the
                      > > > necessary underpinning of learning, and of the aesthetic
                      >environment
                      > > > as a whole - all basic to Waldorf education for the past 70
                      >years -
                      > > > are being "discovered" and verified by researchers unconnected to
                      >the
                      > > > Waldorf movement.""
                      > > >
                      > > > 7. "Dee Joy Coulter, Ed.D., Instructor of Neurology and Learning,
                      >and
                      > > > core faculty member at Naropa University, Colorado, adjunct
                      >faculty
                      > > > member of the University of Northern Colorado, former Waldorf
                      >parent,
                      > > > keynote speaker at Waldorf conferences:
                      > > >
                      > > > I first heard of Waldorf education about five years ago, after
                      > > > having carried out extensive study of the neurological aspects of
                      > > > cognition, movement, and maturation. I was delighted to discover
                      >such
                      > > > a neurologically sound curriculum. I heartily support efforts to
                      > > > spread the awareness of Waldorf education and hope that it will
                      >spawn
                      > > > not only an increase in Waldorf schools, but an infusion of at
                      >least
                      > > > some of the ideas into the mainstream where they are so sorely
                      >needed.
                      > > > In Colorado, I am working with several districts to incorporate
                      > > > various Waldorf strategies into the teaching of reading and
                      > > > mathematics. The ideas are very well received and very much
                      >needed.
                      > > > (Personal statement, 1984)"
                      > > >
                      > > > 8. "Jane W. Hippolito, Ph D, Professor of English and Adjunct
                      > > > Professor of Liberal Studies, California State University,
                      >Fullerton:
                      > > >
                      > > > "For the past ten years my teaching responsibilities have
                      > > > compelled me to inform myself not just about what would-be
                      >teachers
                      > > > need to learn. All of my instructionally related research into
                      > > > childhood has pointed toward the superiority of Waldorf education
                      >over
                      > > > all other current educational methods.""
                      > > >
                      > > > and (source: http://www.steinercollege.edu/waldorfed.html):
                      > > >
                      > > > 1. "Programs such as Montessori and the Waldorf Schools offer
                      >small
                      > > > classes, individualized instruction, and flexible, child-centered
                      > > > curricula which can accommodate the child and do not demand that
                      >the
                      > > > child do all of the accommodating . . . Rudolf Steiner was
                      >troubled by
                      > > > the overly academic emphasis of schools; he felt that the
                      >aesthetic
                      > > > side of children was being overlooked and that this should be
                      > > > developed along with the intellectual powers. Waldorf schools
                      > > > emphasize creativity in all aspects of children's work. The same
                      > > > teacher may stay with the same group of children for as many as
                      >eight
                      > > > grades. In so doing the teacher has to grow and learn with the
                      >children.
                      > > >
                      > > > - Miseducation: Preschoolers at Risk, David Elkind,
                      > > > Ph.D., Professor of Child Study, Tufts University Author,
                      > > > The Hurried Child, All Grown Up and No Place to Go; Miseducation:
                      > > > Preschoolers at Risk"
                      > > >
                      > > > 2. "American schools are having a crisis in values. Half the
                      >children
                      > > > fail according to standard measures and the other half wonder why
                      >they
                      > > > are learning what they do. As is appropriate to life in a
                      >democracy,
                      > > > there are a handful of alternatives. Among the alternatives, the
                      > > > Waldorf school represents a chance for every child to grow and
                      >learn
                      > > > according to the most natural rhythms of life. For the early
                      >school
                      > > > child, this means a non-competitive, non-combative environment in
                      > > > which the wonders of science and literature fill the day without
                      > > > causing anxiety and confusion. For the older child, it offers a
                      > > > curriculum that addresses the question of why they are learning. I
                      > > > have sent two of my children to Waldorf schools and they have been
                      > > > wonderfully well served.
                      > > >
                      > > > - Raymond McDermott,Ph.D.,
                      > > > Professor of Education and Anthropology, Stanford University"
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > Thanks,
                      > > >
                      > > > Keith
                      >
                      >

                      _________________________________________________________________
                      Free wallpapers on Level 9 http://level9.ninemsn.com.au/default.aspx
                    • kmlightseeker
                      Hi Dottie, Yes, I wouldn t mind doing that. I will see what is possible and I ll update the group as to the results of that process of getting information
                      Message 10 of 11 , Jun 4, 2005
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                        Hi Dottie,


                        Yes, I wouldn't mind doing that. I will see what is possible and I'll
                        update the group as to the results of that process of getting
                        information together on an educational ideas/views and WE comparison.

                        Thanks, Dottie.


                        Keith


                        --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, Dottie wrote:
                        > Hey Keith,
                        >
                        > Would you consider creating a WE information page specifically on the
                        > things you are finding such as the information below. I think it
                        > would be wonderful but if you do not have the time maybe you can put
                        > a file here on list that can be accessed for those wishing to recall
                        > these wonderful bits of information that exists pertaining to WE.
                        >
                        > All good things,
                        > Dottie
                        > [Keith:]
                        > > I think we have to realise the fluidity of approaches and pathways
                        > and
                        > > participation in the education area:
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > (i)
                        > >
                        > > "Main Entry: ed·u·ca·tor
                        > > Pronunciation: 'e-j&-"kA-t&r
                        > > Function: noun
                        > > 1 : one skilled in teaching : TEACHER
                        > > 2 a : a student of the theory and practice of education :
                        > EDUCATIONIST
                        > > 2 b : an administrator in education"
                        > >
                        > > (source: Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary
                        > > < http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=educator
                        > >)
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > (ii)
                        > >
                        > > "In education, teachers are those who teach students or pupils,
                        > often
                        > > a course of study or a practical skill, including learning and
                        > > thinking skills. There are many different ways to teach and help

                        <snip>
                      • pete_karaiskos
                        ... I would never jeopardize my integrity with a stupid idea like that. Pete
                        Message 11 of 11 , Jun 4, 2005
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                          --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "Frank Thomas Smith"
                          <franksmith@v...> wrote:
                          >
                          > > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "Linda Clemens"
                          > > <.> wrote:
                          > > > Pete, I'm going to give you the benefit of the doubt that you didn't
                          > > > mean to forge Gardner's signature at the end of this. Maybe
                          > > > somebody's been messing with your head.
                          > >
                          > > It may be that I ran two files together.
                          > >
                          > > Pete
                          > >
                          > Since we're using the conditional, it may also be that you thought you
                          > wouldn't get caught doing so.
                          >
                          > Frank

                          I would never jeopardize my integrity with a stupid idea like that.

                          Pete
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