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Re: The Epic of Gilgamesh

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  • Stephen Hale
    ... It think it was precisely the Epic of Gilgamesh in Sumer that describes a bull standing in water (as one of the origins of the world) like in the myth
    Message 1 of 9 , Dec 3, 2008
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      --- In anthroposophy@yahoogroups.com, Mikko Nuuttila <bellmeine@...>
      wrote:
      >
      >
      > A sidenote: Sumer is much like the word Suomi (Finland in Finnish).
      It think it was precisely the Epic of Gilgamesh in Sumer that
      describes a bull standing in water (as one of the origins of the
      world) like in the myth about Lemminkäinen in Kalevala there is
      similarly one, I remember. I once read a comparison about those bulls
      somewhere and the opinion expressed in the article was that it was
      the same myth. Moreover, wasn't Gilgamesh a giant, for Kaleva was
      one? Perhaps there is a distant echo of linguistic similarity in the
      words Kaleva and Gilgamesh as well.
      >
      > There are many hundreds of Sumerian words in the present day
      Hungarian language and Hungarian is related to Finnish.
      >
      > Mikko

      The slaying of the Divine Bull of Heaven is a Gilgamesh story. Moses
      was orphaned by his loving mother, who sent the infant boy in a reed
      basket down the Nile river in order to save him from an earlier
      massacre of the kind that Joseph would hear in a dream, telling him
      to take his wife and young son into Egypt for a time. Moses was
      found by the pharaoh's daughter, and adopted into the family of
      Ramses I. Interestingly, he was found amidst the bullrushes, a form
      of papyrus existing at the time when Egypt still had swamps. Joseph
      would hear, in a dream again, that it was safe to return home to
      Bethlehem, but, in a stroke of intuition, veered off in order to play
      it safe, and went to the town of Nazareth to live. This is how the
      two Jesus boys came to live as neighbors.

      Steve
    • Nina
      ... wrote: That list was like receiving a fine fiery etheric force that surrounded my head like lapping tongues. I probably got further into the mystery of
      Message 2 of 9 , Dec 4, 2008
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        --- In anthroposophy@yahoogroups.com, "Stephen Hale" <sardisian01@...>
        wrote:
        That list was like receiving a fine fiery etheric force that
        surrounded my head like lapping tongues. I probably got further into
        the mystery of Gilgamesh there than anywhere else, as it really
        concerns the forming of the two major streams of time and space into
        the post-atlantean world. The Epic of Gilgamesh, the oldest of the
        national folk tales...

        Dear Steve,
        Can feel the impact from both of your descriptions - your summary and
        your experience on BvC. You have the ability to bring central themes
        into view with few words. This warms my heart and grounds my mind. Am
        thankful also to Robert Mason for bringing BvC to our attention - Nina
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