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Wonder and Reverence

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    Michael posted some of these quotes on my spiritualscience list a while back. I thought it worthwhile to combine them here. Dr. Steiner describes the
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 18 9:06 PM
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      Michael posted some of these quotes on my spiritualscience list a while
      back. I thought it worthwhile to combine them here. Dr. Steiner
      describes the worthlessness of mere thinking ...
      The World of the senses and the world of the spirit, lectures given
      between December 27th and January 1st 1912.

      " But now a man who has attained to a certain feeling of reverence, and
      then, having experienced this feeling of reverence, wanted to press
      forward with mere thought - such a man would again come to a
      nothingness.
      He would not be able to go any further. He would, it is true, make some
      discoveries that were quite correct, and because he had gone through
      these first two stages, he would with this correct knowledge have also
      acquired many clearly and firmly established points of view.
      But he would inevitably, for all that, soon fall into uncertainty. For a
      third condition must take hold in the soul after we have experienced
      wonder and reverence; and this third mood we may describe as -feeling
      oneself in wisdom-filled harmony with the laws of the world.
      And this feeling can be attained in no other way than by having insight
      in the worthlessness of mere thinking."

      (from: The world of the senses and the world of the spirit")
      "For all real knowledge, that hopes to have a chance of coming to grips
      with the riddles of the world, must grow out of the seed of wonder.
      A man may be ever so clever a thinker, he may even suffer from a
      superabundance of intelligence; if he has never passed through the stage
      of wonder
      nothing will come of it. He will give you a cleverly thought-out
      concatenation of ideas, containing nothing that is not correct - but
      correctness does not necessary lead to reality.
      It is absolutely essential that before we begin to think, before we so
      much as begin to set our thinking in motion, we experience the condition
      of wonder.
      A thinking which is set in motion without the condition of wonder
      remains nothing but a mere play of thought."

      -Bruce
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