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politics and spirit

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  • Joel Wendt
    Dear Friends, The question is being asked by Events themselves: Whether the art and craft of statesmanship (mere politics transformed by spirit) has anything
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 24, 2003
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      Dear Friends,

      The question is being asked by Events themselves: Whether the art and
      craft of statesmanship (mere politics transformed by spirit) has
      anything to contribute to our current world situation?

      Having been drawn into the Circus of Public Life in the United States,
      and given that not one of us is free of the consequences of what is
      happening, I find that even though what I am doing may be seen by some
      as foolish, for me being a Fool is quite preferable to doing nothing.

      For these reasons I am drawing attention to something I wrote during
      the beginning days of the war. I apologize in advance to those who will
      object to my filling up your e-mail box with this, and can understand if
      you do not like it. I do not apologize for risking your displeasure to
      make a contribution to the ongoing conversation over the meaning and
      future of our civilization.

      The piece is called: "Re-imagining the Conduct of the Presidency: - a
      Presidential Campaign as an Act of Statecraft,and the Presidency as the
      Art and Craft of Statesmanship", and can be found on-line at:
      http://ipwebdev.com/campaign/cg12.html

      Please forward this if you feel so inclined.

      warm regards,
      joel

      also known as:
      Joel A. Wendt

      alternative candidate for President of the United States of America
      campaign website: "some thoughts on the nature of public service - and
      an offer of service" http://ipwebdev.com/hermit
      research website: "Shapes in the Fire" http://ipwebdev.com/hermit
    • elaineupton2001
      Hello Joel and all interested, Joel, thanks for your article, one that I have read in parts, but not in its entirety (partly because I do not find reading long
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 27, 2003
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        Hello Joel and all interested,

        Joel, thanks for your article, one that I have read in parts, but not
        in its entirety (partly because I do not find reading long pieces on
        screen easy, and in this library I have reached my print out limit
        for the day).

        So, what I say is tentative, and I hope not a distortion of your
        essay.

        I appreciate what you say about the government of the U.S. having an
        impulse in an IDEAL ("the government of the people, by the people,
        for the people"), and about how our so-called public servants,
        politicians (not all, but many, including the current President) are
        more subject to market forces than to serving the IDEAL. Also, you
        recognize that "America" is young and still (hopefully) learning to
        pursue this ideal. There is lack of enlightened self-interest (on the
        part of people, and, I'd say, on the part of corporations), but an
        increasingly enlightened citizenry and strong citizen movement can
        change the nature of 'politics as usual', so to say.

        This is my reading (so far) of your essay. If I distort something,
        please correct me.

        I do vote--let me say--and yet I am skeptical about the whole process
        of voting (and my skepticism existed long before the corruption
        exposed in Florida in the last Presidential "election"). We are a
        large nation, and that makes for problems with the ideal of consensus-
        making, and yet, it is consensus-making that I see as promoting the
        ideals of true inner and social freedom. Voting will always involve
        taking the majority view, but the majority view can be measured as
        51%, and still there are 49% who don't agree with this majority.
        Consensus involves work so that everyone in the end (or something
        near everyone) is included, and this can be a long process, as you
        probably know, but that does not make it less valid. On the
        contrary...

        I think the natives of this land have a lot to teach us (not all
        natives are practitioners of a kind of spirit of consensus, but the
        ideal is alive among many).

        Well, that's my two wampum pieces for now. Thanks for writing, and
        let's continue this, if you will (and with all who will).

        Blessings,
        elaine
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