Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

41731Re: [anthroposophy_tomorrow] Re: Islam and Anthroposophy: An approach.

Expand Messages
  • dottie zold
    Sep 3, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Hey Taz,
       
      Thanks for the link I will check it out as I seem to think Islam is misunderstood vversus Arabism..to me Muslums as all the other various religions, stick to a fundamental principle that puts their God and way above the others.
       
      It is my experience that Sufism just as true Christianity and Buddhism predates any of their hardened forms that we know today. People want to seperate Christ from Christanity but you can't although if we used the same criteria in what you share below we could...its obvious that Christ predated Christianity. Sufism is to Islam what esoteric Christianity is to Christianity and Kaballah is to Judiasm...all of these speak of higher beings working with man for his further enlightment within their own traditions they are born into....if they can find them.
       
      All good things,
      Dottie

      "If there is something more powerful than destiny, this must be the human being who bears destiny unshaken." Rudolf Steiner

      --- On Thu, 9/3/09, elfuncle <coolvibes@...> wrote:

      From: elfuncle <coolvibes@...>
      Subject: [anthroposophy_tomorrow] Re: Islam and Anthroposophy: An approach.
      To: anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Thursday, September 3, 2009, 6:41 AM

      Sufism would be outside the scope of this as long as it's an esoteric system beyond the context of fatalistic monotheism, or arabism according to Rudolf Steiner.

      Wikipedia:
      "According to some modern proponents, such as Idries Shah, the Sufi philosophy is universal in nature, its roots predating the arising of Islam and the other modern-day religions; likewise, some Muslims feel that Sufism is outside the sphere of Islam, although some scholars of Islam contend that it is simply the name for the inner or esoteric dimension of Islam."

      I'm not participating in discussions these days, only highlighting some of Rudolf Steiner's key points, and clearing up misunderstandings if called for. Keep in mind that words change their meaning over time, not only during the course of centuries but even from decade to decade.

      In this fascinating lecture, given in Dornach one year before his death, Rudolf Steiner speaks about the origins and history of Islam. He also reveals US President Woodrow Wilson as the individuality who lived as Muavija in the 7th century, a successor of the Prophet Mohammed -- a key element towards an understanding of the Arabic stream in the West, especially how this comes to expression in politics at the present time.

      http://wn.rsarchive.org/Lectures/KarmRelI/19240316p01.html

      Tarjei


      --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, dottie zold <dottie_z@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Tarjei, I am wondering what you think about Sufism? This is the inner tradition of Islam. I think it is has to be as compatible as Budhism is to Christianity as well. Same with the inner tradition of Hinduism as brought forth by Paramahansa Yogananda in the 20s. *I think the inner traditions of each religion are probably very connected to Christ in all ways. I THINK
      >  
      > For me the bigger issues seems to be Arabism...even my Muslum friend Mark who is in the midst of Ramadan right now does not like that term at all.
      >  
      > All good things,
      > Dottie
      >
      > "If there is something more powerful than destiny, this must be the human being who bears destiny unshaken." Rudolf Steiner
      >
      > --- On Wed, 9/2/09, elfuncle <coolvibes@....> wrote:
      >
      >
      > From: elfuncle <coolvibes@...>
      > Subject: [anthroposophy_tomorrow] Re: Islam and Anthroposophy: An approach.
      > To: anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com
      > Date: Wednesday, September 2, 2009, 9:47 AM
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com, dottie zold <dottie_z@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hi Tarjie,
      > >  
      > > I am reading your article as we have had our conversations back and forth regarding Islam. I am up to the place where we have the first 'Love and its meaning in the World' quote and I wonder if you or anyone else can answer me 'what is it that man had  possessed and was withdrawn from him'?
      > >  
      > > "Lucifer's influence brought into humanity a certain element in consequence of which something that man had previously possessed was withdrawn from him. This new element led to a descent, a descent countered by the Mystery of Golgotha which made possible the payment of all debts. The Impulse of Golgotha was not given in order that the sins we have committed in evolution may be removed from us, but in order that what crept into humanity through Lucifer should be given its counterweight."
      > >
      > > I know this is not your point but it was something that hit me while I was reading your thoughts on Islam. I don't understand though your comment that the 'above' quotes on Love and its meaning in the World' show clearly the difference between Islam and Christianity.
      >
      > The quote in question, as a whole, is a refutation of monotheism, it reveals that the idea of an all-knowing-all-powerful supreme being is not only illogical but also a denial of human freedom. In so far as orthodox Christianity is really Islam in disguise, whatever differences there may be are unimportant, but esoteric Christianity that takes humanism and monism as its central point of departure is completely and irrevocably incompatible with any monotheistic system, including Islam, Judaism, and fundamentalist Christianity. On the other hand, esoteric Christianity is perfectly compatible with Buddhism, which will properly understood only in the future.
      >
      > Tarjei
      >




      ------------------------------------

      Yahoo! Groups Links

      <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/anthroposophy_tomorrow/

      <*> Your email settings:
          Individual Email | Traditional

      <*> To change settings online go to:
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/anthroposophy_tomorrow/join
          (Yahoo! ID required)

      <*> To change settings via email:
          mailto:anthroposophy_tomorrow-digest@yahoogroups.com
          mailto:anthroposophy_tomorrow-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com

      <*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          anthroposophy_tomorrow-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

      <*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
          http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


    • Show all 18 messages in this topic