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Silicon-Chip-Shipwreck

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  • starbirdgarden
    Following the adventures of various ships in the past weeks, we inevitab= ly come to the defining moment of shipwreck. We have seen the world through the
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 31, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      Following the adventures of various ships in the past weeks, we inevitab=
      ly come to
      the defining moment of shipwreck. We have seen the world through the Glitt=
      ering
      Eye of the ice-bound shipwrecked Mariner, who, as he must, seeks to awaken =
      others
      to the truth of their position as passive life-tourists, dreamily enjoying =
      the comfort
      and luxury of a deckchair on the Titanic, heading for the Iceberg of Ahrima=
      n.
      The shipwreck is a threshold experience,totally transformative, a pass=
      ing through
      an horizon portal that lies in the nowhere-everywhere land between air and =
      water,
      light and life and death. To become the salt of the earth one must plunge i=
      nto the
      salt-SEE.
      Shipwreck is an initiation of pure grace, a moment of utter aloneness =
      upon infinite
      depths, in terror, nakedness and bereft of all weighty possessions that sin=
      k beneath
      the waves, leaving only what is buoyant, levity born, truly human, to float=
      . The
      situation is grave, but graves belong to gravity - necessary indeed to expe=
      rience the
      ego in the red blood cells, but also necessary -vital - are the restored `t=
      ree of life'
      ethers that lift and bear aloft. The sickness is not unto death! Coleridge=
      's Mariner is
      marooned rather than utterly shipwrecked, but the analogy holds good. `All=
      the
      mountains and Islands were moved out of their places' the island of the eg=
      o is very
      lonely. As is a stranded ship. The Lesser Guardian stands aside. A wonderfu=
      l
      imagination of the shipwreck-initiation is to be found in Marie Corelli's b=
      ook "The
      Sorrows of Satan" which follows the adventures of a writer and his relation=
      ship to
      Lucio-Rimanez (Lucifer-Ahriman) who (as someone else once sang) `introduce=
      s
      himself as a man of wealth and taste' and mysteriously befriends a struggli=
      ng writer,
      making him fabulously rich , opening every worldly door, ensuring fame and =

      recognition, satisfying every desire, just barely incognito, always hoping =
      to be
      recognised and resisted and therefore redeemed. If he wins he loses, and s=
      o hates
      and despises every soul who cannot resist his temptations.
      The descent into atomic materialism and decadence and it's destructiv=
      e effect
      upon society is explored in detail, the man shown as symptom of the greater=
      malady,
      a hermetic connection always clearly drawn. The shipwreck is the culminati=
      on of his
      adventuring in the godless world of science, wealth and celebrity, eyes res=
      olutely
      closed, aboard Lucio's yacht, `Flame' a vessel mysteriously powered by elec=
      tricity. The
      prototype of the Silicon-chip ship? Demons and spectres are crew and also u=
      nwanted
      companions. When for the first time, Lucifer Ahriman is unveiled, the seasc=
      ape turns
      to ice, a frozen world stretches everywhere around. The Flame-yacht of Lu=
      cifer
      steers through the Ahrimanic ice, through an infernal horror of desperately=
      suffering
      souls. A question is asked - whom is to be served? A choice must be made.=


      " The question thundered in my ears……shuddering, I looked from right t=
      o left,
      and saw a gathering crowd of faces, white, wistful, wondering, threatening =
      and
      imploring. – they pressed about me close, with glistening eyes and lips tha=
      t moved
      dumbly. And as they stared upon me I beheld another spectral thing – the im=
      age of
      Myself! - a poor frail creature, pitiful, ignorant, and undiscerning – lim=
      ited in both
      capacity and intelligence, yet full of a strange egotism and still stranger=
      arrogance;
      every detail of my life was suddenly presented to me in a magic mirror, and=
      I read my
      own chronicle of paltry intellectual pride, vulgar ambition, and vulgarer o=
      stentation – I
      realized with shame my miserable vices, my puny scorn of God, my effronteri=
      es and
      blasphemies; and in the sudden strong repulsion and repudiation of my own
      worthless existence, being and character, I found both voice and speech. `=
      God only!'
      I cried fervently – `Annihilation at His hands, rather than life without Hi=
      m! God only! I
      have chosen!" end quote

      Throughout this whole terrible experience a bird yet sings; a heavenly=
      soul song.
      The bird song theme is present throughout the book, a woman author characte=
      r
      whose spiritual books are castigated by modern society is named Mavis – mea=
      ning
      thrush, and the birdsong of hope is ever present, heard here and there in s=
      natches
      and stray notes. Birdsong was not underestimated in novels of this period (=
      1895)
      Feed the birds, dear friends! Feed the birds! Birdsong is more than =
      creative
      modulation of etheric forces, star mediated flower shaping sound. Birdsong=
      is
      individually spiritually potent, the pied Piper of the Soul, calling from t=
      he future, while
      stirring remembrances of past spirit-stature. Birdsong, we are told, is pu=
      rely
      territorial. One wonders why the birds are especially territorial in the ea=
      rliest dawn,
      and at dusk…….why territory should be bounded by such sheer loveliness that=
      blends
      and harmonises and lives! If this is the demarcation of territory, perhaps =
      we should
      emulate the birds and sing our boundaries…..

      Bound hand and foot the mariner see-man is cast into the `outermost darknes=
      s of the
      world' into abyss experience , surviving, surfacing to find himself floati=
      ng peacefully
      trusting beneath sunny skies on a blue sea, to rescue and new life. His gr=
      eat
      monetary wealth disappears as mysteriously as it came, and he becomes
      spiritually wealthy, and self supporting. The hallmark of true shipwreck i=
      nitiation is
      the complete change in the mariner, now Captain, taking a new course steer=
      ed by a
      different star. "I am the master of my fate, I am the Captain of my soul"
      There are many insights and undertones to this wonderful book. Lavish =

      entertainments and `tableaux vivants' are performed and presented to sated =

      humanity while those who watch and lose themselves in the pleasures thus af=
      forded
      never suspect that all is done by the agency of demons and elementals who s=
      erve
      food, act out dramas, dance and play music without anyone suspecting their =

      presence, or discerning their sinister purpose. Very much as life is lived =
      today.
      How few suspect the intelligent entity incarnate in television and com=
      puter, or
      realise the prostitution of elemental beings in adulterated food and unnatu=
      ral farming
      practices? How many of us recognize demon faces in the electro-magnetic mag=
      ic of
      luxuries procured from the nether realms of sub ethers, or see the tortured=
      beings
      forced down into the mental wasteland of arid-sub thought?
      In the book two very sensible dogs see, or rather smell, through the d=
      evil's
      disguise, as dogs are wont to do. A dog can smell the planets……

      "They haven't got no noses'
      The fallen sons of Eve
      Even the smell of roses
      Is not what they supposes;
      But more than mind discloses
      And more than men believe" Chesterton

      Our hope lies in the shipwrecking of the silicon-chip ship and the mig=
      hty
      awakening abyss-initiation that can arise out of it. And many souls have c=
      ome
      through just such experiences, and yet remain shipwrecked because they have=
      not
      the context of spiritual science to make sense of their journeying in psych=
      o-spiritual
      waters, which can be so murky and dangerous. Very often these crisis (crisi=
      s meaning
      – discern – judge) are not as productive of change as they can potentially =
      be, and can
      even lead to mental instability. This is a tragic waste, and the clearing o=
      f the spiritual
      air is surely a task for anthroposophists. If a crisis is to produce that =
      deep inner
      certainty of change, it must also be discerned, evaluated in the context of=
      spiritual
      scientific ideas and concepts so that productive work can be undertaken.
      That Marie Corelli was well aware of what lies (!) behind government is =
      shown by
      the last paragraph.

      "At last, just as Big Ben chimed a quarter to eleven, one man whom I i=
      nstantly
      recognised as a well known Cabinet Minister came walking briskly towards t=
      he House
      (Parliament) then, and then only , he whom I had known as Lucio, advanced =
      smiling.
      Greeting the Minister cordially, in that musical rich voice I knew of old, =
      he took his
      arm – and they both walked on, talking earnestly. I watched them till thei=
      r figures
      receded in the moonlight….the one tall, kingly and commanding, the other bu=
      rly and
      broad, and self assertive in demeanour; I saw them ascend the steps, and fi=
      nally
      disappear within the House of England's Imperial Government – Devil and Man=
      –
      together!" end quote from "The Sorrows of Satan" by Marie Corelli.

      She was a superb writer, preparing the etheric atmosphere for the reception=
      of the
      Christian Initiation. Some of us only use rhyme or doggerel to bookmark mo=
      ments in
      our lives……perhaps making them accessible to other people. No more than tha=
      t!
      Jan
    • Harvey Bornfield
      And to add to their awesome, delightful intuitions, though no more need be said, nonetheless, we hope you ll not regard what echoes from yet another
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 3, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        And to add to their awesome, delightful intuitions, though no more need be said, nonetheless, we hope you'll not regard what echoes from yet another "unannounced ring of the same tree" as both Danny and Jan earlier this week touched as tedious or redundant.......

        Buried in the center of a little known poem called the "Flair of the Midnight Sun", a strange and intriguing line which speaks of being Shipwrecked in the archetypal sense:
        "One said, 'I shall describe' and was engulfed instead"

        The primordial and predestined condition of the once and future human being, is to be re-welcomed as a native dweller of a sea of light, aloof to the magnetism, the metaphysical suction which courts gravity, and strange to say, seeks vicissitudes of passionate turbulence, a gauntlet of reckless, rebellious abandon, alternating with holy peace and sublime adoration.

        So we are dwellers of a Great Between, and reside within a long "Meanwhile", a condition which stretches out over a gulf 'twixt two realms, two precipices called "Before" and "After". Having fallen prey to gravity, man seeks to rise by developing stance, And this he achieves by opposing the spin and whirl of the world upon resort to borrowed biological energy, upon three-score-ten loan of Mercy and Bounty, which he claims as his own; and so even unto fair love and fair war, he fames himself spice-like with all manner of fresh adventure, till a concealed wise part of him he often does not recognize slowly germinates, and this takes his helm through dream and vision and through the Exalting Powers of Remorse and Renewal rising within, nobly rendering him by slow degrees, over the largo of encroaching decades, indifferent to the seductive hold of this mortal playground. All this as reflection, the muse who authors the power to achieve silence, arises to challenge sweet and turbulent enchantment, even as Bacon describes demise in his volume New Atlantis in a chapter called "Concerning the life of nations" "Till it waxeth dry and exhaust."

        And so our top, losing franchise over the forces of infancy, adolescence and maturity, moves on, growing inert of spin, and wobbling, til at last solemn death, the ultimate Must, buckles his proud stance and with it the gift of external freedom and imagined independence, that gift itself but a borrowed Manna. And so the auric-bathe we call Food for Imagination, coagulates to but literal food, and like Joseph's allegory of many rainbows corroded by doubt and other metaphysical stealth, husks over, grayscales into sorry fact, his legend loses its salt. And so turning mute of influence, paralyzes into fundamentalism, suffering an angry spiritual death well-camouflaged behind a Pied-Pipers veneer of ferocious enthusiasm. Watch your press conferences!

        So just as it is possible to describe the loss of fascination and obsession with the matrix of biological forces which corral us in the square walls of this fallen circle, so also the Christ, just as to the treadless, gleam-robed Angels before us once and ever floating appears, He joyously makes of us noble locksmiths to our crush of captive confinements.

        Now as the moment of initiation draws near, it is revealed that these mortal bodies are, as we all radiantly guessed, but ships, and make frail cocoon to keep us artificially dry, ships atop whose sturdy wooden floorboards we're carried on, escorted on wood which makes shoes on which to walk the sea, and which safeguarding this sextant, keeping it dry wherewith to enable us to navigate the night sky of mortal existence by resort to the frail scaffolding of but an Outer North Star; all this, while clairvoyance is in drydock, all this ere one has rediscovered how to access and employ Strength and Grace, which debut within, and allow, and invite us to walk on the waters of spirit, to tread the sky like the angels, uninterrupted by spikes of desire, or the obsessions into which they shrinkwrap, like a disenchanted Lucifer falling into the grip of Ahriman.

        But un-numb yourself, cheer up, pale Earlyfire :-)))
        Goethe describes the future of the entire human race in his poem "
        Gesang der Geister über den Wassern (Song of the Spirit over the Waters)
        
        "Soul of Man, how like unto water, Destiny of Man, how like to the wind" (Schubert sets it to music)

        And now, our ideas hopscotch backward a couple of brief centuries, moving forward:
        Now Shakespeare, in his Tempest, one of the sublime fairytales, speaks through Prospero, who is exiled to a remote island together with his little daughter Miranda decades ago as a 'punishment' for being oblivious to his brothers conspiracy maliciously spawned while he, innocent, tends to his esoteric studies over the mundane his affairs of his dukedom.

        There, having perfected to adepthood the ability to commune with and command the secret forces, he utilizes his divine sorcery, deciding to reverse the verdict of his fate, and move it forward from stalemate into destiny. And therefore, armed with access to Powers of Nature, he calls forth the powers of sea and wind to shipwreck that very vessel which bears the erstwhile conspirators into an experience of most unlikely, unfamiliar sea-change, which one 'third-eye-sees' as initiation. And so sources a storm to liberate those enclosed with a mortal perspective, from their compressed, power-based point of view. Rejoice: Your ship is a wheelchair, and you are people about to learn to walk again. And shattering that mariner's cocoon, Prospero will land these same characters in his realm, making them guests to his grand design to work justice and wonder; then it will become possible for all of them to make exodus from their turf-bound allegiances and loyalties. They will, as has been mentioned before, in a very allegorical sense, cross the threshold. (Beethoven has composed a piano sonata, which the Bard probably inspired, called, yes, wouldn't you guess "The Tempest")

        And finally, returning to the present, consider how Leonard Cohen's poem Susanne translates this notion of death and rebirth which mirrors Golgotha:

        And Jesus was a sailor
        When he walked upon the water
        And he spent a long time watching
        From his lonely wooden tower
        And when he knew for certain
        Only drowning men could see him
        He said "All men will be sailors then
        Until the sea shall free them"


        In this way, it becomes possible to entertain the notion that it is possible to visualize initiation as the ability to embrace, hence survive drowning, which is to say, to undergo shipwreck. And all has occurred as we have said:

        "One said, 'I shall describe' and was engulfed instead"


        Warm Regards,
        Harvey
        Tucson, Arizona

        At 10:33 PM 8/31/2003, you wrote:

           Following the adventures of various ships in the past weeks, we inevitab=
        ly come to
        the defining moment of shipwreck.  We have seen the world through the Glitt=
        ering
        Eye of the ice-bound shipwrecked Mariner, who, as he must, seeks to awaken =
        others
        to the truth of their position as passive life-tourists, dreamily enjoying =
        the comfort
        and luxury of a deckchair on the Titanic, heading for the Iceberg of Ahrima=
        n.
             The shipwreck is a threshold experience,totally transformative, a pass=
        ing through
        an horizon portal that lies in the nowhere-everywhere land between air and =
        water,
        light and life and death. To become the salt of the earth one must plunge i=
        nto the
        salt-SEE.
             Shipwreck is an initiation of pure grace, a moment of utter aloneness =
        upon infinite
        depths, in terror, nakedness and bereft of all weighty possessions that sin=
        k beneath
        the waves, leaving only what is buoyant, levity born, truly human, to float=
        .  The
        situation is grave, but graves belong to gravity - necessary indeed to expe=
        rience the
        ego in the red blood cells, but also necessary -vital - are the restored `t=
        ree of life'
        ethers that lift and bear aloft. The sickness is not unto death!  Coleridge=
        's Mariner is
        marooned rather than utterly shipwrecked, but the analogy holds good.  `All=
        the
        mountains and Islands were moved out of their places'  the island of the eg=
        o is very
        lonely. As is a stranded ship. The Lesser Guardian stands aside. A wonderfu=
        l
        imagination of the shipwreck-initiation is to be found in Marie Corelli's b=
        ook "The
        Sorrows of Satan" which follows the adventures of a writer and his relation=
        ship to
        Lucio-Rimanez (Lucifer-Ahriman) who  (as someone else once sang) `introduce=
        s
        himself as a man of wealth and taste' and mysteriously befriends a struggli=
        ng writer,
        making him fabulously rich , opening every worldly door, ensuring fame and =

        recognition, satisfying every desire, just barely incognito, always hoping =
        to be
        recognised and resisted and therefore redeemed.  If he wins he loses, and s=
        o hates
        and despises every soul who cannot resist his temptations.
              The descent into atomic materialism and decadence and it's destructiv=
        e effect
        upon society is explored in detail, the man shown as symptom of the greater=
        malady,
        a hermetic connection always clearly drawn.  The shipwreck is the culminati=
        on of his
        adventuring in the godless world of science, wealth and celebrity, eyes res=
        olutely
        closed, aboard Lucio's yacht, `Flame' a vessel mysteriously powered by elec=
        tricity. The
        prototype of the Silicon-chip ship? Demons and spectres are crew and also u=
        nwanted
        companions. When for the first time, Lucifer Ahriman is unveiled, the seasc=
        ape turns
        to ice, a frozen world stretches everywhere around.  The Flame-yacht  of Lu=
        cifer
        steers through the Ahrimanic ice, through an infernal horror of desperately=
        suffering
        souls.  A question is asked - whom is to be served?  A choice must be made.=

         
             " The question thundered in my ears……shuddering, I looked from right t=
        o left,
        and saw a gathering crowd of faces, white, wistful, wondering, threatening =
        and
        imploring. – they pressed about me close, with glistening eyes and lips tha=
        t moved
        dumbly. And as they stared upon me I beheld another spectral thing – the im=
        age of
        Myself!  - a poor frail creature, pitiful, ignorant, and undiscerning – lim=
        ited in both
        capacity and intelligence, yet full of a strange egotism and still stranger=
        arrogance;
        every detail of my life was suddenly presented to me in a magic mirror, and=
        I read my
        own chronicle of paltry intellectual pride, vulgar ambition, and vulgarer o=
        stentation – I
        realized with shame my miserable vices, my puny scorn of God, my effronteri=
        es and
        blasphemies; and in the sudden strong repulsion and repudiation of my own
        worthless existence, being and character, I found both voice and speech.  `=
        God only!'
        I cried fervently – `Annihilation at His hands, rather than life without Hi=
        m!  God only!  I
        have chosen!"   end quote

             Throughout this whole terrible experience a bird yet sings; a heavenly=
        soul song. 
        The bird song theme is present throughout the book, a woman author characte=
        r
        whose spiritual books are castigated by modern society is named Mavis – mea=
        ning
        thrush, and the birdsong of hope is ever present, heard here and there in s=
        natches
        and stray notes. Birdsong was not underestimated in novels of this period (=
        1895)
              Feed the birds, dear friends! Feed the birds! Birdsong is more than  =
        creative
        modulation of etheric forces, star mediated flower shaping sound.  Birdsong=
        is
        individually spiritually potent, the pied Piper of the Soul, calling from t=
        he future, while
        stirring remembrances of past spirit-stature.  Birdsong, we are told, is pu=
        rely
        territorial. One wonders why the birds are especially territorial in the ea=
        rliest dawn,
        and at dusk…….why territory should be bounded by such sheer loveliness that=
        blends
        and harmonises and lives! If this is the demarcation of territory, perhaps =
        we should
        emulate the birds and sing our boundaries…..

        Bound hand and foot the mariner see-man is cast into the `outermost darknes=
        s of the
        world' into abyss experience ,  surviving, surfacing to find himself floati=
        ng peacefully  
        trusting beneath sunny skies on a blue sea, to rescue and new life.  His gr=
        eat
        monetary wealth disappears as mysteriously as it came, and he becomes
        spiritually wealthy, and self supporting.  The hallmark of true shipwreck i=
        nitiation is
        the complete change in the mariner, now Captain, taking  a new course steer=
        ed by a
        different star. "I am the master of my fate, I am the Captain of my soul"
             There are many insights and undertones to this wonderful book. Lavish =

        entertainments and `tableaux vivants' are performed and presented to sated =

        humanity while those who watch and lose themselves in the pleasures thus af=
        forded
        never suspect that all is done by the agency of demons and elementals who s=
        erve
        food, act out dramas, dance and play music without anyone suspecting their =

        presence, or discerning their sinister purpose. Very much as life is lived =
        today. 
             How few suspect the intelligent entity incarnate in television and com=
        puter, or
        realise the prostitution of elemental beings in adulterated food and unnatu=
        ral farming
        practices? How many of us recognize demon faces in the electro-magnetic mag=
        ic of
        luxuries procured from the nether realms of sub ethers, or see the tortured=
        beings
        forced down into the mental wasteland of arid-sub thought?
             In the book two very sensible dogs see, or rather smell, through the d=
        evil's
        disguise, as dogs are wont to do. A dog can smell the planets……

               "They haven't got no noses'
                 The fallen sons of Eve
                 Even the smell of roses
                 Is not what they supposes;
                 But more than mind discloses
                 And more than men believe"   Chesterton

             Our hope lies in the shipwrecking of the silicon-chip ship and the mig=
        hty
        awakening abyss-initiation that can arise out of it.  And many souls have c=
        ome
        through just such experiences, and yet remain shipwrecked because they have=
        not
        the context of spiritual science to make sense of their journeying in psych=
        o-spiritual
        waters, which can be so murky and dangerous. Very often these crisis (crisi=
        s meaning
        – discern – judge) are not as productive of change as they can potentially =
        be, and can
        even lead to mental instability. This is a tragic waste, and the clearing o=
        f the spiritual
        air is surely a task for anthroposophists.  If a crisis is to produce that =
        deep inner
        certainty of change, it must also be discerned, evaluated in the context of=
        spiritual
        scientific ideas and concepts so that productive work can be undertaken.
          That Marie Corelli was well aware of what lies (!) behind government is  =
        shown by
        the last paragraph.

             "At last, just as Big Ben chimed a quarter to eleven, one man whom I i=
        nstantly
        recognised as a well known Cabinet Minister  came walking briskly towards t=
        he House
        (Parliament)  then, and then only , he whom I had known as Lucio, advanced =
        smiling. 
        Greeting the Minister cordially, in that musical rich voice I knew of old, =
        he took his
        arm – and they both walked on, talking earnestly.  I watched them till thei=
        r figures
        receded in the moonlight….the one tall, kingly and commanding, the other bu=
        rly and
        broad, and self assertive in demeanour; I saw them ascend the steps, and fi=
        nally
        disappear within the House of England's Imperial Government – Devil and Man=
        –
        together!" end quote from "The Sorrows of Satan" by Marie Corelli.

        She was a superb writer, preparing the etheric atmosphere for the reception=
        of the
        Christian Initiation.  Some of us only use rhyme or doggerel to bookmark mo=
        ments in
        our lives……perhaps making them accessible to other people. No more than tha=
        t!
        Jan



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        Ludwig van Beethoven


      • joksu57
        Hello Jan! Warm thanks for your fine Corelli contribution ! (The M. Kyber s text was also a real food for feelings .) Many, many years ago a bought a book
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 4, 2003
        • 0 Attachment
          Hello Jan!

          Warm thanks for your fine "Corelli contribution"! (The M. Kyber's
          text was also a real food for "feelings".) Many, many years ago a
          bought a book from a second-hand bookshop. It was a Swedish book
          called "Prins Lucio" written by M. Corelli. It became instantly one
          of my favourite novels. I didn't know that the original name of the
          book was "The Sorrows of Satan" until I read it from your post. (The
          original name is much better.)

          The description of the "shipwreck initiation" is truly wonderfull.
          When I was reading your post about the subject, I started remembering
          what Dr. Steiner has said about the rosicrucian initiation. I mean
          one special detail, where one is in grave danger, very near death,
          and is then saved in the last moment. The "would-be-initiate" can
          feel that his life belongs now to some "greater cause".

          When we think about WMD, materialism, militarism etc. it can be said
          that nowadays the whole humanity is in grave danger. But then also
          great possibities for spiritual advancement must be at hand.
          The "blessings" of e.g. nuclear weapons are given to humanity by
          quite a small group of scientists. Perhaps it is so that also quite a
          small group of "spiritual scientist" can effect great changes, if
          they can follow Christ in thoughts, feelings and in deeds also. When
          a real "eccleesia" is living daily a true Christianity, then a
          larger "audience" can understand at lest theoretically, what
          spiritual science and Christ Event is all about.

          Jan wrote : "…Lucio-Rimanez (Lucifer-Ahriman) who (as someone else
          once sang) `introduces himself as a man of wealth and taste' and
          mysteriously befriends a struggling writer, making him fabulously
          rich, opening every worldly door, ensuring fame and
          recognition, satisfying every desire, just barely incognito, always
          hoping to be recognised and resisted and therefore redeemed. If he
          wins he loses, and so hates and despises every soul who cannot
          resist his temptations. " (end of quote)

          When a Finnish occultist Mr. Ervast was once talking about Corelli's
          book and the nature of Satan, he referred to an old Indian legend
          (I'm not sure if it was about "Hanuman". I don't remember where this
          text was, so this is all based on my memory). Anyway, in the legend
          there was a fallen creature, who was very powerfull and in his lust
          for power did much damage. But then this high "King" repented his
          deeds and the gods gave him two possibilities: 1) For a very long
          time the King could do helpfull deeds or 2) for a shorter time he
          must continue doing the same as before, to keep up this "school of
          temptations"; only now it is some sort of unpleasant sacrifice for
          him. And the fallen King choosed the second option…

          If we think along the lines indicated above, then it must be said
          that a creature of this calibre (Satan) is not a retarded angel
          (lucifer) from the Moon period, nor a retarded archangel (ahriman)
          from the Sun period, but rather a fallen seraphim. Father and Christ
          are of course above all angel hierarchies.

          Anyway, the attitude shown by Marie Corelli is truly a Christian one:
          there is no fear or hate against the Satan. One must just recognize
          Satan's inspiration, refuse from it and then follow the example of
          Jesus Christ.

          Joksu


          --- In anthroposophy@yahoogroups.com, "starbirdgarden"
          <starbirdgarden@b...> wrote:
          >
          > Following the adventures of various ships in the past weeks, we
          inevitab=
          > ly come to
          > the defining moment of shipwreck. We have seen the world through
          the Glitt=
          > ering
          > Eye of the ice-bound shipwrecked Mariner, who, as he must, seeks to
          awaken =
          > others
          > to the truth of their position as passive life-tourists, dreamily
          enjoying =
          > the comfort
          > and luxury of a deckchair on the Titanic, heading for the Iceberg
          of Ahrima=
          > n.
          > The shipwreck is a threshold experience,totally
          transformative, a pass=
          > ing through
          > an horizon portal that lies in the nowhere-everywhere land between
          air and =
          > water,
          > light and life and death. To become the salt of the earth one must
          plunge i=
          > nto the
          > salt-SEE.
          > Shipwreck is an initiation of pure grace, a moment of utter
          aloneness =
          > upon infinite
          > depths, in terror, nakedness and bereft of all weighty possessions
          that sin=
          > k beneath
          > the waves, leaving only what is buoyant, levity born, truly human,
          to float=
          > . The
          > situation is grave, but graves belong to gravity - necessary indeed
          to expe=
          > rience the
          > ego in the red blood cells, but also necessary -vital - are the
          restored `t=
          > ree of life'
          > ethers that lift and bear aloft. The sickness is not unto death!
          Coleridge=
          > 's Mariner is
          > marooned rather than utterly shipwrecked, but the analogy holds
          good. `All=
          > the
          > mountains and Islands were moved out of their places' the island
          of the eg=
          > o is very
          > lonely. As is a stranded ship. The Lesser Guardian stands aside. A
          wonderfu=
          > l
          > imagination of the shipwreck-initiation is to be found in Marie
          Corelli's b=
          > ook "The
          > Sorrows of Satan" which follows the adventures of a writer and his
          relation=
          > ship to
          > Lucio-Rimanez (Lucifer-Ahriman) who (as someone else once sang)
          `introduce=
          > s
          > himself as a man of wealth and taste' and mysteriously befriends a
          struggli=
          > ng writer,
          > making him fabulously rich , opening every worldly door, ensuring
          fame and =
          >
          > recognition, satisfying every desire, just barely incognito, always
          hoping =
          > to be
          > recognised and resisted and therefore redeemed. If he wins he
          loses, and s=
          > o hates
          > and despises every soul who cannot resist his temptations.
          > The descent into atomic materialism and decadence and it's
          destructiv=
          > e effect
          > upon society is explored in detail, the man shown as symptom of the
          greater=
          > malady,
          > a hermetic connection always clearly drawn. The shipwreck is the
          culminati=
          > on of his
          > adventuring in the godless world of science, wealth and celebrity,
          eyes res=
          > olutely
          > closed, aboard Lucio's yacht, `Flame' a vessel mysteriously powered
          by elec=
          > tricity. The
          > prototype of the Silicon-chip ship? Demons and spectres are crew
          and also u=
          > nwanted
          > companions. When for the first time, Lucifer Ahriman is unveiled,
          the seasc=
          > ape turns
          > to ice, a frozen world stretches everywhere around. The Flame-
          yacht of Lu=
          > cifer
          > steers through the Ahrimanic ice, through an infernal horror of
          desperately=
          > suffering
          > souls. A question is asked - whom is to be served? A choice must
          be made.=
          >
          >
          > " The question thundered in my ears……shuddering, I looked from
          right t=
          > o left,
          > and saw a gathering crowd of faces, white, wistful, wondering,
          threatening =
          > and
          > imploring. – they pressed about me close, with glistening eyes and
          lips tha=
          > t moved
          > dumbly. And as they stared upon me I beheld another spectral thing –
          the im=
          > age of
          > Myself! - a poor frail creature, pitiful, ignorant, and
          undiscerning – lim=
          > ited in both
          > capacity and intelligence, yet full of a strange egotism and still
          stranger=
          > arrogance;
          > every detail of my life was suddenly presented to me in a magic
          mirror, and=
          > I read my
          > own chronicle of paltry intellectual pride, vulgar ambition, and
          vulgarer o=
          > stentation – I
          > realized with shame my miserable vices, my puny scorn of God, my
          effronteri=
          > es and
          > blasphemies; and in the sudden strong repulsion and repudiation of
          my own
          > worthless existence, being and character, I found both voice and
          speech. `=
          > God only!'
          > I cried fervently – `Annihilation at His hands, rather than life
          without Hi=
          > m! God only! I
          > have chosen!" end quote
          >
          > Throughout this whole terrible experience a bird yet sings; a
          heavenly=
          > soul song.
          > The bird song theme is present throughout the book, a woman author
          characte=
          > r
          > whose spiritual books are castigated by modern society is named
          Mavis – mea=
          > ning
          > thrush, and the birdsong of hope is ever present, heard here and
          there in s=
          > natches
          > and stray notes. Birdsong was not underestimated in novels of this
          period (=
          > 1895)
          > Feed the birds, dear friends! Feed the birds! Birdsong is
          more than =
          > creative
          > modulation of etheric forces, star mediated flower shaping sound.
          Birdsong=
          > is
          > individually spiritually potent, the pied Piper of the Soul,
          calling from t=
          > he future, while
          > stirring remembrances of past spirit-stature. Birdsong, we are
          told, is pu=
          > rely
          > territorial. One wonders why the birds are especially territorial
          in the ea=
          > rliest dawn,
          > and at dusk…….why territory should be bounded by such sheer
          loveliness that=
          > blends
          > and harmonises and lives! If this is the demarcation of territory,
          perhaps =
          > we should
          > emulate the birds and sing our boundaries…..
          >
          > Bound hand and foot the mariner see-man is cast into the `outermost
          darknes=
          > s of the
          > world' into abyss experience , surviving, surfacing to find
          himself floati=
          > ng peacefully
          > trusting beneath sunny skies on a blue sea, to rescue and new
          life. His gr=
          > eat
          > monetary wealth disappears as mysteriously as it came, and he
          becomes
          > spiritually wealthy, and self supporting. The hallmark of true
          shipwreck i=
          > nitiation is
          > the complete change in the mariner, now Captain, taking a new
          course steer=
          > ed by a
          > different star. "I am the master of my fate, I am the Captain of my
          soul"
          > There are many insights and undertones to this wonderful book.
          Lavish =
          >
          > entertainments and `tableaux vivants' are performed and presented
          to sated =
          >
          > humanity while those who watch and lose themselves in the pleasures
          thus af=
          > forded
          > never suspect that all is done by the agency of demons and
          elementals who s=
          > erve
          > food, act out dramas, dance and play music without anyone
          suspecting their =
          >
          > presence, or discerning their sinister purpose. Very much as life
          is lived =
          > today.
          > How few suspect the intelligent entity incarnate in television
          and com=
          > puter, or
          > realise the prostitution of elemental beings in adulterated food
          and unnatu=
          > ral farming
          > practices? How many of us recognize demon faces in the electro-
          magnetic mag=
          > ic of
          > luxuries procured from the nether realms of sub ethers, or see the
          tortured=
          > beings
          > forced down into the mental wasteland of arid-sub thought?
          > In the book two very sensible dogs see, or rather smell,
          through the d=
          > evil's
          > disguise, as dogs are wont to do. A dog can smell the planets……
          >
          > "They haven't got no noses'
          > The fallen sons of Eve
          > Even the smell of roses
          > Is not what they supposes;
          > But more than mind discloses
          > And more than men believe" Chesterton
          >
          > Our hope lies in the shipwrecking of the silicon-chip ship and
          the mig=
          > hty
          > awakening abyss-initiation that can arise out of it. And many
          souls have c=
          > ome
          > through just such experiences, and yet remain shipwrecked because
          they have=
          > not
          > the context of spiritual science to make sense of their journeying
          in psych=
          > o-spiritual
          > waters, which can be so murky and dangerous. Very often these
          crisis (crisi=
          > s meaning
          > – discern – judge) are not as productive of change as they can
          potentially =
          > be, and can
          > even lead to mental instability. This is a tragic waste, and the
          clearing o=
          > f the spiritual
          > air is surely a task for anthroposophists. If a crisis is to
          produce that =
          > deep inner
          > certainty of change, it must also be discerned, evaluated in the
          context of=
          > spiritual
          > scientific ideas and concepts so that productive work can be
          undertaken.
          > That Marie Corelli was well aware of what lies (!) behind
          government is =
          > shown by
          > the last paragraph.
          >
          > "At last, just as Big Ben chimed a quarter to eleven, one man
          whom I i=
          > nstantly
          > recognised as a well known Cabinet Minister came walking briskly
          towards t=
          > he House
          > (Parliament) then, and then only , he whom I had known as Lucio,
          advanced =
          > smiling.
          > Greeting the Minister cordially, in that musical rich voice I knew
          of old, =
          > he took his
          > arm – and they both walked on, talking earnestly. I watched them
          till thei=
          > r figures
          > receded in the moonlight….the one tall, kingly and commanding, the
          other bu=
          > rly and
          > broad, and self assertive in demeanour; I saw them ascend the
          steps, and fi=
          > nally
          > disappear within the House of England's Imperial Government – Devil
          and Man=
          > –
          > together!" end quote from "The Sorrows of Satan" by Marie Corelli.
          >
          > She was a superb writer, preparing the etheric atmosphere for the
          reception=
          > of the
          > Christian Initiation. Some of us only use rhyme or doggerel to
          bookmark mo=
          > ments in
          > our lives……perhaps making them accessible to other people. No more
          than tha=
          > t!
          > Jan
        • Jan
          ... Hello Joksu, Good to speak to you again, and could not agree more with what you write. I¹m sure you have much to say on Deserts as well as
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 5, 2003
          • 0 Attachment
            Re: [anthroposophy] Re: Silicon-Chip-Shipwreck On 4/9/03 1:31 pm, "joksu57" <jouko.sorvali@...> wrote:

                 Hello Jan!



            The description of the "shipwreck initiation" is truly wonderfull.
            When I was reading your post about the subject, I started remembering
            what Dr. Steiner has said about the rosicrucian initiation. I mean
            one special detail, where one is in grave danger, very near death,
            and is then saved in the last moment. The "would-be-initiate" can

            feel that his life belongs now to some "greater cause".

            Hello Joksu,   Good to speak to you again, and could not agree more with what you write. I’m sure you have much to say on Deserts as well as Shipwrecks....... Moses, Christ, Temptations?  Look forward to hearing from you, Jan

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