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Occult symbols

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  • Nick Mandoki
    Hi all, Recently there was a discussion on this list regarding Swastikas, and why it was that clockwise/anticlockwise should inherently be regarded as
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 15, 2000
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      Hi all,

      Recently there was a discussion on this list regarding Swastikas, and
      why it was that clockwise/anticlockwise should inherently be regarded
      as good/evil.

      Personally I do not believe that intellectual discussion is the way
      to solve this problem, or the meaning of occult symbols in general. I
      believe that, to truly appreciate an occult symbol, it's meaning has
      to be "felt". It has to become something living within one's soul.

      Easier said than done, I know. However, taking the swastika as an
      example, this symbol probably originated in ancient India when people
      still had a natural clairvoyance. A person in that age who
      encountered the symbol would, I believe, instinctively recognise it's
      true meaning. Of course, in that age, this would all happen without
      the perceiver's concious awareness.

      Nowadays we are much more concious of what we are looking at but,
      save for the initiates, we are much less able to understand the
      symbols true meaning. To understand the symbol at an intellectual
      level is a mere shadow of the true understanding which is possible.

      On the plus side, we can hope for a time in the future when our
      clairvoyance returns, this time in full conciousness.

      Moving on a little. The other day I was reading a book about the 15th
      Century Dutch artist Hieronymous Bosch. His paintings are loaded with
      symbols - swans spitting fire, nuns with books balanced on their
      heads, mummified feet, etc. The commentary explains the meaning of
      some of these symbols. Presumably these meanings are the results of
      studies by modern day art scholars. However the book also states that
      the meaning of many of these symbols is now lost, but would have been
      easily recognizable to Bosch's contemporaries.

      I wondered why this would be ? Did all artists of that era study at
      an artists' mystery school ? Were they initiates ? Did they have a
      natural bent towards symbology, or even a clairvoyance ? Was it just
      a grand co-incidence ?

      Anybody have any ideas ?

      Nick
    • starmann77@aol.com
      nmandoki@galway.com.au writes:
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 15, 2000
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        nmandoki@... writes:
        << The other day I was reading a book about the 15th
        Century Dutch artist Hieronymous Bosch. His paintings are loaded with
        symbols - swans spitting fire, nuns with books balanced on their
        heads, mummified feet, etc. The commentary explains the meaning of
        some of these symbols. Presumably these meanings are the results of
        studies by modern day art scholars. However the book also states that
        the meaning of many of these symbols is now lost, but would have been
        easily recognizable to Bosch's contemporaries.
        I wondered why this would be ? Did all artists of that era study at
        an artists' mystery school ? Were they initiates ? Did they have a
        natural bent towards symbology, or even a clairvoyance ? Was it just
        a grand co-incidence ?
        Anybody have any ideas ?
        Nick >>

        There was indeed a deep study of symbols that was part of a sacred
        artist's training, right down to the eighteenth century or so. When it was
        thrown out of science, it lasted only a little while longer before being
        thrown out of art. See, for example, C.S. Lewis' "The Discarded Image".

        Steiner made many references to this esoteric knowledge passed down
        through artists, for example in pointing out the many paintings of two Jesus
        children.

        Dr. Starman
      • arthra999@yahoo.com
        Regarding Swastikas, there s this old commercial building tin my town called the Phinney Building that was built in the early twenties I believe...
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 15, 2000
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          Regarding Swastikas, there's this old commercial building tin
          my town called the "Phinney Building" that was built in the early
          twenties I believe... emblazoned on the street side in brick facia
          is a might swastika about five feet across... this symbol at the
          time when it was built was to signify prosperity and good fortune.

          With the rise of Adolfo in the thirties the building stood and no
          one did much about it.

          During the second world war against fascism, again, nothing
          was said about the building. It proudly stood as ever with
          swastika as before.

          About ten years ago, a large effort took place to remodel the fair
          city and redevelope it. Pledging to preserve as much as the old
          as possible and still upgrade the down town an interesting
          decision was made to cover the swastika so as not to offend
          anyone... apparently... so a wooden covering was placed over it
          and today the swastika is no longer visible to the public eye!

          Now this is an interesting thing... that during the wwii, apparently
          no one seriously objected to this symbol but forty years after the
          war, someone thought it might offend?

          I think the symbol of the swastika is more misunderstood today
          than it was years ago, but obviously it has lost none of it's
          potency for all that.

          - Art
        • jla
          Nick, As far as I know, some artists did have association with mystery schools, directly or indirectly. Dante was an example of initiation of his time, it is
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 16, 2000
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            Nick,


            As far as I know, some artists did have association with mystery schools, directly or indirectly. Dante was an example of initiation of his time, it is claimed. Others like Blake were naturally clairvoyance but often undisciplined and subject to early stage visionary error (as in the case of Blake's idealistic and overdone images.) Novalis and Rembrandt were also said to have had some contact with Initiates.

            As for Swastikas: I agree. Working with symbols meditatively works much better. Try spinning with your arms out clockwise and then counter wise alternatively and feel the difference. Some people feel nauseous after spinning counterclockwise.
            Additionally, I think you hit the nail on the head: these early symbols are said to be the result of early clairvoyance or psychic visionary ability of older cultures.  Usually the story goes: when observing the spinning energies of certain chakras in the astral body one can see a clockwise or counter clockwise motion. The direction indicates either a voluntary and controlled ability or a negative or passive ability of clairvoyance.  This was slowed down in image form and thus the Swastika symbol. It can still be observed today by those who can feel or see the chakra motions (as well as other lesser eddies in the astral body).

            Nick Mandoki wrote:

            Hi all,

            Recently there was a discussion on this list regarding Swastikas, and
            why it was that clockwise/anticlockwise should inherently be regarded
            as good/evil.

            Personally I do not believe that intellectual discussion is the way
            to solve this problem, or the meaning of occult symbols in general. I
            believe that, to truly appreciate an occult symbol, it's meaning has
            to be "felt". It has to become something living within one's soul.

            Easier said than done, I know. However, taking the swastika as an
            example, this symbol probably originated in ancient India when people
            still had a natural clairvoyance. A person in that age who
            encountered the symbol would, I believe, instinctively recognise it's
            true meaning. Of course, in that age, this would all happen without
            the perceiver's concious awareness.

            Nowadays we are much more concious of what we are looking at but,
            save for the initiates, we are much less able to understand the
            symbols true meaning. To understand the symbol at an intellectual
            level is a mere shadow of the true understanding which is possible.

            On the plus side, we can hope for a time in the future when our
            clairvoyance returns, this time in full conciousness.

            Moving on a little. The other day I was reading a book about the 15th
            Century Dutch artist Hieronymous Bosch. His paintings are loaded with
            symbols - swans spitting fire, nuns with books balanced on their
            heads, mummified feet, etc. The commentary explains the meaning of
            some of these symbols. Presumably these meanings are the results of
            studies by modern day art scholars. However the book also states that
            the meaning of many of these symbols is now lost, but would have been
            easily recognizable to Bosch's contemporaries.

            I wondered why this would be ? Did all artists of that era study at
            an artists' mystery school ? Were they initiates ? Did they have a
            natural bent towards symbology, or even a clairvoyance ? Was it just
            a grand co-incidence ?

            Anybody have any ideas ?

            Nick
             


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