Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: THE GREAT VIRTUES

Expand Messages
  • 888
    Imagine how a man who has become especially wise stretches out the organs of his wisdom mightily, like the branches of a tree. They originate in the cerebellum
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 8, 1999
    • 0 Attachment
      Imagine how a man who has become especially wise stretches out the
      organs of his wisdom mightily, like the branches of a tree. They
      originate in the cerebellum which remains within the hard covering of
      the skull; but the
      spiritual organs stretch out, and man is under the tree, the Bodhi tree,
      in spiritual reality.
      And so we see too that what we do in wisdom is the most spiritual thing
      about us, or at least belongs to the most spiritual, for the organs are
      already at rest. If we do anything with our hands, we must use part of
      our strength in the movement of the hand. If we form a wise judgment, or
      decide something wisely, the organs remain at rest, strength is no
      longer used upon the physical organ. We are there more spiritual; those
      organs which we use on the physical plane for the development of wisdom
      are those on which we need to use the least amount of energy - they are
      in a sense the most perfect.

      Thus wisdom is something in the moral life which allows men to
      experience themselves in a spiritual way. It is connected with this that
      what man attains in the way of wisdom enables him to reap the greatest
      harvest from his earlier incarnations. Because we can live in wisdom
      within the spirit without any effort by the physical organs, we are most
      able through the life of wisdom to make fruitful what we have won in
      earlier incarnations for this life, bringing over this wisdom from
      earlier incarnations.

      We have in German a good expression for a man who refuses to become
      wise. We call him a Philistine.* A Philistine is a man who resists the
      development of wisdom, who wants to remain as he is his whole life
      through, without altering his opinions. A man who seeks to become wise
      makes the effort to carry over the work which he has done and stored up
      in the course of earlier incarnations. The wiser we become, the more we
      bring over from earlier incarnations into the present, and if we do not
      wish to become wise, so that we leave barren the wisdom developed in
      earlier incarnations, there is then one who comes to saw it off:
      Ahriman.


      No-one likes it better than Ahriman that we fail to grow wiser. We have
      the power to do it. We have gained far, far more in earlier incarnations
      than we believe; we won far more during the times in which we passed
      through the old conditions of clairvoyance. Everyone could become much
      wiser than he does become. No-one has the excuse that he could not bring
      over from the past.

      * The German and the English meaning of the word are rather different.
      (Tr.)
    • 888
      To become wise means that one develops what has been won in earlier incarnations in such a way that it fills us in this incarnation. * * * Another virtue can
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 17, 1999
      • 0 Attachment
        To become wise means that one develops what has been won in earlier
        incarnations in such a way that it fills us in this incarnation.
        * * *

        Another virtue can be called though it is difficult to describe it
        exactly - the virtue of Courage. It contains the mood which does not
        remain passive towards life, but is ready to use its strength and
        activity. It can be said that this virtue comes from the heart. Of one
        who has this virtue in ordinary life it can be said: he has his heart in
        the right place.

        This is a good expression for our condition when we do not withdraw in a
        timid way from things which life asks from us, but when we are prepared
        to take ourselves in hand and know how to intervene where it is
        necessary. When we are inclined to get moving, confidently and bravely,
        we have this virtue. It is connected with a healthy life of feeling,
        which develops bravery at the right moment, while its absence brings
        about cowardice.

        This virtue can naturally be used in the physical course of life only
        through specific organs. These organs, to which the physical and
        ethereal hearts belong, are not so perfect as those which serve wisdom.
        These organs are on the way to alter, and will indeed become different
        in the future.

        There is a great distinction between the brain and the heart in their
        relation to cosmic evolution. Suppose that a man goes through the gate
        of death, and passes through life between death and a new birth. His
        brain is altogether a work of the Gods. The brain is permeated by forces
        which leave him altogether when he goes through the gate of death, and
        for his next life the brain is built up entirely anew, not only
        materially, but also in its inner forces. That is not the case with the
        heart. With the heart it is so, that not the physical heart itself, but
        the forces which are active in the physical heart, remain in existence.
        These forces withdraw into the astral and into the Ego, and continue in
        existence between death and a new birth. The same forces, which beat
        within our hearts, beat again next time in our new incarnation. What
        works in the brain has gone; that does not appear in the next
        incarnation. But the forces active in the heart reappear in the next
        incarnation. If we contemplate the interior of the head we can say:
        invisible forces are working there, which compose the brain.

        More later....
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.