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48999Re: Once Upon A Time...

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  • ted.wrinch
    Jan 3, 2012
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      Hah - well. that makes it a bit easier for you: :).

      T.

      Ted Wrinch

      --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "jmn36210" <jmn36210@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > Ted, I believe you mean that the English translation I used
      > is excellent. I merely introduced a few modifications and
      > variations of mine :-)
      >
      > http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/perrault02.html
      > <http://www.pitt.edu/%7Edash/perrault02.html>
      >
      >
      >
      > Jean-Marc
      >
      >
      >
      > ==============================================================
      > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "ted.wrinch"
      > <ted.wrinch@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Tres bien, Jean-Marc!
      > >
      > > In a posting on WC, circa '06 - so long ago now! - you apologised for
      > your 'poor English'. From what I've seen your English has always been
      > good and is excellent in this piece!
      > >
      > > You labelled Walden as having 'AIDS' - acquired intellectual
      > deficiency syndrome - in a later posting on WC. An accurate description
      > and many have said equivalent in other words. A question that arises is
      > what he's doing on the list. He doesn't know much about Steiner or
      > spirituality (Charlotte gently rebuked him on the latter, which he
      > didn't notice) or much else he comments on, beyond sport. He claims to
      > be there to learn, but appears to have learnt little in the half decade
      > of the list's existence.
      > >
      > > I've wondered why some of the others are there too - for some, like
      > Pete K and Roger, it's pretty obvious that they are there because they
      > have hatreds to express. Diana, who seems to have little to contribute,
      > is a strange case. We know she's an editor and so spends her day working
      > with the word. This can be a labour of love for those that enjoy helping
      > talented people express their potential, but it can also be a
      > frustrating, narrow activity that cramps one's own creativity and makes
      > one feel smaller than those one serves. My guess is that Diana suffers
      > from the latter; this could explain her need to emulate Der Staudi's
      > style of argument and mocking academic superiority. But this is really a
      > waste of her time and what she ought to do is to find a creative outlet
      > for her energies. Her last post showed a degree of mental unbalance (the
      > section on my censoring by Der Staudi was quite unhinged) which suggests
      > that that list isn't a healthy place for her; from an anthro POV, it
      > looks like her luciferic double is getting the better of her.
      > >
      > > It's always been apparent to me that Dugan suffers from scientism and
      > is there mainly to attack the science.
      > >
      > > Der Staudi's main reason for being there appears to be because
      > 3-folding provides a competitor vision of social reformation to his own.
      > But, perhaps subconsciously, he knows that his own isn't viable
      > (capitalism will never be replaced) and so he figures that it's best to
      > try and attack Steiner intellectually.
      > >
      > > I also came across again the infamous (to me) Der Staudi posting on
      > Ostwald, Steiner and materialism from 4.5 years ago, where he makes the
      > lazily polemical claim that Steiner's understanding of materialism was
      > 'inconsistent' (message 393). The basis of his claim was his fatally
      > compromised statement:
      > >
      > > "Steiner proudly points to Ostwald as a prominent scientist who called
      > for overcoming materialism. In these contexts, Ostwald
      > > appears as a kind of pioneer of anti-materialism from within the
      > scientific establishment, one whom Steiner gladly invokes to endorse
      > Steiner's own
      > > favored views."
      > >
      > > He never successfully defended this formulation in his debate with me
      > and instead ended up showing that he had no coherent conception of what
      > materialism is at all. It was interesting to me to see how inexperienced
      > I was at debating back then (my first discussion group) and rusty at
      > expressing myself - I had been working in a technical milleu for for 20
      > years.
      > >
      > > In the light of this philosophical naiveté, it wasn't surprising to
      > see Der Staudi claiming that Steiner's PoF and TaS were 'typical
      > examples of C19 German Idealism', in his debate with you in the '06
      > debate, whilst failing to understand in what ways both works transcended
      > this formula. Once one sees through Der Staudi's thick fog of polemic
      > and logical fallacies, and also checks one's own facts and
      > understanding, it becomes much easier to see him for what he is - a
      > retailer of the conventions and commonplaces of the age.
      > >
      > > T.
      > >
      > > Ted Wrinch
      > >
      > > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, "jmn36210" jmn36210@
      > wrote:
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Once upon a time, there lived in a certain Norwegian village
      > > > a mischievous and turbulent little boy, so enamoured with
      > Scandinavian
      > > > folklore and French fairy tales that he had a little red riding hood
      > > > made for him. It suited him so extremely well that everybody called
      > > > him Little Red Hiding Hood.
      > > >
      > > > One day his mother, having made some cakes, said to him, "Go, my
      > dear,
      > > > and see how your grandmother is doing, for I hear she has been very
      > > > ill. Take her a cake, and this little pot of (peanut) butter."
      > > >
      > > > Little Red Hiding Hood put on his snowshoes and set out immediately
      > > > to go to his grandmother, who lived in another village.
      > > >
      > > > As he was going through the wood, he met with a wolf, who had a very
      > > > great mind to eat him up, but he dared not, because of the many
      > > > surveillance cameras in the forest. He asked him where he was going.
      > > > The clever child, though he knew perfectly well that it was
      > dangerous
      > > > to talk to a wolf, said to him,"I am going to see Grandma Sophia and
      > > > carry her a cake and a little pot of peanut butter from my mother."
      > > >
      > > > "Peanut butter? You're putting me on!" the wolf exclaimed,
      > > > "Look, Little Red Riding Hood, I happen to be an authority on all
      > > > sorts of 'fables convenues' and there is no bibliographical evidence
      > > > whatsoever to support the historicity of this er...scandalous
      > > > Americanized version of Charles Perrault's wonderful text."
      > > >
      > > > "Something very wrong is going on here...", said Dr Wolf to himself
      > > > perplexedly,"how can young LRRH speak American so well in this neck
      > > > of the woods, anyways?..."
      > > > As if he had been hit by a giant snowball, Dr Wolf suddenly realized
      > > > that his interlocutor was Little Red Hiding Hood, the mischievous
      > > > and turbulent little Tarjei - trolling as Little Red Riding Hood!
      > > >
      > > > "Does Grandma Sophia live far off? said the wolf.
      > > >
      > > > "Oh I say," answered Little Red Riding Hood; "it is beyond that mill
      > > > you see there, at the first house in the village."
      > > >
      > > > "Well," said the wolf, "and I'll go and see her too. I'll go this
      > way
      > > > and go you that, and we shall see who will be there first."
      > > >
      > > > The wolf ran as fast as he could, taking the shortest path, and the
      > > > little boy took a roundabout way, entertaining himself by gathering
      > > > nuts, running after butterflies, and gathering bouquets of little
      > > > flowers. It was not long before the wolf arrived at the old woman's
      > > > house. He knocked at the door: tap, tap.
      > > >
      > > > "Who' there?"
      > > >
      > > > "Your grandchild, Little Red Riding Hood," replied the wolf,
      > > > counterfeiting his voice; "who has brought you a cake and a little
      > pot
      > > > of peanut butter sent you by mother."
      > > >
      > > > The good grandmother, who was in bed, because she was somewhat ill,
      > > > cried out, "Pull the bobbin, and the latch will go up."
      > > >
      > > > The wolf pulled the bobbin, and the door opened, and then he
      > immediately
      > > > fell upon the good woman and ate her up in a moment, for it been
      > more
      > > > than three days since he had eaten. He then shut the door and got
      > into
      > > > the grandmother's bed, expecting Little Red Riding Hood, who came
      > some
      > > > time afterwards and knocked at the door: tap, tap.
      > > >
      > > > "Who's there?"
      > > >
      > > > Little Red Riding Hood, hearing the big voice of the wolf, was not
      > > > afraid at all, and answered, "It is your grandchild Little Red
      > Riding
      > > > Hood, who has brought you a cake and a little pot of peanut butter
      > > > mother sends you."
      > > >
      > > > The wolf cried out to him, softening his voice as much as he could,
      > > > "Pull the bobbin, and the latch will go up."
      > > >
      > > > Little Red Riding Hood pulled the bobbin, and the door opened.
      > > >
      > > > The wolf, seeing him come in, said to him, hiding himself under the
      > > > bedclothes, "Put the cake and the little pot of peanut butter upon
      > > > the stool, and come get into bed with me."
      > > >
      > > > Little Red Riding Hood took off his clothes and got into bed.
      > > > He was greatly amazed to see how his grandmother looked in her
      > > > nightclothes, and said to her, "Grandmother, what big arms you
      > have!"
      > > >
      > > > "All the better to hug you with, my dear."
      > > >
      > > > "Grandmother, what big legs you have!"
      > > >
      > > > "All the better to run with, my child."
      > > >
      > > > "Grandmother, what big ears you have!"
      > > >
      > > > "All the better to hear with, my child."
      > > >
      > > > "Grandmother, what big eyes you have!"
      > > >
      > > > "All the better to see with, my child."
      > > >
      > > > "Grandmother, what big teeth you have got!"
      > > >
      > > > "All the better to eat you up with."
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > And, saying these words, this wicked wolf turned "green as a
      > canker",
      > > > and passed away - with its eyes rolled upwards.
      > > > The cadaver and the stench disappeared instantly.
      > > > Grandma Sophia reappeared with her gentle smile, saying "Little Red
      > > > Riding Hood, would you please bring the cake and this little pot of
      > > > peanut butter?..."
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Moral: Warning! Anthroposophia can be hazardous to your health!
      > > >
      > > > Do not consume what you are not sincerely willing to truly digest
      > > > and humbly assimilate.
      > > > Beware, this celestial bread will act as a poison in the souls of
      > > > its profaners...
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Very weirdly,
      > > >
      > > > Jean-Marc
      > > >
      > >
      >
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