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Re: Does the spirit world really exist?

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  • elaineupton2001
    Hello Sarah, Welcome to the list (and to the conscious world of Anthroposophy, or Spiritual Science)! ... I think Owen Barfield can do that much better than I,
    Message 1 of 38 , Sep 1, 2002
      Hello Sarah,

      Welcome to the list (and to the conscious world of Anthroposophy, or
      Spiritual Science)!

      You write:

      >((...))
      >
      > Elaine, you mentioned a book that described the differences between
      > imagination and fantasy. Could you please explain this difference?

      I think Owen Barfield can do that much better than I, or Coleridge
      himself, who is Barfield's source. If it's still in print, see
      Barfield's amazing book, SAVING THE APPEARANCES (published in
      England, and maybe the U.S.). Also, you can read the English Romantic
      poet, Samuel Taylor Coleridge in his essays on Imagination and
      Fantasy. Imagination, I'd say, is the exercise of a more conscious
      spiritual activity (Bildung, in German), whereas fantasy is idle
      play. But read the above mentioned works for much more detail and
      deeper encounter with the terms and ideas.


      Also what
      > is the difference between 'colridgian' imagination and so
      called 'normal'
      > imagination?

      "Normal" imagination is often just idle fantasy, something very
      immature and dreamy and irresponsible. Imagination, as I said, is a
      more spiritual activity, engaged in for the purpose of making a
      connection between the known and unknown, seen and unseen, a part
      of "original participation" in the creative process (instead of
      remaining outside it and coming up with all kinds of idle musings and
      inorganic notions).
      To practice this requires much study, I'd say, at least for most of
      us.

      Then, if you want to go into a related aspect of all this, Steiner
      often lectures about what I will call the three I's (with a
      capital "I"): Imagination, Inspiration, and Intuition--the latter
      being the higher of the spiritual activities.

      Best wishes,
      elaine
    • Carol
      Hi Sarah, Colridge used the term primary imagination to point out that we actually perceive the world through our active engagment with it- without imagining
      Message 38 of 38 , Sep 1, 2002
        Hi Sarah,

        Colridge used the term 'primary imagination' to point out
        that we actually perceive the world through our active
        engagment with it- without imagining 'it' there would be no
        world. Now, he's not saying we each just make up the world
        and that's that. We use our minds to touch reality. Fantasy
        is more about the manipulations of inner pictures that we
        surf on through the day. Nice to meet ya!

        Carol
        --- Sarah <sarahwh@...> wrote:
        > Hello,
        > I'm new here. I'm doing the Foundations course and am about
        > a quarter of the
        > way thru, so I'm just new to it all.
        >
        > Elaine, you mentioned a book that described the differences
        > between
        > imagination and fantasy. Could you please explain this
        > difference? Also what
        > is the difference between 'colridgian' imagination and so
        > called 'normal'
        > imagination?
        >
        > Thanks
        > Sarah
        >
        >
        >


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