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Re: Recovering history and navigating the ZeitGeist

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  • carol
    Thanks for: The Amazing Warning Of Benjamin Freedman - A Jewish Defector Warns America 1-21-7 Reading that speech brought to mind the accounts that I ve read
    Message 1 of 25 , Feb 4, 2007
      Thanks for: The Amazing Warning Of Benjamin Freedman - A Jewish
      Defector Warns America 1-21-7

      Reading that speech brought to mind the accounts that I've read which
      describe circumstances surrounding some events of WW1, from the
      perspective of, well let's say, Anthros at the time.

      I am proposing that reflection be applied towards the informal
      association between the Chief of the General Staff von Moltke and
      Rudolf Steiner and the significance of this joint rapport towards
      Humanity's karmic events of the early 20th century. Contrary to
      the `popular' tendency of using these 2 individuals as scapegoats for
      Germany's defeat in the 1st WW, perhaps we should be looking at
      measuring the `Great' resistance that Moltke bore out of himself,
      against the great Ahrimanic forces which pressed forward against him
      and the world, and which eventually managed to outwit him.

      The following extracts come from LIGHT FOR THE NEW MILLENNIUM Rudolf
      Steiner's association with Helmuth and Elza von Moltke- Letters,
      Documents and After-Death Communications- Rudolf Steiner Press l997

      From Introduction by Thomas H. Meyer

      Moltke, Steiner and the true German folk Spirit

      "Inner development of culture, of faculties of the soul and the
      spirit and of a cosmopolitan attitude-these were what Steiner (and
      Moltke) saw as the principal mission of the German people. And
      Moltke, who used to carry Goethe's Faust in his pocket during
      maneouvres, had wished to place himself at the service of a Germany
      with such aims. An impulse of this kind towards inner development
      lay behind the words that Steiner wrote to Moltke in November
      l915: `This destiny of the German people is bound up with the deepest
      and most noble aims of human development.'

      Moltke, at any rate, was well aware of the dangers threatening a
      further real ascent of the German people, when he wrote to his wife
      in 1904:'The German people as a whole is a pathetic society. Full of
      politicians in ivory towers, lacking any trace of magnanimity, petty,
      mean, full of envy and resentment, hateful and myopic-one can only
      feel sorry for it. Everywhere tings are torn down, soiled, there is
      slander and lies, and all in the guise of virtuous moral outrage.
      Hypocrisy wherever you look, mean-minded egotism and crass
      materialism. Ideals no longer have any validity, everything is outer
      semblance. Whatever still stands is torn down, everyone seeks to
      raise only himself, and when the great heap of ruins is complete, the
      judgment will fall upon us.'

      And Steiner once said: `If the German individual manages to truly
      grasp the spirit, he is a blessing for the world: if he does not, he
      is the world's scourge.'

      Moltke of all people was the man to feel deeply the truth of such
      words.



      From The Sauerwein Interview with Rudolf Steiner for Le Matin about
      the Events that led to the First World War, October l921

      `You know that if one were to believe your opponents, the Chief of
      the General Staff first lost his head and after that the Battle of
      the Marne through your involvement."….

      The fear of the truth

      When I asked him directly about General von Moltke he directed his
      intense gaze at me, his face lined with the traits of forty years of
      the most arduous spiritual striving.

      `What you are saying to me does not surprise me. There are people
      who are doing their utmost to drive me out of Germany or possibly
      even out of Switzerland. There are many different reasons for these
      attacks. But insofar as they are aimed at my relationship with
      Moltke, they have a very definite purpose. They are directed at
      preventing the publication of some notes Moltke wrote down before his
      death for his family and whose publication in book form I intended to
      arrange in agreement with Frau von Moltke.

      `These memoirs were due to be published in 1919. Immediately before
      their publication I was visited by a personality (Hans Adolf von
      Moltke) who was in charge of the diplomatic representation of Prussia
      in Stuttgart: he came to tell me that this publication was impossible
      ant that it would not be wanted in Berlin. Later a general (General
      von Dommes) came to see me who had occupied various posts near
      General von Moltke and Kaiser Wilhelm 11 and now presented the same
      arguments to me. I protested against this and wanted to ignore
      them. I thought that I might turn to Count Brockdorff-Rantzau who
      was present in Versailles at that time; but nothing could be done.
      My efforts remained unsuccessful for the further reason that at the
      same time Frau von Moltke was presented with arguments she was not
      ale to ignore.

      `Why those fears? These memoirs are definitely not a accusation of
      the Kaiser's government. But it can be understood from them, which
      is possibly worse, that the government of the Reich was in a state of
      total confusion and that its leadership was incomprehensibly
      frivolous and ignorant. Those responsible are adequately described
      by a sentence I have written in my preface: "It was not what they did
      that led to disaster, but rather the whole nature of their
      personalities".

      `I may add that this was occasioned by the peculiar circumstances
      which brought it about that n the end the total responsibility for
      crucial decisions came to lie on one man, the Chief of the General
      Staff, who felt compelled as a result to fulfil his military duty
      because politics had reached a nadir. I never discussed military or
      political issues with Moltke before his resignation. It was ol
      later, when he was seriously ill, that he naturally spoke candidly
      about all these matters to me, and as this will interest you, I will
      tell you what he himself told me and what can also be read in his
      unpublished memoirs.

      `At the end of June l914, Moltke, who had been Chief of the General
      Stff since l905 (1 January1906), went to Karlsbad for his health. Up
      to the time of is death he knew nothing about a Potsdam council
      meeting on 5 or 6 July. He did not get back to Berlin, wigh his
      health restored , until after the ultimatum to Serbia. After his
      return, he said, he was firmly convinced that Russia would attack.
      He clearly anticipated the tragic development which mattes were going
      to assume; that is to say he believed that France and England were
      going to take part in the world conflict… the plan of the German
      General staff in its main lines had been laid down a long time
      previously. It had been devised by von Schlieffen, Moltke's
      predecessor..

      However, von Moltke had altered his predecessor's plan in one
      important respect. Whereas schlieffen had mapped out a simultaneous
      march through Belgiu and Holland, Moltke had given up the idea of
      going through Holland in order to give Germany a chance to breathe in
      the case of a blockade.

      When Moltke arrived at the palace on 31 July he found himself in the
      midst of utterly confused people. He had the impression, he said that
      he had to make a decision all on his own. The Kaiser did not sign
      the mobilization order on that day, an order which, in Germany, is
      tantamount to a declaration of war, for as soon as such an order is
      given, everything, including he first military operation, takes place
      at fixed hours, automatically and inexorably. William 11 contented
      himself for the day with declaring a "state of danger of war". The
      next day, Saturday, 1 August, at 4 p.m. he had Moltke summoned again,
      and during the next six hours the following drama unfolded.

      `Moltke finds the Kaiser in company with Betman-Hollweg, whose knees
      were literally shaking, the Mimister of War von Falkenhayn, General
      von Plessen, Lyncker and some others. The Daise expresses himself
      vigorously against the Chief of the Genera Staff's plan. He has, he
      declares, received very good news from England. England would not
      only remain neutral-it was King George who had informed him-but she
      would even restrain France fro taking part in the war. Under these
      conditions it was logical to hurl the whole army against Russia. No,
      Moltke replied, the plan must be executed in East and West just as it
      was conceived if we were not to cause a horrendous disaster..

      The technical reasons

      `Moltke is not moved by the objections raised, he refuses to change
      anything… He does not believe the English dispatches, and holding in
      his hand the mobilization order which has just been signed, he is
      dismissed, leaving behind the others in a state of toal confusion…On
      the way form the palace to the General Headquarters his motor car is
      overtaken by another from the palace. Moltke is summoned back to the
      Kaiser… He shows his Chief of the General Staff a dispatch from
      England He sees in the dispatch positive assurances that the
      conflict will be limited to the East and that England and France will
      be neutral. "The army must immediately be given orders not to
      proceed in the West", he concludes. Moltke replies that one must not
      subject an army to a series of orders and counter-orders. Then the
      Kaiser, with Moltke standing by, turns to the aide-de-camp (Colonel
      von Tappen) and gives him orders to immediately convey to the command
      of the 16th Division in Trier the order not to invade Luxembourg.
      Moltke goes home. Deeply shaken, for he envisages that the greatest
      catastrophe will ensue from such measures, he sits down at his table.
      He declares that he cannot make the countermanding order needed to
      carry out the Kaiser's telephone order. This order is submitted to
      him for his signature by an aide-de-camp. He refuses to sign it and
      pushes the document away. Until eleven o'clock at night he remains
      sitting there I a state of dazed exhaustion in spite of having
      returned I good health from Carlsbad. At eleven o'clock there is a
      knock on his door. The Kaiser wants him back at the palace… Wilhelm
      11 puts on his dressing-gown and says: 'Everything has changed. A
      disaster is pending. The King of England has just stated in a new
      dispatch that he had been misunderstood, and that he could not
      enter, either in his name or in France's, into any commitment
      whatsoever.' The Kaiser ends by saying to Moltke:' Now you may do as
      you wish.' Now the war begins.

      Ominous signs

      `During the month of August, I saw General von Moltke only once, on
      27 August in Koblenz. Our conversation was about purely human
      concerns. The German army was still advancing victoriously. There
      was no reason either to speak about what had not yet come to pass.
      The battle of the Marne took place later. I had not seen Moltke
      again up to that time. It took place under conditions which were
      bound to deeply shake Moltke's expectations. In manoeuvres he had
      several times carried out a cautious advance on the right wing which
      might be used for an advance against Paris. Three times Kluck, who
      had the supreme command over the right wing, advanced too fast.
      Every time Moltke said to him: "If in real operations you advance as
      fast as this we shall lose the war." When Kluck's army was about to
      be surrounded Moltke was struck with a terrifying premonition:
      Germany might have lost the war. This to me appears to be an
      important part of the `Psychology" of the war's progress. When von
      Moltke returned to headquarters on 13 September he gave the
      impression of a deeply shaken man. The people around the Kaiser
      considered him sick. From that time, it was in reality Falkenhayn
      who commanded the army without having the official title. Later,
      when Moltke was confined to his be, Wilhelm11 came to pay him a
      visit. "Is it still I," he asked the Kaiser, "who am conducting
      operations?" "I believe indeed that it is you," Wilhelm 11
      replied. So for weeks the Kaiser did not even know who was the true
      commander of his troops.

      `Here is another illustration of the opinion that was entertained of
      Wilhelm 11 by his own entourage. One day, when von Moltke was
      describing to me the feelings of deep suffering he experienced in
      going back through Belgium after the fall of Antwerp, I spoke to him
      for the first time of the plan of attack by way of Belgium. "How did
      it happen," I asked him, "that a Minister of War could bring himself
      to say at the Reichstag that there had never been a plan for invading
      Belgium?" "This Minister," Moltke replied, "did not know my plan,
      but the Chancellor was familiar with it." "And the Kaiser?" "Never on
      my life," said von Moltke. "He is too much given to talking and too
      indiscreet. He would have told the whole world about it!"'
    • holderlin66
      The German Empire was founded at a time when these needs were converging on mankind. Its administrators did not understand the need for setting the Empire s
      Message 2 of 25 , Feb 4, 2007
        "The German Empire was founded at a time when these needs were
        converging on mankind. Its administrators did not understand the
        need for setting the Empire's mission accordingly. A view to these
        necessities would not only have given the Empire the correct inner
        structure; it would also have lent justification to its foreign
        policy. The German people could have lived together with the non-
        German peoples through such a policy.

        "Insight should now mature from the calamity. One should develop a
        will for the best possible social organism. Not a Germany which no
        longer exists should face the world, but a spiritual, a political
        and an economic system should propose to deal as autonomous
        delegations, through their representatives, with those who crushed
        that Germany which became an impossible social structure due to the
        confusion of its three systems.

        "One can anticipate the experts who object to the complexity of
        these suggestions and find it uncomfortable even to think about
        three systems cooperating with each other, because they wish to know
        nothing of the real requirements of life and would structure
        everything according to the comfortable requirements of their
        thinking. This must become clear to them: either people will
        accommodate their thinking to the requirements of reality, or they
        will have learned nothing from the calamity and will cause
        innumerable new ones to occur in the future."

        http://wn.rsarchive.org/Books/GA023/English/SCR2001/GA023_appendix.ht
        ml

        Rudolf Steiner
      • carol
        Knowing oneself to be at one with the willing of the spiritual world gives one s soul the power of certainty in the course of one s life, however
        Message 3 of 25 , Feb 4, 2007
          "Knowing oneself to be at one with the willing of the spiritual world
          gives one's soul the power of certainty in the course of one's life,
          however disconcertingly the events of outer life may be raging around
          the vessel of one's life." RS in a personal letter to von Moltke


          More spirit wisdom from Letters and Verses from Rudolf Steiner; Light
          For The New Millennium, Rudolf Steiner's association with Helmuth
          and Eliza von Moltke, Letters, Documents and After-Death
          Communications



          Rudolf Steiner to Helmuth von Moltke Dornach, (9 February 1915)

          I would like to tell His Excellency in a few sentences what has been
          placed before my soul while thinking of you in spirit, from that side
          of the spiritual world known to you:

          `Human beings work in the world through their outer deeds in the
          ordinary course of life; but when something spiritual is to be
          realized through physical happenings significant things may be
          achieved when a human being not only performs his deeds but connects
          himself with the course of events in such a way that he bears
          patiently what appeared to him hard to bear, and for which he needs
          to overcome himself. This is what you have rightly achieved. It is
          very positive that things have not reached a state detachment where
          one's own will would have been in opposition to what was willed by
          the outer world; that in fact everything has been done not to drive
          this detachment beyond what was effected from the other side. Such
          deeds are deeds of the soul life, and in that they are crucial forces
          for helping to bring about a favorable outcome. It is significant
          that a man exists who is willing to bring personal sacrifices to the
          true love of the cause, who knows himself connected with the cause I
          such a way that he willingly bears personal suffering for reason of
          serving the spirit. In such a mood of soul the forces of the spirit
          can work; and theses must work for things to take a favorable turn.
          The guiding powers of the spirit are able to gather forces in this
          personality during time of an apparent distance from the events, and
          these forces will be need in the time before us.'

          I have put these words in inverted commas for a good reason. There
          is nothing in these sentences which I have just thought up. These
          intuitions are rather an affirmation that I may speak to His
          Excellency as I have indeed done in these times which have afforded
          you such hard trials. My thoughts often go towards you and then to
          those sources of the spiritual life which shape the direction of
          earthly events, and then I may always bring back the satisfying
          vision of your connection with the spiritual world. May you feel
          with your whole being how what has been brought about through you is
          in unison with the spiritual world, and may you recognize in the
          consciousness of this unison the inner spiritual support which is
          infinitely more secure than any outer supports man might find for his
          existence. Knowing oneself to be at one with the willing of the
          spiritual world gives one's soul the power of certainty in the course
          of one's life, however disconcertingly the events of outer life may
          be raging around the vessel of one's life. I know for sure that you
          may experience this; may it spread throughout your soul and fill it
          with utter clarity. Such is the way in which I often think of you,
          Excellency, and I will continue to do so as your devoted
          R. St.

          Notes for Helmuth von Moltke (Dornach, 26 May 1915)

          Notwithstanding all that is happening outwardly, inwardly everything
          has remained as I have always described it to you. Keeping up one's
          courage, mastering the difficulties, this is what needs to be done
          without fail. With respect to this, new spiritual experiences
          confirm the earlier ones. And if the will is quietly strengthened
          and upheld it will be possible to achieve what has to be achieved.
          Our trust in the world's spiritual guidance wil only grow strong
          enough if it is hardened and steeled by experiences in the physical
          world which, if they were merely taken to be such physical
          experiences, might make us faint-hearted. After all, trust in what s
          spiritual demands that we nurture t whatever may be happening in the
          physical world. If I were to write down today what has been revealed
          to me spiritually in the time since we met the description would not
          look very different from what has been given earlier. And actually
          it is this very fact which makes it so significant, so hopeful.
          There are certain details which are new but as far as the general
          thrust is concerned nothing has changed. Therefore it is necessary
          to hold fast to what has been understood to be the right course so
          far.

          What is experienced in the satisfaction of the physical world as such
          has run its course, has fulfilled its task, what is suffered has an
          inherent causal power; it leads beyond itself. This is not altered
          by the fact that suffering, too has its causes. It is, as it were,
          the seed of that light which wants to be borne out of darkness. And
          this light really does continue to appear in the way it did in all
          those difficult times of suffering in the past. And all the
          spiritual beings of which we have spoken keep on pointing to this
          light, signifying that in it solace and strength and peace are to be
          found.

          The Spirit of the German people is with this light and whatever this
          Spirit places within the gleam of this light will eventually find the
          path. This spirit remains the Spirit with his torch raised, and
          those who were around him continue to be around him and whoever is
          protected by him is well protected These are the spiritual facts of
          which we have often spoken; and what I have been allowed to know
          today serves to confirm my seein of these facts.
        • holderlin66
          For all those have so easily got lost in what is the point of reviewing and recovering history, here is the point. The point is that the precise star rhythm
          Message 4 of 25 , Feb 4, 2007
            For all those have so easily got lost in what is the point of
            reviewing and recovering history, here is the point. The point is
            that the precise star rhythm pattern that brought about the
            crescendo of events that shattered the 20th century appeared and
            restarted their attack on the Grail history and Grail Sciences of
            the 20th century by the year 1997 and are still crushingly striding
            forward where we stand today in the current 2007. The 21st century
            has been hijacked so far against the impulses of Mankind!

            Therefore when we learn our lessons, when we look at current events,
            we are being taught lessons that were also brought suddenly and
            surprisingly to Europe. But here in the 21st century we must use
            these lessons and thank souls like George Orwell and Steiner and all
            those who have faced these hard trials and gleaned from them current
            Michael Intelligence lessons. It isn't that we can wish it were
            otherwise, the point is to see what it is and send it back out of
            the dark corners where it lurks in humans wills. To diagnose and
            remove it before it causes terrible, terrible chaos again.

            Magnificent, giant Jupiter's swath, not only stirs the ethers but
            the events that have produced the catastrophic plunge into the
            middle east and Iraq, Iran, Syria...come from the super cell of
            sorathian will intent, as powerful as streaming unconscious will
            forces that come into the stagnating and ruptured heart of Dick
            Cheney. His heart is a ruptured vessel that cannot contain and
            refuses to contain and actively works against the building of the
            new etheric heart we have discussed here. But his darkened will
            along with those in Israel are moving unconsiously in a symphony of
            dark orchestrated intent that is motivated by black lodges to
            suffocate humanities relation to The Etheric Christ Sun. Suffocate
            it and bury it in trivia or catastrophe.

            The vast super-cell of a vast net of beings as powerful as a group
            soul or Archai intent, has picked up the lazy and thoughtless region
            of the American, British and Israel souls to repeat and plunge
            humanity into a recapitualation of black lodge victories going back
            to Kaspar Hauser. The stars have swept right around again to this
            spot and on this spot currently in 2007, the unconscious will-
            intelligence of subsensible beings have cunningly entered the
            corrupt will and materialistic will forces of humanity again...and
            just like Germany, America is blind to these powerful overshadowing
            resurging victories of the black lodges as they reassert themselves.

            If we were but conscious of the return pattern of the stars or that
            the history of 20th century Grail Europe including physics science
            of the soul and spirit out of Munich, that Steiner was there to
            offer, were forced back to the humble and subdued Christmas
            Foundation and the Foundation Stone, we might be able to laugh these
            idiots back into their dark Orwellian corners. A Grail Science and a
            Grail culture has its only hot point out of those souls who grasp
            the reality of Michael culture and the current Michael Zeitgeist
            goals.

            To piece together the series of standard assassinations, spin,
            numbing of the entire German folk and now America, Britain and
            Israel, into the same schemes and the same delusions as 1914, we
            might be able to hold onto the Grail Sciences history before it is
            once more plunged into a whole new wave of world wide chaos and is
            rewritten in the usual Orwellian fashion and lost. Lost like today
            to the uneducated and scattered thought realm who have never heard
            or couldn't even understand as the Christmas Conference or The
            Foundation Stone. Just as today any truth about events in America is
            being recast to blunt the education of our children and the future
            so they won't see how sound asleep and what imbeciles we were that
            we couldn't detox our will impulses and our cognition from those who
            represent everything that is anti-man and anti-logos.

            Steiner brought;

            "The German people believed that its imperial structure, erected
            half a century ago, would last for an unlimited time. In August
            1914, it felt that the imminent catastrophe of war would prove this
            structure invincible. Today, only its ruins are left. After such an
            experience retrospection is in order, for this experience has proved
            the opinions of half a century, especially the dominant thoughts of
            the war years, to be tragically erroneous. What are the reasons
            behind this erroneous thinking? This question must induce
            retrospection in the minds of the German people. Its potentiality
            for life depends on whether the strength exists for this kind of
            self-examination. Its future depends on whether it can earnestly ask
            the following question: how did we fall into error? If the German
            people asks itself this question today, it will realize that it
            established an Empire half a century ago, but omitted to assign to
            this Empire the mission which corresponds to the inner essence of
            its people."

            "... `the decisive events in Berlin'. The memoirs of General Helmuth
            von Moltke, Chief of the German General Staff at the outbreak of the
            war, were ready for publication in May 1919. Von Moltke describes
            the German Government's attitude at that time, especially on 31 July
            and 1 August 1914: `The atmosphere grew steadily more tense and I
            was completely alone.' Then he was told by the Kaiser, `So now you
            can do whatever you want.'

            "Rudolf Steiner wrote in a commentary: `So there it was: the Chief
            of the General Staff stood completely alone. Due to the fact that
            German policy had reached the zero-point, Europe's destiny on 31
            July and 1 August rested in the hands of a man who was obliged to do
            his military duty.' (Vorbemerkungen zu Die Schuld am Krieg,
            Betrachtungen und Erinnerungen des Generalstabschefs H. von Moltke.)
            Aufsätze über die Dreigliederung des Sozialen Organismus.
            This `military duty' involved implementing the German army's
            predetermined war-plan, prepared by von Moltke's predecessor General
            Schlieffen, which provided for the domination of France before
            invading Russia. France was to be attacked through Belgium and
            Holland. Von Moltke modified the plan to the extent that Holland was
            omitted.

            "His memoirs were suppressed in 1919, but Rudolf Steiner, who was
            personally acquainted with him, was familiar with their contents. In
            an interview which appeared in the French newspaper Le Matin in
            October 1921, Steiner said that the memoirs should have been
            published in 1919, but they were suppressed because of fear on the
            part of the authorities. `Why this fear? These memoirs are in no way
            an accusation against the imperial government. Something else is
            involved, which is perhaps even worse: that this imperial government
            found itself in a state of complete confusion and under an
            incredibly frivolous and ignorant leadership.' Jules Sauerman's
            interview with Dr. Rudolf Steiner on the unpublished memoirs of the
            late Chief of the German General Staff von Moltke.

            "What About Parallels Between 1914 (WWI) and 1997?

            "The scary thing about this 83-year precise "Jupiter Return," where
            generalized historical events may be repeating themselves, is that
            we are fast approaching 1997. In that year, we will not only have a
            repeat of the Jupiter-Uranus conjunction in early Aquarius from
            March 3-4, 1914 (the date in 1997 for this Jupiter-Uranus union will
            be February 15-16), but Jupiter--throughout 1997--will be recrossing
            his steps (to the degree and to the day) from 1914. It was during
            1914 that World War I began--particularly with the assassination of
            the Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria-Hungary on June 28, 1914 (by
            the way, I am writing this story on June 28, 1995) and the "Guns of
            August," the nightmarish launching of war in Europe in early August
            1914. In June 1997, Jupiter at 22 Aquarius will be stationing
            retrograde right where he stationed in June 1914 and, of course, on
            the 83rd anniversary of the assassination of the Archduke--June 28,
            1997--Jupiter will be at 21+ Aquarius (exactly where Jupiter was on
            June 28, 1914)! Keep in mind that the beginning of World War I in
            1914 was actually the birth of both world wars. World War II came
            about because the peace treaty imposed upon Germany in November 1918
            was reviled by militaristic Germans and the Nazis eventually broke
            every agreement within that peace treaty in their efforts to
            reconquer Europe."
          • holderlin66
            The Project for the New American Disaster by Tom Chartier http://www.lewrockwell.com/chartier/chartier60.html holderlin brought: Not only is this not a war
            Message 5 of 25 , Feb 5, 2007
              The Project for the New American Disaster
              by Tom Chartier

              http://www.lewrockwell.com/chartier/chartier60.html

              holderlin brought:

              "Not only is this not a war and it is based on the roots of
              disrupting the Logos from achieving the goal of intimacy of human
              thinking, it is a poltical Sorathian surge as outlined and
              anticipated by Steiner's Anthroposophy and nailed dead clear as a
              train wreck, as the arrival of The PNAC, Project for a New Ahrimanic
              Century dead on in 1997. It follows in the rhythm pattern of 1913/14
              dawn of WW I etc..etc...picking up the pattern and impress of the
              planets. This indirect and direct attack through torture against the
              Logos in Man and the Michael Nation is brought in order to derail
              humanity from building the faculties to approach the Angelic world
              through our heart thinking."

              Steiner brought;

              "The German people believed that its imperial structure, erected
              half a century ago, would last for an unlimited time. In August
              1914, it felt that the imminent catastrophe of war would prove this
              structure invincible. Today, only its ruins are left. After such an
              experience retrospection is in order, for this experience has
              proved the opinions of half a century, especially the dominant
              thoughts of the war years, to be tragically erroneous. What are the
              reasons behind this erroneous thinking? This question must induce
              retrospection in the minds of the German people. Its potentiality
              for life depends on whether the strength exists for this kind of
              self-examination. Its future depends on whether it can earnestly
              ask the following question: how did we fall into error? If the
              German people asks itself this question today, it will realize that
              it established an Empire half a century ago, but omitted to assign
              to this Empire the mission which corresponds to the inner essence of
              its people."

              The Michael School can see the intimate recapitulations of strong
              negative will forces that are turned back at us again, you might say
              focused and reflected, rayed back into the unconscious human will
              riding on the rhythm of the sorathian surge predicted out of 1998.

              If, as Steiner brought, we were conscious or the German people were
              conscious of their cultural mission....calamity, catastrophe and
              absorbing the dark forces into our will stream, could never have
              happened if we had time stamped our motives with human conscience
              and seen ourselves as the spiritual family and spiritual beings that
              we are. Compare where the Intellectual Soul attempts to come to
              grips with itself.

              "During the summer of 1924 a former German Army corporal languished
              in relative luxury in Landsberg Prison. With time on his hands he
              dictated a turgid book of twisted thoughts to one of his loyal
              cronies. With a gift for oratory, the prisoner had risen to leader
              of a fledgling political party. An idealistically naïve and inept
              attempt to overthrow the struggling government by force had failed,
              landing the leader behind bars.

              Volume One of the book was first printed in the autumn of 1925 and
              initially sold a meager 9,473 copies. Sales dropped further to only
              3,015 by 1928. Even when sales did increase, the book was not often
              read by those who bought it. It was a prerequisite display
              of "political correctness" to be placed in view on the mantle. The
              book laid out very specifically a plan for the forceful expansion
              towards more "living space" into Eastern Europe coupled with rabid
              racism so severe it called for the extermination of an entire race
              of people. The book was titled Mein Kampf – My Struggle in English.

              One wonders, had German citizens bothered to read the book and give
              it serious thought, would Germany and the world have been spared
              unparalleled disaster?

              WW II, its cause and its carnage, is now alive only in the pages of
              history books. Offering accounts that are unimaginable to and thus
              misunderstood by new generations, such works of history are
              selectively remembered by governments with their own modern agendas.
              For most people today, the complex causes of WW II have been reduced
              to the most simplistic terms of good versus evil. It is never that
              simple.

              The world is six years into a new century. Unfortunately, the new
              century has not handed the world a clean slate with which to start
              civilization over again. Sadly, old men do not forget. Last
              century's grudges and feuds are alive and well in this century. With
              angry intolerance and dreams of conquest, mankind continues to grab
              at empire.

              Enter the Project For The New American Century.

              Well known to those who actively follow national and world
              developments, PNAC along with other think tanks governing national
              policy such as The American Enterprise Institute, operate beyond the
              view of the average American who listens to talk-radio on the way to
              work. And yet such think tanks exert an enormous influence and power
              over the future of the United States and with it mankind. Woe to
              those who do not see through the rationale and revisionist history
              used by these think tanks to justify their agenda.

              In its Statement of Principles, dated June 3, 1997, The Project for
              the New American Century spelled out its philosophy and agenda. For
              those who bothered to read it, little doubt was left concerning what
              was in store for the 21st century. The PNAC Statement is reprinted
              in its entirety below with comments.

              "American foreign and defense policy is adrift. Conservatives have
              criticized the incoherent policies of the Clinton Administration.
              They have also resisted isolationist impulses from within their own
              ranks. But conservatives have not confidently advanced a strategic
              vision of America's role in the world. They have not set forth
              guiding principles for American foreign policy. They have allowed
              differences over tactics to obscure potential agreement on strategic
              objectives. And they have not fought for a defense budget that would
              maintain American security and advance American interests in the new
              century.

              We aim to change this. We aim to make the case and rally support for
              American global leadership."

              Although touting itself as a voice of "conservatism," PNAC evidences
              little genuine conservative philosophy. Lord Salisbury warned of
              this very thing. Paul Smith writes: "Salisbury had little taste for
              colonization: he could see that all too often it was a convenient
              pretext for the robbery of the weak, and he was doubtful whether the
              advantages it brought offset the heavy expense and commitment
              incurred."

              "Radical" would be a more apt description for PNAC policies. In the
              military jargon of "strategy" and "tactics," a call is made
              for "American global leadership." What exactly are these "American
              interests" that PNAC wants to "advance"?

              The Statement of Principles continues:

              "As the 20th century draws to a close, the United States stands as
              the world's preeminent power. Having led the West to victory in the
              Cold War, America faces an opportunity and a challenge: Does the
              United States have the vision to build upon the achievements of past
              decades? Does the United States have the resolve to shape a new
              century favorable to American principles and interests?

              In short, with the break up of the U.S.S.R. there is no country
              strong enough to stop the U.S., therefore we must strike now… while
              the iron is hot.

              We are in danger of squandering the opportunity and failing the
              challenge. We are living off the capital – both the military
              investments and the foreign policy achievements – built up by past
              administrations. Cuts in foreign affairs and defense spending,
              inattention to the tools of statecraft, and inconstant leadership
              are making it increasingly difficult to sustain American influence
              around the world. And the promise of short-term commercial benefits
              threatens to override strategic considerations. As a consequence, we
              are jeopardizing the nation's ability to meet present threats and to
              deal with potentially greater challenges that lie ahead. We seem to
              have forgotten the essential elements of the Reagan Administration's
              success: a military that is strong and ready to meet both present
              and future challenges; a foreign policy that boldly and purposefully
              promotes American principles abroad; and national leadership that
              accepts the United States' global responsibilities."

              Did the United States under president Reagan actually lead the West
              to victory in the Cold War? Or did Reagan's forceful policies and
              rearmament combine with the implosion of the U.S.S.R.'s failed
              economy as the Russians lost their ill-advised war in Afghanistan?

              Does the U.S. have decades of international achievements on which to
              build and of which to boast? WW I was fought to a standstill with
              the U.S. participating in the final year, 1918. In WW II, Nazi
              Germany suffered greatly by the perpetual British and U.S. aerial
              bombardment; however, it was the onslaught of the Russian Red Army
              that dealt National Socialism the deathblow. Through attrition of
              resources, tiny Imperial Japan's 1941 aggression against the U.S.
              never had a chance against the expanse of America.

              How about Korea? Vietnam? Are these achievements of past decades to
              build upon in a quest for a New American Century? And don't forget
              America's achievements in the little third world. The U.S. has been
              busy inside countries of no threat to, and with no possibility of
              defense against the mighty U.S. war machine. As stated by AEI Neocon
              Michael Ledeen: "Every ten years or so, the United States needs to
              pick up some small crappy little country and throw it against the
              wall, just to show the world we mean business."

              Are these policies something to boast of and build upon
              as "successes?"

              While feeding their own paranoia, the "thinkers" at PNAC are
              rationalizing their own delusions of grandeur.

              "Of course, the United States must be prudent in how it exercises
              its power. But we cannot safely avoid the responsibilities of global
              leadership or the costs that are associated with its exercise.
              America has a vital role in maintaining peace and security in
              Europe, Asia, and the Middle East. If we shirk our responsibilities,
              we invite challenges to our fundamental interests. The history of
              the 20th century should have taught us that it is important to shape
              circumstances before crises emerge, and to meet threats before they
              become dire. The history of this century should have taught us to
              embrace the cause of American leadership."

              "Prudent" in the exercise of power? Since when? How can any sentient
              being consider Michael Ledeen's
              statement "prudent?" "Peace?" "Security?" Where? In the Middle East?
              This is merely a smoke screen of "morality."

              What is important in this passage is the carefully worded hint of
              preventive war. To hell with "intelligence" and concrete proof,
              we'll make that up as we go along. The ends justify the means. It is
              America's "fundamental interests," and claims to the world's
              remaining oil supplies, which must be protected. Morality does not
              enter into it.

              "Our aim is to remind Americans of these lessons and to draw their
              consequences for today. Here are four consequences:

              we need to increase defense spending significantly if we are to
              carry out our global responsibilities today and modernize our armed
              forces for the future;
              we need to strengthen our ties to democratic allies and to challenge
              regimes hostile to our interests and values;
              we need to promote the cause of political and economic freedom
              abroad;
              we need to accept responsibility for America's unique role in
              preserving and extending an international order friendly to our
              security, our prosperity, and our principles."
              These are not "consequences." These are statements rationalizing
              conquest through force.

              Increase defense spending? The United States spends billions more
              on "defense" than is needed to defend her borders. The United States
              is protected both to the east and west by vast oceans and has non-
              hostile neighbors to the north and south. No nation in the world
              could seriously contemplate an invasion of U.S. borders as a matter
              of foreign policy. The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 were
              not a militaristic act of a hostile state but a brutal terrorist
              attack of a privately funded, fringe group of radicals scorned and
              feared by many of the Middle Eastern nations. It was not an
              invasion. It was not a state-sponsored act of war.

              What PNAC actually means is: increase "military spending for
              offense" and for the benefit of the military industrial complex in
              order to serve aggressive pursuit of a bigger empire.

              Challenge hostile regimes? In other words, destroy nations that do
              not kowtow to our demands. The mighty U.S. will threaten to bomb
              them back into the Stone Age to show we mean business.

              Promote political and economic freedom abroad? Is this best
              accomplished at the point of a gun? What about political and
              economic freedom at home? Must America's Constitution and civil
              liberties be discarded in the New American Century? Evidently so.

              Accept responsibility for what? Creating a Militaristic Empire for
              the power hungry neoconservatives? The United States is responsible
              for the United States, not for the world. The U.S. is not the global
              guardian. Last I heard, the United Nations was supposed to fill that
              role.

              "Such a Reaganite policy of military strength and moral clarity may
              not be fashionable today. But it is necessary if the United States
              is to build on the successes of this past century and to ensure our
              security and our greatness in the next."

              No doubt, PNAC's Statement of Principles is attractive to those
              Americans who love to be number one and care little how they get
              there.

              The Greatness of America is a delusional falsehood which has been
              fostered by our schools, movies, television and newspapers. America
              and the PNAC have bloated egos claiming to be the saviors of the
              world. Was 9/11 evidence that the world may not share this view? To
              the eyes of the world community, we are the bullies to be feared…
              and hated. "Such a Reaganite policy of military strength and moral
              clarity" may have become fashionable with PNAC thugs but it lacks
              not simply "moral clarity" but morals entirely. It is nothing more
              than Empire building madness. America's white hat is splattered in
              blood.

              Note the signatories. Many are familiar names within the current
              Democratic Dictatorship of secrecy and privilege. And this list is
              only a fraction of the Neocons driving towards the disaster of the
              New American Century.

              Elliott Abrams, Gary Bauer, William J. Bennett, Jeb Bush, Dick
              Cheney, Eliot A. Cohen, Midge Decter, Paula Dobriansky, Steve
              Forbes, Aaron Friedberg, Francis Fukuyama, Frank Gaffney, Fred C.
              Ikle, Donald Kagan, Zalmay Khalilzad, I. Lewis Libby, Norman
              Podhoretz, Dan Quayle, Peter W. Rodman, Stephen P. Rosen, Henry S.
              Rowen, Donald Rumsfeld, Vin Weber, George Weigel, Paul Wolfowitz

              One member of PNAC, whose name is not shown on this list, is PNAC
              chairman and co-founder William Kristol. Kristol has just joined
              Time magazine as a columnist. About Kristol one might quote Ayn
              Rand's description of: "a journalist who wrote that it is proper and
              moral to use compulsion 'for a good cause,' who believed that he had
              the right to unleash physical force upon others – to wreck lives,
              throttle ambitions, strangle desires, violate convictions, to
              imprison, to despoil, to murder – for the sake of whatever he chose
              to consider as his idea of 'a good cause,' …since he …relied solely
              on his own 'good intentions' and on the power of a gun." [Ayn Rand,
              ATLAS SHRUGGED, Part II "Either-Or," Chapter VII "The Moratorium on
              Brains," p 605]

              In late August of 1939, with Austria annexed to Germany and
              Czechoslovakia occupied by the Third Reich, one "only had to look at
              a map to see who was next, Poland." An attack by fake Polish
              soldiers on a German radio station in Gleiwitz was staged by the
              German S.S. In retaliation, Germany's blitzkrieg poured across the
              border into Poland on September 1st, 1939. It was the opening day of
              WW II.

              Early victories were impressive. Six years later, Germany lay in
              ruins.

              Vigilance could have prevented WW II. Germany failed to understand
              the message of Mein Kampf. Germany could have taken action to
              prevent its own destruction. Today, the most aggressive nation in
              the world, the United States of America, is building up military
              forces around another "crappy little country," Iran. Under the guise
              of spreading peace, security, freedom and democracy the U.S.
              blitzkrieg of Iran is almost certain.

              The policies of PNAC threaten endless war in a savage re-shaping of
              a fearful world.

              The Project for the New American Century issued a warning to America
              and the world on June 3, 1997. All one had to do was read it and to
              look at the map. God help us all."
            • holderlin66
              R.S. The arrogance and superciliousness of those who imagine themselves to be practical, but whose practicality is the disguised narrow-mindedness which has
              Message 6 of 25 , Feb 5, 2007
                R.S.

                "The arrogance and superciliousness
                of those who imagine themselves to be practical, but whose
                practicality is the disguised narrow-mindedness which has in fact
                induced the calamity, must cease. Attention should be paid to what
                those who are decried as idealists, but who in reality are the
                practical ones, have to say about the evolutionary needs of modern
                times."

                Bradford comments on the Consciousness Soul standpoint;

                The stars in meaningful justification return to sender all those
                unconscious impulses that truly fail to awaken the keys that unlock
                our human mystery. It isn't merely what goes around comes around,
                but rather what was failed to be understood, learned or digested
                will continue to drag us into ever deeper and deeper unconscious
                morasses.The stars and the cosmos return to sender, unconscious will
                forces that are returned for a redo, a redux, marked: failed to
                learn the lessons of why we sit in this cosmos in the first place.

                In this instance of Time study, I am not referring to how individual
                lessons are redone and remade by making an entirely new incarnation
                blueprint to correct Karmic errors. In this instance we are
                following the nearer generational lessons that the immediate planets
                and the immediate stars return to us, that humanity failed to use
                and digest consciously to unlock the cosmic riddle.

                Now what do we mean? We mean that our lack of technical curiosity,
                our lack of objective scientific interest in how these mighty
                wonders have unlocked the mystery of the Christ and achieved such
                mighty results, have very much to do with our serious
                considerations, or complete lack of serious considerations, of how
                Zarathustra, after great efforts, achieved the ability to emancipate
                and offer a highly developed, independent model of his own human
                etheric body to students. Technically we have to bring into our
                consciousness an understanding for the amazing Formative Field
                etheric forces that levitate plants upwards, bear fruit, seed,
                flower, disperse, wither, die -- operate in more complexity in
                animals and achieve the height of complexity in the working man.

                Obviously it meant that Zarathustra became highly familiar with the
                etheric forces of the plant, the group etheric forces that model and
                shape breeds and animals and the complex physics of the human
                etheric body. This was part of Zarathustra's schooling. The
                schooling that Zarathustra integrated again and again through his
                many reincarnations into a language field, where Zarathustra could
                unfold and digest his insights into the objectivity of the etheric
                body achieved RESULTS!

                Where Zarathustra grasped Angel, Archangel and Archai and in each
                scientific field Zarathustra excelled and moved along and was able
                to reproduce the process itself. Reproduce the experiment and get
                the same results again and again, proved clearly to Zarathustra that
                there was a Science of the Spirit and he was hot on it's trail.

                When it came to the mighty Elohim, the cognitive excellence of
                Zarathustra and his grasp of what the cosmos is, what stone, plant,
                animal and man are and how they became this way, his investigations
                and explorations were warmly appreciated by the gods and even caught
                the Eye of the great Sun Being. Because Zarathustra approached the
                how, and why and could connect to it inwardly, all the tumblers and
                meaning of humanity could click into place, because a human being
                grasped his part of the bargain of how the interior, biological,
                anatomical, astral, etheric and physical realities were set in the
                skeleton stone.

                But Zarathustra and the cosmic I AM knew that the cornerstone was
                rejected by flunked out students like Jung, as unable to support
                reality. The cognitive schooling that was at the core of all these
                mysteries, the I AM, was the invisible operating force that was the
                new thing to Earth. This invisible thing, not made with hands,
                seemed unimportant to many striving souls.

                We don't get results because we are not curious about the nature of
                the levity factor, the rising factor of the Spirit of Form and
                Etheric system that we see in plants, animals and the complex system
                in humans. Zarathustra got results, scientific and star justified,
                cosmos justified, and accurate results because he grasped the human
                etheric body and was able to bequeath a working model of it to some
                of his pupils. A working model of a highly developed, complex human
                etheric body could be reproduced, emancipated by Zarathustra and
                offered to significant pupils as they progressed. Zarathustra could
                reproduce it and bequeath it, like grafting, primitively speaking,
                like grafting is to plants so the operative skills of the etheric
                body, the Ka, could be part of the research and potential skill sets
                of future students.

                Next Zarathustra worked intelligently through the forces of the
                stars that operate in the astral body. The details of his work and
                the results where Angels understood and Zarathustra planned with the
                Angelic and mighty Sun Being, how to bring about the intersection on
                the Earth of landing two vessels, two Jesus children, landing these
                with all the complicated workings of the stars and TIME, into a
                precise and CONSCIOUS location, are based on the facts of the
                science of the human being and getting specific results when we are
                accurate in our thinking and I AM system.

                If we are accurate, then even the Angels recognize the star wisdom
                in the human heart and mind. Even the Angels and Archangels
                cooperate if the human being can grasp their wisdom as his own. The
                accuracy of that star wisdom that the Angels live within and with
                allowed Zarathustra to get results. Zarathustra could emancipate an
                advanced copy, a model of a working astral body. An astral body that
                was penetrated by the thinking I and had within it specific
                discoveries and intuitions that any objective scientist or
                researcher would discover for themselves. Some of these science
                insights are now sitting in the public domain as Grail Sciences and
                Spiritual Science.

                Zarathustra accurately was able to make copies of not only his
                etheric methodolgy and his etheric body, but also was able to
                emancipate and reproduce an independent model of his astral body.
                The results of all of these integrations are the science system we
                know that must be grasped as Physical, etheric, astral, I AM,
                Sentient Soul, Intellectual Soul, Consciousness Soul and the higher
                attributes, Spirit-Self, Life-Spirit and Spirit-Man.

                If humanity continues to do all of its thinking unconciously and
                remains influenced and pressed by the dark unconscious forces of the
                hidden beings that influence his will, he will merely stumble along
                unable to understand the difference between Light and Darkness. When
                humanity continues to repeat errors over and over again then the
                stars send these failed scientific and war like social aggressions,
                back on humanity for a redux. The stars send our lessons back to us,
                the senders, and give us an F in unfounded and undeveloped moral and
                scientific theory. Unaccepted, try again! We as humanity once more
                encounter these same unconcious blunders and mirrored errors in
                similiar forms until we can detox them and learn the lessons of the
                cosmos consciously.

                Reality responds when humanity becomes conscious of how the parts of
                the complex time mechanism of man fits into a whole. The carnival,
                the media circus and our own cleverly manufactured Ahrimanic Sun of
                the nuclear age was placed there so that humanity had seemed to have
                gotten results. Nice try but wrong, dead wrong! Wrong light and all
                moral substance, utterly removed...dead light, you found dead light,
                not living light and not only that the light that you found
                continues to kill and does not continue to heal. These are man made
                results.

                The Christ Event contains actual scientific results of clear
                thinking that reveal the highest level of physics and light
                condensed through the moral fiber of the human I AM. With the event
                of Golgotha and all of the factors associated with Golgothat, that
                founded the scientific thinking that got such overwhelming results,
                these are all part of the Grail Sciences that Orwellian history
                revisionists wish to dismiss, deny and destroy. In other words the
                actual cornerstone of the cosmos, the I AM, and Logos that sits in
                the stone of the physical, is truly spirit.

                http://www.ibiblio.org/eldritch/jkh/gr7.html

                Now when we examine the levity of light and the pure etheric full
                floating and rising form of the fully impressed Spirit Man rising
                from the schooling that humans got right, that they understood with
                scientific clarity, that they could make the models for and redux
                and repeat the experiment again and again, with scientific accuracy,
                they knew that they were now understanding the intricate physics of
                the human being. The intricate physics, for lack of a better
                concept, of that light which quantum mechanics seeks...and what
                quantum mechanics seeks within the activity of light, might very
                well be contained in the first lines of the Gospel of St. John. That
                is why Steiner would have brought a morally grounded physics science
                to Munich and named it the Johannes Bau. Why?

                "The light shines in the darkness, but the darkness has not
                understood it. He was in the world, and though the world was made
                through him, the world did not recognize him." (John 1:5,10)

                …..." 12[And Jesus said to them,] "I am the light of the world.
                Whoever follows me will never walk in darkness, but will have the
                light of life." 13The Pharisees challenged him, "Here you are,
                appearing as your own witness; your testimony is not valid." 14Jesus
                answered, "Even if I testify on my own behalf, my testimony is
                valid, for I know where I came from and where I am going. But you
                have no idea where I come from or where I am going… 23…"You are from
                below; I am from above. You are of this world; I am not of this
                world."

                Instead of a manufactured poison Ahrimanic circus act, a bright
                poison light without moral substance, Steiner would have gladly
                connected the dots of Light and Love to the moral framework and core
                of the human being as the Science of being Human, a Grail Science
                and the mission and meaning of why Steiner would have intercepted
                those physics scientists in Munich and unriddled the opening verses
                of the John Gospel for them and for all mankind.

                The intricate integration of the etheric timepiece and the vast, yet
                specifically shrink wrapped Star navigation system that each person
                carries as the results, in their Dodecahedron enclosed system, of
                our TWELVE cranial nerves, is part of the physics systems of human
                beings. We each have sucked and inverted into us an individualized
                cosmic map. In this core, and along the walls of the skull, the star
                map glitters and sparkles like vivid and animated cave paintings and
                visual impressions, memories, dreams and reflections that allow us
                to strike out and capture time impressions from the past as well as
                the future.

                We own a sensitive light house beacon, a light sensitive pineal
                gland, that when schooled and awakened, not only picks out and
                differentiates different thought spectrum bands, different thought
                spectrum light fields from individuals who think, but is slowly able
                to see the qualities of Time Beings and the qualities and aspects of
                Spiritual Beings. The Pineal is an Eye that detects thoughts and
                qualties and Steiner nailed it in the Philosophy of Freedom by
                saying it is an organ for the peception of thought. Our brains and
                directly our pineal embedded Eye, diferentiates different light and
                ideas, thoughts and Beings, infinite different spectrums and learns
                to read this light from within the enclosed dark chamber of the
                skull.

                Humanity must continue to fail at it's repeated star exams and the
                Michael School at this juncture is re-encountering the rejected and
                unconscious impulses that promoted the chaos of the 20th century and
                returns again in another form and another generation to rob us of
                the 21st century. The robbing and hijacking of the 21st century are
                the results of our failure to see the repeated pattern and
                unconscious dark intent of beings, yet it is also a challenge for
                the Michael School to see the details of what Steiner wrestled with
                in TIME, within a conscious Zeitgeist relationship and offered as
                clarity to the German people. We can fathom and track the meaning of
                this same clarity today, but with greater insight, greater vision
                and greater understanding because Rudolf Steiner forged a path ahead
                of us and prepared the next generation of Michael students to read
                the signs of the times.

                http://wn.rsarchive.org/Books/GA023/English/SCR2001/GA023_appendix.ht
                ml

                We in western civilization will continue to fail and have these
                impulses thrust back in our faces in a more and more severe
                Orwellian fashion unless we learn the Science of Man. Spiritual
                Science reveals the accurate Scientific data that Zarathustra worked
                through. It was bequeathed to Steiner so that Steiner could present
                this data in his most excellent Scientific thought world process and
                stand as a conscious Being, presenting the Schooling that the Logos
                expects and accepts as excellent.

                When I look at the biodynamic calendar it is vastly different for
                the plants and the accuracy of the science of the etheric world,
                than if someone follows some computerized horoscopes taken from the
                internet. The positions of the Sun, Moon and planets are not correct
                so that even when we measure the stunted and inaccurate horoscopes
                against the active and living RESULTS that come from biodynamics, we
                clearly understand that we have taken a giant step closer to reality
                and scientific results by having biodynamic accuracy before us.

                Biodynamic food tastes differently, richer, and the techniques are
                approached with more wisdom and moral substance because they are
                based on corrected and renewed clarity regarding the growth of
                plants, the seasons and the activity of the stars themselves.
                Zarathustra would have no problem with Biodynamics. He certainly
                would know the etheric inside out and well enough as a Bodhisattva,
                that he could bring vast improvements to agriculture and the secret
                remedies of the world.

                The question for those who claim to have anything to do with
                scientists are just how very happy they are when they seem to get
                results. Products that come off the assembly line like our Hydrogen
                or nuclear results, prove that there is an anti-human direction that
                perverts, yes you heard it, perverts human common sense and shifts
                it into results without ethics. Shifts corporate and multi-national
                militaristic motives into the mix of what it considers results that
                profit the corporate entity. This perversion and fragmentation of
                the science of man, is what we offer our children and invest all our
                money so that our children will have an education that promotes
                perversion of the intellect. Eisenhower warned America but we have
                failed to keep watch over our own dark intents.

                We will lose the connections and results of understanding the
                Science of the Grail if we lose the 20th and the 21st centuries and
                they get buried under the debris of World Wars and chaos again. We
                are too simplistic and too naive to think through and support real
                understanding of Grail Sciences and recover history and Spiritual
                Science so that it shines and glows in pristine purity from
                classrooms everywhere. We already wading through the debris of the
                19th and 20th century attacks on the Consciousness Soul and Grail
                Sciences. Each person has to clarify their own intelligence and
                parents have to be true guardians, not in the sense of fake
                fundamentalism, but in vast and well grounded spiritualized humanism
                that supports the vistas and vision of the I AM.

                This Do in Remembrance of Him. "That the Lord Jesus the same night
                in which he was betrayed took bread: And when he had given thanks,
                he brake it, and said, Take, eat: this is my body, which is broken
                for you: this do in remembrance of me" (1 Cor. 11:23­24).

                He took the cup, saying: "This cup is the new testament in my blood:
                this do ye, as oft as ye drink it, in remembrance of me. For
                [whenever] ye eat this bread, and drink this cup, ye [proclaim] the
                Lord's death till he come" (1 Cor. 11:25­26). He said that this
                sacrament would be done in remembrance of Him. "This do in
                remembrance of me" were His words (Luke 22:19).

                And as Christ is the actual Etheric Sun of the moral Earth, when we
                understand that to be a Grail Science, is to understand how
                difficult and how hard it is to find Spiritual Science buried in the
                impulses of The Christmas Conference and humble Angelic call to
                mankind of "The Foundation Stone". To find, locate and clearly grasp
                the obscure location that Parsifal could barely refind, and only
                found after maturing, is the challenge of grasping the very hidden,
                humble and obscure reality and RESULTS, when the Cosmos says Yes, as
                it did with the Christ Event. Finding Grail Sciences and the thread
                of history through the storm that is presented is truly a Parsifal
                task. It is a Parsifal task make no mistake.

                The Goetheanum remains, obscure, hidden and out of reach and has all
                the earmarks of the full and astonishing tale of the obscure path
                required to find the Holy Grail. And Steiner, Michael, Wagner,
                Kaspar Hauser and vast numbers of individuals wanted humanity to
                have this Grail wisdom, and we must keep it alive or it will get
                utterly lost in watered down Orwellian history and lies.
              • carol
                `The greatest misfortune is the harbinger of the greatest redemption `On earth one sees the destruction, yet in the destruction is contained already the seed
                Message 7 of 25 , Feb 7, 2007
                  `The greatest misfortune is the harbinger of the greatest
                  redemption'

                  `On earth one sees the destruction, yet in the destruction is
                  contained already the seed of renewal.'

                  These words of wisdom are derived from the `after-death messages'
                  which Rudolf Steiner received from the then disincarnate Helmuth von
                  Moltke, in 1919 and which he(RS) effectively documented. They
                  appear in the volume `Light For The New Millennium' (Rudolf Steiner
                  Press l997). I have transcribed some passages from several of these
                  messages because I found that they add to the insights which we, as
                  incarnated souls, are able to generate amongst ourselves concerning
                  our present task in light of what we experience outwardly and what we
                  have understood through contemplating Steiner's lectures. These are
                  by no means the only insights available in this book, I only stopped
                  at a given moment.

                  These communications may offer some comfort to readers, since they
                  touche upon what relevance suffering may have towards the greater
                  picture of humanity's strivings…

                  In one passage, when referring to the twenty first century, the being
                  of HvM indicated that `everywhere there will be centers of
                  spiritual will and deed'. I imagine that the internet has
                  effectively sealed this truth, even though there also exists today
                  many centers in the physical sense.

                  That which is striking and yet conveyed in a most familiar manner is
                  the `reality' that discarnate souls are quite engaged in the great
                  spiritual tasks of world, even when they are not here. Also, that
                  they depend on the thoughts which incarnate souls generate within
                  themselves in order to be able to contemplate the lofty ambitions of
                  their own future return.

                  One could also note the sense that `the greater picture' in which we
                  are now engaged on a physical level, contains very many details which
                  we inevitably find hard to ascertain in our present incarnate
                  condition. I've noticed that at times, in exchanges on topics of
                  spiritual science, that various people will affirm a truth, but
                  almost immediately afterward, affirm another one which is
                  strikingly clothed with perception dependent on physical reality. I
                  guess that we all have to all learn to be vigilant in developing our
                  abilities to feel for what is living in a spiritual sense when
                  something is communicated to us, and recognize through feeling,
                  that which is encased in impressions derived from sense perception.

                  I thoroughly enjoyed Bradford's latest post in which he focused on
                  bridging scientific perception to the spirit world. I felt that I
                  should retrieve these 2 passages from the Bible "The light shines in
                  the darkness, but the darkness has not understood it. (John 1:5) " 12
                  [And Jesus said to them,] "I am the light of the world.Whoever
                  follows me will never walk in darkness, but will have the light of
                  life." Light and darkness continue to be discussed even from the
                  world beyond.

                  In the `after death messages' one can gather a sense that a bridge
                  has been established between both the below and at the same time,
                  taking into account the great turmoil which occurs in the `below';

                  Out of obstruction the spirit seeks
                  For strong supports, which may bear it
                  As in the dawning, the light reveals itself
                  As the bearer of the forces of destiny.
                  With spiritual bonds, both here and there
                  We shall strive together
                  To seek both now and ever more
                  The meaning in true life. (message23, 23 march 1919)


                  In the following messages, `she' `El's' refer to the being HvM's
                  still incarnate wife. `It' could refer to one form of a constant,
                  conscious spiritual reality.


                  38. Message of 29 January l918

                  In human life the soul can take hold of something long before
                  consciousness takes hold of it. The bodily organization is often an
                  obstacle to understanding consciously what the soul has taken hold of
                  already. For consciousness requires for its instrument a certain
                  organization, be it a physical one between birth and death or a
                  spiritual one between death and a new birth. The soul alone may well
                  experience something but not be able to understand it consciously.
                  However, man can only comprehend the experiences of his soul through
                  his physical body if this physical body can be imbued with the fully
                  developed spirit-organism. Yet it is often the physical body itself
                  which presents an obstacle to that. It is a bliss to realize in
                  retrospect that the suffering one has endured originated there.

                  The suffering one has endured presents a very different picture when
                  one looks back on it at a later time..

                  Wakefulness is necessary, in the narrow as well as in the wider
                  contexts. There s a lot of chaos on earth. The spiritual, however,
                  is as if blunted. Human beings will first have to prepare their
                  souls by developing a feeling for the spiritual world. Then the
                  spiritual world-waiting to be understood-will be there to help.

                  James1, 17 `Every gift which is truly good and every perfect present
                  descends to us out of the higher world from the Father of lights I
                  whom there is no alternation and no phases of light and darkness.'

                  39. Message of 8 February 1918

                  …In the context of the present spiritual constellation it seems good
                  to me now that I was scarcely drawn into an active role in the
                  battles in the East. This enables me to make spiritual connections
                  with many eastern souls. The chaos there will only gradually take o
                  the forms that it must eventually come to. My view of the tasks that
                  come to me from the East is unobstructed to the extent that I have
                  worked directly in the West and only indirectly in the East. Thus
                  what was puzzling down there is now clear. The East is awaiting a
                  task for which I must prepare myself by the next century. Earthly
                  institutions must then be founded which will be an image of spiritual
                  ones. `She' and others who are linked with us are to work together on
                  this.

                  A spiritual wilderness is now spreading over the earth. The `old
                  man' can see this now, too. How he will stand in relation to the
                  task that lies before us is not yet clear. In the twentieth century
                  there will be a great deal of materialism which will be even more
                  powerful in the twenty-first century. But everywhere there will be
                  centers of spiritual will and deed. That is where the task will
                  lie. In the `forms' of Dornach which I can now feel, I can see lines
                  which are preparing something which in future will enable one soul to
                  understand another more inwardly.

                  …Wakefulness is needed. I cannot see everything very clearly in this
                  area. But I can see a crisis. In essence there is much that has
                  built up over many years which is now moving towards a crisis. While
                  I was alive I faced this with some anxiety. This anxiety now has a
                  baleful effect when I look at the critical situation…Nevertheless, it
                  is essential to be wakeful on earth.

                  It has a warming effect on me that `she' now has `it' with her
                  again. Now is the time for something spiritual between them to join
                  on to what was there before, which is important for the future and
                  for the task. There is more at work in `it', than `it' itself
                  knows. This has to do with the fact that `it' was also an
                  intermediary to the spiritual world for my soul. We had to go
                  through spiritual experiences in which there was much that was
                  unconscious. `It' has to remember many things from those days. By
                  this means, `it' will be able to help a great deal in the present and
                  in the future. `She' will need much wakefulness now. In the company
                  of `it' this wakefulness will gain in strength. When the two are
                  together there lives a force in my soul which serves to make me
                  strong for the `task'…

                  …Whatever happens, `she' should follow the dictates of `her'
                  understanding; if one does not always appear to come to the right
                  thing, it is only apparently so and later, subsequent events will
                  show what was right…

                  …the greatest misfortune is the harbinger of the greatest
                  redemption: many who are on earth will learn of this, but will only
                  gradually come to experience it. Spirits who now strive to work in
                  souls on earth freeze in spiritual coldness that works like fire, and
                  consumes the effect….

                  40. Message of 1 March l918

                  …It is now possible for me to view objectively what is going on in
                  the small details and in the major events of life on earth. Early
                  sufferings are often the starting points for processes of spiritual
                  development. Let `her' be aware that I am with `her', let `her' see
                  what is happening now as necessity. `She' must not let her heart be
                  troubled by events, but must connect her thoughts with the fact that
                  by means of these events, things of the future are coming to pass,
                  which must come to pass. The spirit must destroy many things in
                  order to build anew. On earth one sees the destruction, yet in the
                  destruction is contained already the seed of renewal.

                  We often see pass away
                  What on earth has been built
                  Yet what is truly coming to pass
                  Seen rightly in the spirit
                  Reveals in earthly night
                  To the seeking light of the soul
                  The developing might of spirit
                  And sufferings are not
                  What on earth they seem
                  They are in full truth
                  What they spiritually mean
                  In the kingdom of soul clarity

                  `El's' individuality was connected with us differently to that
                  of `it'. `El' must first bring into consciousness how she belongs to
                  us. She must find the strength to be conscious out of suffering.
                  She is now holding back an old power in order to gain a new one. My
                  soul must be with her so that `she' may find the right way Events
                  can be confusing. Wakefulness will lead to what is right at the
                  right moment. No good is done by saying at the outset: `This and
                  this should happen', one must wait and see what circumstances require.

                  Looking back at the moment of my `rebirth', at the beginning of this
                  century, is the lifeblood of my soul; looking back at the time of my
                  suffering before my present entry into the spiritual world gives me
                  the spiritual air I breath. Thinking through with `her' what karma
                  has woven through us over the centuries gives light of day to my
                  soul. Let `her' see the manner in which I live with her in this
                  way. I must hold fast to these great connections in my soul, so that
                  I can live wit those things which move her in the realm of time.
                  For the being who is no longer embodied, those temporal things which
                  come up to him from those who are close to him on earth, enabling him
                  to share in their lives, are like the objects in a room for one who
                  is living. The latter cannot see these objects, however close they
                  may be, unless the light of the sun shines into the room. In the
                  spiritual world, this sunlight is provided by insight into the great
                  spiritual connections. In earthly life one might have the perspective
                  even as an older person of a few decades. Out of the body, one must
                  direct the gaze of the soul across centuries. And this gaze across
                  the centuries must be illuminated by the understanding which one has
                  been able to acquire through contemplating ideas of how things relate
                  to one another in the greater dimension of the spirit. ..In the life
                  of the spirit, one has constantly to re-enliven the thought with
                  one's own life of soul, just as, in life on earth, the physical body
                  must constantly breather in fresh air. Thus it is also good when
                  tried and tested thoughts keep coming up from those who are still
                  living in the body.
                • Valerie Walsh
                  ... Hey, hey, my, my... ... They do make an excellent grilled cheese there. ... for ... so ... fish ... I never watched Meet your Meat but I liked Store Wars a
                  Message 8 of 25 , Feb 7, 2007
                    --- In anthroposophy@yahoogroups.com, "chanting_om"
                    <blue_star_in@...> wrote:

                    > Well that is just the most amazing song! I have one for you.. I
                    > picked it up in India. Its called Journey to infinity, it is so
                    > beautiful, haunting.. bamboo flute.. and its 14.27 minutes long.
                    >
                    > I'll put it on right now.

                    Hey, hey, my, my...

                    > Hong Kong.. I'm not in Hongkong ! Otherwise I would have had a
                    > grilled cheese sandwich with a touch of worscestor sauce long ago !

                    They do make an excellent grilled cheese there.

                    > NO ! I am on an island which is 50 percent covered with rainforest
                    > and I am more or less in the middle of it. Now there are shops on
                    > campus but they don't stock anything that you and I would
                    > recognise..in fact the vast majority of food is fresh vegetables,
                    > meat and fish.
                    > I watched that film on smirking chimp about Meet your Meat so that
                    > causes considerable conscience problems now, everytime I put a drop
                    > of milk in my tea or think of a cheese sandwich I must apologise
                    for
                    > my weaknesses. The other day I thought Okay I will buy some fish,
                    so
                    > I go down to the market and this woman has a whole row of large
                    fish
                    > with the heads cut off who are still alive balanced on their necks,
                    > gulping air and rolling their eyes. The rest of their bodies have
                    > already been cut up and filleted.

                    I never watched Meet your Meat but I liked Store Wars a lot.

                    > But on the otherside of the rainforest - south - there is Sanya
                    and
                    > to the north there is Haikou.. :) (and cheese sandwiches and butter
                    > and what happened to the cows...?)
                    >
                    > Could that have been one of your songs that you unburied...?

                    No, couldn't have been-I did sing the National Anthem once but that's
                    a sing along.

                    > Anyway perhaps we can borrow some books from the library and there
                    is
                    > definately a hotel ! Do you know how to fly?

                    Nahhhh, never took it up but that's a long story.-Val
                  • Valerie Walsh
                    ... http://moviesnooneshouldsee.wordpress.com/2006/12/12/27/
                    Message 9 of 25 , Feb 7, 2007
                      --- In anthroposophy@yahoogroups.com, Shakti <blue_star_in@...> wrote:

                      > What an amazing poem I will present it to my students !
                      > Its lovely

                      http://moviesnooneshouldsee.wordpress.com/2006/12/12/27/
                    • Mark Willan
                      Hi everyone I set out a few more pieces of the mosaic of what is going on across the planet: RS referred to the Apocalypse of the Mount of Olives (Matt 24,
                      Message 10 of 25 , Feb 14, 2007
                        Hi everyone

                        I set out a few more pieces of the mosaic of what is going on across the planet:

                        RS referred to the Apocalypse of the Mount of Olives (Matt 24, Mark 13 and Luke 2:15-33)   as specifically referring to the time of the Second Coming - ie of the etheric Chirst - that is now.

                        It is well worth reading all 3 passages for the insights they give on our present time.

                        I also recently learned that the "curse of the psuchotherapist" was the inablility to fall in love - how telling and what preparation for a campaign by the adversaries of human development.

                        For both Sorath and Ahriman hide from human awareness in order to better manipulate mankind, and they aim to produce resuklts which karma cannot later compensate for.

                        We can however, consciously work inwardly to counter these currents: 

                        firstly by learning and meditating on the lessons for each of us from the state of grace that being in love is, which is an archetype of our future relations with each othert (I am the Vine and you are the branches- and see the Discourses of the Last Supper in John), and 

                        secondly by realising that those humans we identify as doing evil (and whose victims we may also be) are often acting out of a misguided conviction that they are right. The Nazis were mostly convinced they were doing the right thing, and this is a lesson we should learn.

                        It is very rare for anyoen to consciously choose to do evil, but it is more often that people become compromised and cannot see the way out. 

                        If we cannot empathise, and find a way through their guard, we can never hope to bring them round to a correct way of thinking - living thinking. Foe example, by attacking GWB we will only cut short any dialogue - if we look for the positive in his approach (the desire to take responsibility, however misguided, etc,) living thought seeds can be sown which may yet change the world.

                        For even if they are our enemies, such people whio give us trails often turn out to be our truest friends, by makign sure our own development is not a fake - by ensuring that we stop trying to take the splinter out of our briother's eye and work on the beam in our own.

                        The real work to be done to change the world is on ourselves, the microcosm. When we haev changed that, the macrocosm must inevitably follow.

                        That is why a number of inner workers have now been gathering, sent by forces of fate, to the orient - to prepare the spiritual onslaught against the forces of Ahriman being arrayed in the West.

                        Miraculous spirit growth has occurred in newly Christian China, and we can see that allied with the forces of the etheric Christ, a shift in world view is actually a possibility as a mass movement, to be nurtured and founded here.

                        At the moment, we are in a kind of pralaya, in which the seeds for this are being sown in spirit.

                        We shall be intensifying work inwardly to perfect ourselves, to ready ourselves for the great work that remains to be done.

                        So should we all, IMHO.

                        For we want our lives to be a blessing don't we, not a burden on humanity.

                        And let us remember, that it is mankind's karma to develop and grow - which means if we do not do so consciously without pain, we will learn the hard way. That is the way it works - just look at life around you.

                        Let us also remember that the destiny of mankind rests not just in our own hands, but in those of the Logos. To quote Gandhi, for a time the forces of oppression can appear invincible, but they never last.

                        Nor can they this time. 

                        Just my tuppence worth.








                        Mark Willan

                        21 Balmoral Park
                        #02-14 Pïnewood Gardens
                        Singapore 259850

                        Tel: +65 64040702
                        Mob: +65 9019 4314





                      • holderlin66
                        In French, alternate history novels are called uchronie. This neologism is based on the word utopia (a place that doesn t exist) and the Greek for time,
                        Message 11 of 25 , Feb 15, 2007
                          "In French, alternate history novels are called uchronie. This
                          neologism is based on the word utopia (a place that doesn't exist) and
                          the Greek for time, chronos. An uchronie, then, is defined as a time
                          that doesn't exist. Another occasionally-used term for the genre
                          is "allohistory".

                          "The earliest example of alternate history appears to be Book IX,
                          sections 17-19, of Livy's History of Rome from Its Foundation. He
                          contemplates the possibility of Alexander the Great expanding his
                          father's empire westward instead of eastward and attacking Rome in the
                          4th century BC.

                          19th century

                          "In the English language, the first known complete alternate history
                          is Nathaniel Hawthorne's short story "P.'s Correspondence", published
                          in 1845. It recounts the tale of a man who is considered "a madman"
                          due to his perceiving a different 1845, a reality in which long-dead
                          famous people are still alive such as the poets Burns, Byron, Shelley,
                          and Keats, the actor Edmund Kean, the British politician George
                          Canning and even Napoleon Bonaparte.

                          Bradford comments;

                          Recovering history and understanding psychology allows us to examine
                          an author who felt the sting of two universes, two different grooves
                          of time and the ZeitGeist. The author had good reason for this
                          experience and not exactly the same reasons that a Michael School
                          student might have.

                          On the other hand, when you examine the evidence you might clearly
                          understand that the writer who brought, "Blade Runner", "Total Reall"
                          and "The Minority Report" also had a twin sister whose death and
                          spirit hovered over Dick through his whole life. Dick's writing career
                          was an effort in trying to reconcile a hovering experience that
                          brought his gaze to the vicinity of how two worlds interact. In Philip
                          K. Dick himself there attempts to break into his experiences from a
                          parallel psychology aother world, another history, an alternative
                          history, behind the history that we accomodate or pacify ourselves
                          with.

                          To those who are training themselves to look into the etheric world,
                          to understand that for instance, the manufactured world of worship
                          that was created with the rise of the Ahrimanic Sun, brought humanity
                          to it's fearful pagan quivering knees, because it manifested a poison,
                          inhuman, murdering light that fit the bill of how we imagined the
                          wrath of god. In this lie we see and live currently in an alternate
                          universe. We are just too cognitively weak to take hold of real ideas,
                          so we tend to meld them and mush them together in the soul.

                          And that same god we worship today as we threaten Iran with nuclear
                          attack is an Ahrimanic god, that has stepped in, with all our world
                          wide media glorification, and adoration, to eclipse, just at the right
                          moment, eclipse from the view of the world, the rise of the Human
                          Cosoms of Mankind and The Etheric Christ Being who mastered for
                          humanity the entire future model of the SPirit Man. We see an
                          alternative universe and an alternative history.

                          This future model of Spirit Man must be attained within a vast sweep
                          of long term human development that follows Earth with Jupiter
                          evolution and Venus and Vulcan evoltuion... and the names, like Vulcan
                          have all been hijacked and woven into pop culture trivia and the sound
                          and imagination of the word divorced from the unfolding reality of how
                          humanity has grown from Ancient Saturn as a mere seed of warmth, Old
                          Sun, adding an etheric superstructure, and Ancient Moon evolution with
                          an astral body and nervous system design, and Earth, with it's Iron
                          and Sun like blood forces that respond to compassion, love, and
                          courage and bears the signature of a time being, a reincarnating i am
                          in dipping in and out of the stream of ongoing time. These are rich
                          thoughts and thought that can keep a human being sober while he
                          navigates the Zeitgeist.

                          But Philip K. Dick, got his form of initiaiton the hard way. He felt
                          very clearly his dead twin sister. We can use the hovering soul of his
                          sister, as a kind of orbiting lunar reflection that hovered over
                          Dick's soul and cast into his thought sphere, refractions, prismatic
                          refractions, that partially had intuitions from the world of the dead
                          and the spiritual world and partially mangled constructs of science in
                          modern materialism. Dick wrote to reconcile these extremes in himself,
                          but unable to define the soul or spirit as the science that should be
                          there.

                          "Philip Kindred Dick and his twin sister, Jane Charlotte Dick, were
                          born six weeks prematurely to Joseph Edgar and Dorothy Kindred Dick in
                          Chicago. According to various accounts, Dorothy was unable to properly
                          feed and care for the newborns, and Jane was badly burned by an
                          electric blanket. Dick's father, a fraud investigator for the United
                          States Department of Agriculture, had recently taken out life
                          insurance policies, and an insurance nurse was dispatched to the home.
                          Upon seeing the malnourished Philip and injured Jane, the nurse rushed
                          the babies to the hospital, but baby Jane died on the way there, five
                          weeks after her birth (January 26, 1929). The death of Dick's twin
                          sister had a profound effect on his writing, relationships, and every
                          other aspect of his life, leading to the recurrent motif of
                          the "phantom twin" in many of his books."

                          "In summarising Philip K. Dick in his history of science
                          fiction, "Trillion Year Spree", Brian Aldiss commented: "All his
                          novels are one novel . . ." But it goes further than that, because the
                          premise behind virtually all his writing is a subjective view of
                          reality, an almost paranoid obsession with things being other than
                          they seem. Suppose you discover that you have been leading a false
                          existence or, worse still, one imposed on you by those in positions of
                          authority."

                          "Throughout February and March 1974 he received a series of visions
                          which he collectively referred to as 2-3-74, shorthand for
                          February/March 1974. He described his initial visions as laser beams
                          and geometric patterns, and occasionally brief pictures of Jesus and
                          ancient Rome, which he would glimpse periodically. As the pictures
                          increased in length and frequency, Dick claimed that he began to live
                          a double life, one as himself and one as Thomas, a Christian
                          persecuted by Romans in the 1st century A.D. Despite his past and
                          continued drug use, Dick accepted these visions as reality, believing
                          that he had been contacted by a god-entity of some kind, which he
                          referred to variously as Zebra, God, and, most often, VALIS."

                          Dick's writing, "The Man in the High Castle" underwent its point of
                          divergence from our own world due to the assassination of President
                          Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1933. He was succeeded by Vice President John
                          Nance Garner, who was subsequently replaced by John W. Bricker.
                          Neither man was able to revive the nation from the Great Depression,
                          and both clung to a isolationist policy related to the oncoming war.

                          Due to poor U.S. economic performance and isolationism, Britain and
                          the rest of Europe fell to the Axis Powers. Russia collapsed in 1941
                          and was occupied by the Nazis, while most of the Slavic people were
                          exterminated. The Slavic survivors of the war were confined
                          to "reservation-like closed regions". The Japanese completely
                          destroyed the United States' Pacific fleet in a much more expansive
                          attack on Pearl Harbor. Due to Japan's expanded military capabilities,
                          it was able to invade and occupy Hawaii, Australia, New Zealand and
                          the Southwestern Pacific in the early forties. After this, the United
                          States fell to the Axis, with many important cities suffering great
                          damage.

                          By 1947, Allied forces had surrendered to Axis control. The Eastern
                          Seaboard was placed under German control while California and other
                          western states ceded to Japanese rule. The Southern United States was
                          revived as a quasi-independent state (as a Nazi puppet state like
                          Vichy France). The Rocky Mountain States and much of the Midwest
                          remained autonomous, being considered unimportant by either of the
                          victors, as well as a useful buffer. At the end of the war, the
                          British leaders and generals were tried for war crimes (e.g. the
                          carpet bombing of German cities) in a parallel of the Nuremberg Trials.

                          After Adolf Hitler was incapacitated by syphilis, the head of the Nazi
                          Party Chancellery, Martin Bormann, assumed the leadership of Germany.
                          The Nazis created a colonial empire and continued their mass murder of
                          races they considered inferior, murdering Jews in the puppet United
                          States and other areas they controlled and mounting massive genocide
                          in Africa. However, unlike the Nazis, the Japanese had no policy of
                          cleansing the occupied areas of "unwanted" races.

                          Nazi Germany continued their rocketry programs, so that by 1962, they
                          had a working system of commercial rockets used for inter-continental
                          travel and also pursued space exploration, by sending rockets to the
                          Moon and Mars. The novel also mentions television as being a new
                          technology used in Germany.

                          Meanwhile Japan continued more peaceful, but certainly not democratic
                          rule, over much of Asia and territories within the Pacific Ocean. Like
                          the United States and the Soviet Union after our own world's World War
                          II, the Japanese and the Germans are distrustful of one another. Nazi
                          Germany and the Japanese Empire both possess nuclear weapons and are
                          mired in their own Cold War.

                          During the novel, Martin Bormann dies and other Nazis such as Joseph
                          Goebbels and Reinhard Heydrich challenge to become Reich Chancellor
                          (German: Reichskanzler). Various factions of the Nazi party are
                          described as either seeking war with Japan or being more interested in
                          colonizing the solar system"

                          http://www.answers.com/topic/the-man-in-the-high-castle

                          Bradford concludes;

                          Our examinations hinges on the defeat, or retreat of Michael Zeitgeist
                          Grail Science schooling, that was planned and a model of the building,
                          the Johannes Bau, for Munich was made by Steiner, but Anthroposphy
                          retreated and was boxed into Dornach, and reduced to Biodynamics world
                          wide sciences; Medical hospitals with Anthro/and regular medical
                          doctor training; Waldorf Education and a host of centers around the
                          world that are living off of the Christmas Conference, The Foundation
                          Stone, and the verified states of consciousness that surpass the
                          limitations of Jungian psychology and rest on an intangible but solid
                          experience of The Etheric Christ event that was on the rise as early
                          as the dawn of the Age of Light, 1899.

                          The question is, do you consider yourself a flaky and insane human
                          being if you follow the science laid down by Rudolf Steiner, Science
                          of the Spirit? The question remains, certainly most common sense views
                          of the matter refer to Dick's twin sister as an early childhood source
                          point where a two soul contact, two souls one on earth and the other
                          experiencing the conflicts near the threshold, might it not be the
                          source point of that which spurred Dick's entire biographical struggle
                          with twin realities?

                          How would materialistic science and its effect on a human being's
                          thinking mix with sporatic influences from the world of the dead?
                          Dick appears to my thinking as someone, like Rod Serling, Robert
                          Heinlein and his "Stranger in a Strange Land". Heinlein inserted into
                          culture a paradox of how Buddha and St. Francis on Mars was strongly
                          and unconsciously experienced by Heinlein in his time between death
                          and a new birth....Science Fiction was a partial method of the
                          transformation of the Mars forces of the intellect.

                          Philip K. Dick wrote;

                          "Several years ago, when I was ill, Heinlein offered his help,
                          anything he could do, and we had never met; he would phone me to cheer
                          me up and see how I was doing. He wanted to buy me an electric
                          typewriter, God bless him—one of the few true gentlemen in this world.
                          I don't agree with any ideas he puts forth in his writing, but that is
                          neither here nor there. One time when I owed the IRS a lot of money
                          and couldn't raise it, Heinlein loaned the money to me. I think a
                          great deal of him and his wife; I dedicated a book to them in
                          appreciation. Robert Heinlein is a fine-looking man, very impressive
                          and very military in stance; you can tell he has a military
                          background, even to the haircut. He knows I'm a flipped-out freak and
                          still he helped me and my wife when we were in trouble. That is the
                          best in humanity, there; that is who and what I love."
                        • holderlin66
                          Take out your Main Lesson books Spiritual Science students. Today we are offering the Giant s Heart a discourse on current events. Bradford brought; That is
                          Message 12 of 25 , Feb 16, 2007
                            Take out your Main Lesson books Spiritual Science students.
                            Today we are offering the Giant's Heart a discourse on current
                            events.

                            Bradford brought;

                            "That is why when we look at the disturbed heart condition of Dick
                            Cheney, we understand the disturbed condition of his heart in
                            relation to the great heart of the world."

                            Bradford adds;

                            Now this is where true thinkers rise and poor thinkers fall by the
                            way side. Poor thinkers with limp souls cannot and refuse to make
                            the connection that we are about to make. The connection that we are
                            about to make is to the Giants Heart. Presently being vice president
                            of the greatest super power on the planet, the United States, makes
                            Dick Cheney a heartless Giant. Now what kind of giant is Dick
                            Cheney? What is wrong and where is his heart if it has such trouble
                            finding the rhythm and keeping beat with the heart of the world?
                            Thesee are all simple questions with surprisingly simple answers
                            that with Jungian insights and vague imaginations we certainly will
                            not find many people left in the U.S. who can digest rich insights
                            and see imaginations with the intimate clarity that students of
                            Spiritual Science may.

                            Of course we can and we have in the past brought into the argument
                            aspects of the U.S. involvement in America's fall into fascism and
                            how Dick Cheney truly plays a very significant part in where we
                            would raise the question of Ahrimanic ailments of the soul and
                            malfunctioning disconnection of a human heart to the heart of the
                            world. These Sorathian Spiritual Science and Ahrimanic patterns we
                            have traced with precise historical relationships that have picked
                            up the patterns of the dawn of 1914 and the surge of military
                            ahrimanic intent that is currently riding on the same historical
                            rhythm that led Cheney to sign and bring forward the pre-emptive
                            Imperialism of the PNAC or Project for a New Ahrimanic Century at
                            the crack of light of the dark arising of 1997/8.

                            For Cheney and big Oil middle eastern chaos must continue to erupt.
                            The world's supply of oil must be owned and kept by the United
                            States. This is U.S. policy. Pre-emptive attacks on innocent
                            countries murdering tens of thousands with escalation of torture and
                            fair trials gone the way of Nazi Germany...along with the U.S.,
                            Britain and Israel, a nasty triad that is sinking to Sorathian
                            levels of dark lodge intents, all this must continue for Amerika to
                            dominate under Cheney's heartlessness.

                            What type of imagination hovers around the leader, the actual black
                            Lodge mouthpiece of someone who cannot adjust his heart to the
                            actual heart of the world? We will present the diagnosis in a fairy
                            tale. That way those with true understanding of diagnostic pictures
                            and imaginations will have something extremely vital to point to
                            when they point to the reality behind the fall of the United States.
                            And we grant that all of us know that the real idea of terrorism is
                            not anywhere close to the representative reality of the heart of the
                            world, but if it were black ops and terrorism, it would match up
                            with what Dick Cheney wants to project all around him and America
                            with torture chambers over the globe... a Giant Darkness.

                            Now the second wave of Michael Intelligence might very well
                            understand the problems that exist in the subtext of history vs that
                            of recovering Grail history, the Etheric Christ and the human heart,
                            or the aspect of Justice and the aspect of understanding that as a
                            human being, if such a bad heart serves a dark master, it is better
                            to get a new heart and a new incarnation rather than continue on
                            with such an icy corrupt and cold heart. Dick Cheney has had his
                            heart removed.

                            The Heartless Giant

                            [Note when the word Giant appears INSERT, Dick Cheney}

                            On the whole, there's absolutely no need to be frightened by Giants.
                            Giants are gentle souls, perfectly harmless, and very affectionate.
                            Unless, of course, the Giant has no heart in his body.

                            Think of all kinds of unpleasant things and add Giant to them and
                            that's what you get when a Giant has no heart. Such a Giant once
                            terrorized a county in the far north of the world, near the very
                            top. He'd hidden his heart. It gave him too much trouble, all those
                            Giant Feelings, too much pain. In its place was a wasps' nest. About
                            to swarm. Put your ear to his chest and you'd hear an angry buzzing
                            noise.

                            This Heartless Giant could shake a man and shuffle his wits. He
                            could crack a skull with his fist like a walnut. And frequently did.
                            Until, at last, the old King of that country, as good as the Giant
                            was bad, trapped him in a giant trap and locked him in a cell. There
                            the Giant crouched, an inch of the outside world to look at, the
                            damp dripping from the walls, the dull rattle of his chains, his low
                            angry growl a ceaseless rumble through the King's castle.
                            Years passed in this was until the Giant's voice had grated away to
                            the hoarsest whisper and folk had quite forgotten about Giants with
                            no hearts. And he'd be there still, in his foul pit, were it not for
                            a little boy whose name was Leo.

                            Leo was the King's youngest son. He had two brothers who were
                            bigger. Prince Leo could leave not stone unturned, no passage
                            unexplored, no drawer unrammaged, so incurably curious was he. One
                            morning, scouting the far and deep of the castle, he came across a
                            tiny, barred window set in the bottom of a huge gray wall. Looking
                            through it, Leo saw nothing buy dank dark pitch black. But as he
                            turned away he imagined he heard a stir, and then came a growl, a
                            low buzz of a growl. It was a frightening sound.

                            His brothers told a Giant with no heart lived in this prison with
                            the tiny window. He didn't believe them. They were older, his
                            brothers, and forever teasing him. But the next day he went back,
                            carrying his drum. "Rat-tat-rat-ta-ta-tat," he played outside the
                            window. From inside the dark dank pitch black he heard a rattle,
                            like the rattle of a chain. He crept to the window and squinted into
                            the shadows. Two eyes blinked back at him. Leo jumped. A wasp buzzed
                            angrily through the bars. Leo ran off. It was true, there was a
                            Giant!

                            All night Leo thougth about the Giant, his eyes, the low rumbling
                            growl. Next morning, he was back, "rat-tat-rat-ta-ta-tat," on his
                            little drum. The Giant was waiting for him. When Leo tiptoed to the
                            window, he was there, whispering hello. The Giant told Leo that long
                            ago he had done some bad things and that the King had locked him up.
                            Leo couldn't imagine what these bad things were. He worried about
                            the poor Giant, stuck down there in terrible chains. He lit a candle
                            and held it to the hole.

                            The Giant was so big he had to crouch with his chin on this knees
                            and his elbos bent. He looked to Leo like a huge sad baby, his
                            yellow eyes screwed up against the candle's sudden glare. Leo said
                            he would speak to his father, it wasn't fair the Giant had been
                            locked up for so long; he must have been forgotten. "No," croaked
                            the Giant, all anxious. "If you say anything, they'll make me stay
                            down here forever and I shall surely perish." The eyes blinked
                            nearer. "Would you like to be my friend?"

                            Leo was elated. "Oh yes, yes please!" "Good. Good," said the Giant.
                            Good, thought Leo; I have a secret friend. Good, thought the Giant
                            who had shed his heart at last. And he sighed a chill sigh and
                            planned chill plans, while the young prince skipped back along the
                            path, swinging the iron gate behind him, caressing his secret,
                            nurturing it, back to his room.

                            And so it began, the friendship between the huge, crouching Giant
                            and the little Prince. Every day, the boy would appear, rat-tat-
                            tatting on his drum. Every day he'd tell a little more, hear a
                            little more, until he felt he knew no one better, that no one knew
                            him better. Oh, he wanted to tell the whole world about his friend.
                            But the Giant said, "Out secret," and Leo agreed, although he would
                            have loved to tell his mother or his two brothers or somebody. But
                            he couldn't so he shouldn't, so he wouldn't so he didn't. The Giant,
                            meanwhile crouched in his blackness and schemed. And so it was that
                            one day he told Leo he'd heard a Guard saying that the King slept
                            with the keys to the Giant's chains hanging on a ring by his bed.
                            Leo had always those keys were for the Crown Jewels. "No," said the
                            Giant. "They're for my misery." Leo felt desperate for his
                            misunderstood fiend, and a plan formed in his mind. The Giant
                            watched it being born and sighed a cold sigh. Deep inside, in the
                            prize where his heart should have been, the wasped seethed and
                            buzzed.

                            That very night, when the whole castle was sleeping, when the Royal
                            Guards slumped against their sentry posts and dozed, when the owls
                            hooted, little Prince Leo slipped from his bed, slid past a sleeping
                            sentry, and pushed on the door of his parents' room. He tiptoed
                            round the great bed with its velvet eiderdown, past his sleeping
                            mother and sleeping father, to the hook where the keys were hung.
                            They were so heavy. He heaved them up and they swung together,
                            clanging like the Angelus bell. Leo clutched them tight, their black
                            metal teeth squashing his toes, their hooped handles framing his
                            face. Slowly, slowly, inch by inch, he dragged the huge keys out of
                            the room.

                            "I've got the keys," he whispered, trembling at the little window.
                            He let them ring against the bars. "Who goes there?" challenged a
                            voice from the darkness. It was the one sentry still awake. "Hurry,
                            hurry!" growled the Giant from the bowels of the dungeon. Leo
                            struggled to push the keys through the bars. The teeth went in and
                            the long shafts, but when it came to the ring he couldn't work out
                            how to do it. "They're too big," he explained as he heard the
                            Giant's snort of impatience. "I can't do it." Leo wanted to drop the
                            keys and run for his life. "Push them," hissed the Giant. "Push
                            them!" The Giant's voice was colder than the night, it was icy. Leo
                            pushed. A great hand yanked on the keys. Leo saw its shape in the
                            shadows. He felt a terrible force pulling downward.

                            "Who goes there?" demanded the approaching voice. And then, with a
                            sudden wrench, the keys disappeared, pulling the bars with then into
                            the blackness. Leo heard a sigh issue from the Giant. A horrible
                            aching sigh. Then the turning of locks, the crushing of
                            doors. "Don't forget to let me have them back," he said, staring
                            blankly into the dungeon. He shivered again.

                            The sentry's torch was almost upon him. Suddenly the silence was
                            rent with cries. A man screamed, and there was the sound of
                            crunching, like a great walnut cracking. Then a broken, throaty
                            roar. At the far corner, a door burst from its hinges, spilling
                            light onto Leo's face. The Giant appeared. From his head, squeezing
                            at the entrance, pulling away bricks and lintels, then his
                            shoulders, squeezing, straining through. A giant baby being born
                            into the night. Leo watched, horrified. The Giant glanced at Leo,
                            but only for a second. As he emerged from the entrance, first one
                            sentry, then a second confronted him, challenging him with a sword
                            and spear. The Giant hoisted them up, one in each fist, and cracked
                            their heads together before tossing them away. Then, with the sound
                            of the alarm, the Heartless Giant turned and limped off, roaring his
                            broken roar.

                            All night Leo sat shivering on the battlements at the King and his
                            men searched the grounds of the castle. His father's angry words
                            haunted him. "Someone betrayed us. Only a madman would help a Giant
                            with no heart. Someone betrayed us." Leo's face swam with tears. So
                            letdown, he felt. So stupid. So guilty. Every scream was his fault.
                            Every cracked skull. And when finally morning came, the boy in him,
                            the innocent heart, the joy in him, they were gone-those things,
                            like his friend-and they would never return.

                            Next morning, Leo looked down and saw his Elder Brother march across
                            the courtyard. He carried his sword and his axe and his bow and a
                            large saddlebag, which he yanked up onto his shoulder. "Where are
                            you going?" Leo called down. "Sh-h-h!" warned the brother. "I am
                            going to get back the Giant." Leo felt awful. "Have you told
                            anybody?" Elder Brother shook his head proudly. "No. Of course not.
                            But I must go. Father is too old." And with this he offered up his
                            hand in salute and turned, young warrior, off to find the
                            Giant. "I'm sorry," wept his brother, but no one heard him.
                            And Elder Brother did not come back.

                            The spring came and went with sadness in it. Every day, more stories
                            reached the castle of the Giant's cruel rampage. So it was that one
                            glum morning, perched on the ledge of his window, Leo looked down
                            and saw Middle Brother striding through the courtyard, golden helmet
                            blazing, shield sparkling. "Where are you going?" Leo called
                            out. "To find our brother and to kill the Giant." Leo was beside
                            himself. "Please don't! It's madness. He has no heart." Middle
                            Brother shook his proud head. "I must go. Our father's too old now."
                            Leo could not stand it. "But he'll trick you!" he blurted
                            out. "He'll trick you!" Middle Brother would not listen. He raised
                            his hand in salute and set off to find the Giant. Terrible, Leo
                            felt, as he watched him go, terrible.

                            And Middle Brother did not come back either.

                            The summer that year was short, the winter wild and endless. One
                            day, Leo heard his mother's sobs from far off and came into her
                            bedroom to find her kneeling in sorrow, head against the green
                            velvet of the eiderdown. "Mother?" The Queen did not look up. "Your
                            father says he intends to go off and fight the Giant. "I've lost two
                            sons already. He's too old. He's too ill." She wept and wept. She
                            wanted Leo to promise he would not follow his brothers. "Promise me,
                            promise me you won't ever go." But he couldn't promise, how could
                            he? Were it not for him, the Heartless Giant would still be chained
                            and locked and safe in the dungeon.

                            Next morning, at the crack of dawn, dressed in thick leather jerkin,
                            Leo rode into the Royal Stables. He carried with him saddlebags
                            stuffed with cheese and ham and biscuits and salted beef, but no
                            weapon of any kind. He approached the stall where his father's
                            stallion stood, tall, scarred, imperious, swung the saddle over the
                            beast's back, and led him from the stable. Off they rode without
                            looking back, their breath steaming out before them, the path
                            flashing by, on and on and on.

                            And so the young Prince Leo rode the land in search of his once
                            friend the Heartless Giant. Three winters came and went, their
                            bitter shiver, but still he rode on, determined. And many times were
                            the saddlebags epmtied and filled; many nights slept achingly cold,
                            huddled with his horse for warmth; many days spent without sighting
                            a single soul. The boy changed slowly into man, took his own
                            counsel, his jaw set in resolve, his heart firm, his plan fixed. Yet
                            to find the Heartless Giant was no easy thing. His pillage had
                            stripped the landscape bare. Only bleached bones, spat-out ruins,
                            whispered nightmares remained. Where the Giant was no one knew. Long
                            gone, the survivers told Leo as he bent from the horse's neck. Lone
                            gone.

                            Then one day he came to a place and knew he was finally on the
                            Gaint's trail. The sweet stench of blood curdled the air. A village,
                            abandoned, smoldered and smoked. Leo's horse reared and bucked and
                            was fearful. Looking down to the earth for clues, they saw a bird
                            flap, helpless, a torn wing shuddering pitifully. The Prince set
                            down and took up the bird in his hands. "Craa! Craa! Help me!" it
                            cried. "The Giant broke me and now I cannot fly, cannot eat. Craa!
                            Help me."

                            And Leo tended the bird, fixed its wing, fed it bread soaked in
                            milk. And soon all was well with it. Leo threw it high into the air
                            and watched it soar, its vivid re-ascent. "Thank you!" cried the
                            bird from the heavens. If you need me, I shan't forget." And with
                            that a "Craa! Craa!" it flew off. And they followed.

                            Not lone after, Leo stopped at a brook, horse and rider hungry and
                            thirsty, sore and weary. As they drank, they heard a flapping, heard
                            a thrashing, heard a slapping, and, looking round, Leo saw a salmon,
                            twisting, franitic, beached in the crook of a small crevasse. "Help
                            me!" cried the choking fish. "Help me back into the water! I'm stuck
                            here, I'm stranded, I'm beached up and landed! Help me!"

                            Now Leo was famished, and he loved salmon over the taste of any
                            fish. But he'd suffered sufficient, this fellow, thought the Prince.
                            He pick up the flailing fish and swung it gently into the stream,
                            back to where the salmon is King. Off it flashed through the reeds
                            and green ripples, before leaping up in the middle of the water,
                            slapping the surface with its message. "Thank you!" it cried. "If
                            you need me, I shan't forget." Then it plunged back into the brook,
                            and they followed its zig and its zag down the stream, for that way
                            lay the Giant.

                            Now neither Leo nor his horse had eaten in days. They were faint
                            with hunger. Their progress slowed to a weary jog and stumble, until
                            at last the old stallion sank slowly to his knees and gave up the
                            ghost. Enough, he sighed, rolled over, and died. Leo lay behind his
                            faithful servant and shed tears enough to break a heart, half from
                            love, half from despair. Then he slipped into sleep. He dreamed he
                            was in his mother's bed, warm and cherished. So warm, his mother
                            mursing him, licking up his wet cheeks, hugging him. So vivid. He
                            woke hugging himself, only to find a dead horse beside him and not
                            his mother but a great Wolf coiled around his body, terrible teeth
                            glistening, tongue hanging out with hunger.

                            And, seeing his eyes flicker, the Wolf howled a terrible howl, fixed
                            on Leo's bare, unguarded throat. "Help!" howled the Wolf. "I've not
                            eaten since the winter came. Help me and I'll not forget you." Leo
                            had no food, save his own flesh. He took up his courage and spoke to
                            the Wolf, whose sour breath plaited with his own, so near they were
                            to the other's jaw. "How can I?" he replied. "I have no food
                            myself." The Wolf nudged against the dead horse. "Then let me eat
                            your horse," he panted, his tongue a vicious red swipe across his
                            teeth. "I'll eat it and be strong again. Trust me. I'll help you."
                            The Prince could not watch as the starving animal leapt upon the
                            flesh of the stallion. In no time, he eaten every scrap of flesh,
                            chewed the bones, spat them out. Leo allowed himself to single
                            glance from a distance. He caught the Wolf's red eyes contemplating
                            him, the tongue sweeping the teeth, the body crouched over a mess of
                            rib and hunk.

                            "Master. Come here," said the Wolf. Leo was resigned. "Am I next to
                            go?" he asked simply. The Wolf nodded. "Oh yes, us both must go," he
                            replied. "For you seek the Giant, I know. And now, strong again,
                            I'll help you. On my back, sir, and let's leave this place."
                            Off they went a gray dash, a day and a night and a morning, until
                            they came at last to a strange garden full of statues. Stone men.
                            Stone women. Stone soldiers. Leo slipped from Grayleg's back and
                            examined the statues. So lifelike were they, he felt a warmer sun
                            might thaw them into being. He passed the bend, supplicant figure of
                            an old woman, ivy in her stone tresses, then came to a statue of a
                            brave young warrior, sword drawn, shield raised. Leo walked round to
                            face it. "It's my brother!" he gasped. "This is a statue of my
                            brother!" Graylegs the Wolf shook his head. "No, my lord, no statue.
                            This is the Giant's work. There is his house," he continued, nodding
                            toward a clearing. "All who approach he turns to stone."

                            A little way down, the Prince came across another figure, frozen in
                            the act of straining at the longbow, arrow poised at the ear. It was
                            the Elder Brother. "You too!" cried Leo in despair. "You too."
                            At the end of the clearing was the place where the Giant lived, a
                            strange building made by tearing up the whole village and squashing
                            it into a single house. Inside, the Heartless Giant was asleep.
                            A "Rat-tat-rat-ta-ta-tat," over and over. He heaved his huge frame
                            to the patchwork of windows and looked out. Standing there,
                            fearless, without weapon, beathing his child's drum, was the young
                            Prince Leo.

                            The Giant took Leo in as his servant. The Prince explained how it
                            was discovered he had helped the Giant escape. The Giant laughed at
                            this. Had he seen his brothers, stone men in the garden? Leo said he
                            had. Any who crossed him got the same treatment, so Leo had better
                            be on his mettle. The Giant picked up the drum between his fingers
                            and tapped out the march rhythm, memories flooding back. "That
                            terrible cage," he sighed. "I had to fool you to get the keys.
                            Otherwise I'd still be there, rotting. I still limp, you know." Then
                            he squeezed Leo affectionately in his palm. "so, my little Leo, back
                            again. Hah! Yes, stay if you like. No tricks, though, to traps. Else
                            you'll end up like your brothers."

                            "No tricks, no traps," agreed the boy and went inside.
                            So Leo became the servant of the Giant. For weeks he cleaned, for
                            weeks he scoured, until spick where speck was and span where
                            squalor. Each evening, the Giant returned from his Wild outings to
                            find the fire lit, the hearth swept, his breeches pressed. He liked
                            this. Very nice. "Very nice," he'd say as he slurped and slopped his
                            stew. "I should have had a servant before. I like it." He
                            burped. "It befits a Giant." Leo bowed and cleared the plates away.
                            He was always silent, always polite, always cleaning, always
                            watching.

                            Then the Giant croaked his cracked laugh. "And don't I treat you
                            bad, do I? For a Heartless Giant." Leo kept walking away with the
                            dishes. He spoke without looking back, his words light and idly
                            curious. "What happened to your heart?"

                            Black clouds furrowed the Giant's brow. "It's in safekeeping," he
                            growled. Leo kept walking. The Giant continued, suddenly swelling,
                            thumping the place where his heart should have been: "Can't feel
                            without it, can I? Can't get hurt. Can't die from heartbreak if I
                            haven't got one. I'm invincible!" he guffawed. Leo shrugged,
                            impressed. "Clever," he said casually. "So where is it, then, your
                            heart?" Wasps streamed from the Giant's mouth. "He who pries is
                            prone to die," he warned. "Do you follow me?" "Yes." Leo walked into
                            the kitchen. Then the Giant called after him. "But I'll tell you if
                            you want to know. My heart's in that cupboard."

                            Leo was passing a huge laundry press, its old wooden doors bleached
                            and scarred with age. He paused for an instant, felt his own heart
                            pounding. There! pounded his heart; his heart is there! The
                            Heartless Giant, crouching at the table, missed nothing. He smirked,
                            belched, and slumped into an after-dinner snore.

                            Next morning, the Giant stalked off as early as ever. His prison
                            years had made him fearful of walls. Out he went, all the daylight
                            hours, roving, raging, rampaging. Leo stood at the window watching
                            him limp and lumber away. Then he rushed to the linen press, heaved
                            on the doors. Inside was a riot of this and that: a tusk, a trowel,
                            a tent, a trap, a towel, a tin, a thousand trinkets. And then boxes.
                            All manner of boxes. Leo opened them all, big or small. Two were
                            heart-shaped. He tore at them. But there was no heart. Anything but
                            hearts.

                            "I'm back," announced the Giant later that evening, tossing a brace
                            of dead pigs on the kitchen step. The Giant sniffed into the air. A
                            suspicious sniff. "What's that smell?" he demanded, his nose tilted
                            up, snorting like a bellows. Leo pointed at the gleaming doors of
                            the old cupboard. "Polish," he said. The Giant's eyes widened in
                            disbelief. "What you polishing the cupboard for?" he demanded.
                            "It's the home of your heart," declared Leo. "It should be
                            polished." The Giant roared with laughter. "Did you really think I
                            kept my heart in a cupboard? Gah!" Leo feigned a look of
                            disappointment, then went to the first pig and heaved it up on his
                            shoulders to carry into the pantry. It was still warm. "If you want
                            to know," the Giant called after him, "my heart is under the
                            step." "Right," said Leo, treading on the stone step and continuing
                            on his way. "That old step," chortled the Giant. "That's where my
                            little heart beats. Ticktock."

                            Next morning, same story: off stomped the Giant and out went the
                            Prince, pick and shovel, hack and hew, digging out the step,
                            spooning out the earth. Stone. Dust. Roots. But no heart! Ach! Poor
                            Leo. He sank down onto the step, feet in the mounds of earth, and
                            despaired. From where he sat he could see the grim silhouettes of
                            his brothers and their fellow sufferers. Waiting. Waiting for him to
                            make amends.

                            "I'm back," called the Giant, throwing down a sack, splitting it,
                            and revealing hares and hens and ducks and every type of small bird,
                            all strangled. As he limped into the house, the Giant looked down to
                            see a map of his journey recorded in huge red footprints. "What's
                            that?" he demanded as Leo appeared. "Ah, you must have trodden on
                            the step, sir," replied Leo politely. "I painted it." The Giant
                            scowled. "What did you paint that old step for?" "It covers your
                            heart, and should be special." Leo bowed. "What?" gaffawed the
                            Giant. "You're a daffle-box! You'd believe anything!" "Yes,"
                            admitted Leo. "I supposed I am, sir. I mean, I fetched the keys to
                            the dungeon thinking I could trust you, didn't I? So...yes."
                            The Giant didn't know how to take this. He wasn't sure whether he
                            should feel flattered or insulted. So he sat on his chair and
                            offered his smudged boots for Leo to remove.

                            "The fact is, no one can find my heart," he declared proudly. "I'll
                            tell you exactly where it is and you'll still not find it." Leo did
                            not look up, but continued unwinding and bootlaces as the Giant
                            unleashed a torrent of directions in a single breath. "Far away, so
                            far you could not fathom it, so high you could not climb it, is a
                            mountain, and in the mountain is a lake in the lake is an island and
                            in the island is a church and in the church is a well and in the
                            well is a duck and in the duck is an egg and in the egg...is my
                            heart."

                            The Giant poked Leo with a giant finger, bowling him over and over
                            on the flagstones. "Not so easy, little thief, eh?" he
                            declared. "Not such a diddle and a doddle as you thought, is it? No.
                            Your father tricked me once. I shan't be tricked again."

                            That night as the Giant slept, Leo lay on his cot staring at the
                            ceiling. An egg in a duck in a well in a church in an island in a
                            lake in a mountain. Impossible, he decided as he stole from the
                            house and began the journey. Impossible, he decided as he passed his
                            brothers. Impossible, he decided as he glanced at the moon and saw,
                            in its pale silver, his friend Graylegs the Wolf, raising his head
                            to the wind and howling long and loud before turning and bounding
                            towards him. In a second, they were reunited, and Leo was explaining
                            everything. He knew, he said, he knew where the Giant's heart was,
                            he knew how to get there, but the journey was hard, treacherous,
                            impossible.

                            "Hold tight," said Graylegs, offering the Prince his back. "Hold
                            fast." And very tight they young Prince held, and very fast, for a
                            gray dash they went, headlong, a breathless blur of world flashing
                            by. And they came to the mountain, clambering, scrambling. And up at
                            last. And then the lake. Wide. Deep. "Hold tight!" the Wolf cried
                            again. "Hold close." And plunge, splash into the lake, heads arched
                            up above the water, cold, soaking, chilled, choking. And out at
                            last. On the island.

                            In its center loomed the church, its spire so high it threatened to
                            tear Heaven. Leo twisted the iron handles on the massive doors. The
                            doors were locked. Nothing would budge them. Leo hammered in
                            frustration on the thick oak panels. Above them the bells rang for
                            the Angelus. They looked up at the swing and toll.

                            "Look!" cried Graylegs and, squinting into the glare, Leo saw,
                            dangling impossibly high from the bell tower, the key. Then,
                            mingling with the cling-clang-clang-clong-clang of the bells, came a
                            new note. "Craa!" it sounded. "Craa! Craa!" And from nowhere the
                            bird whose wing Leo had mended swooped past them in salute before
                            swinging up the tower with a single beat and pulling the key off its
                            thread. Seconds later, the doors swung open. Sure enough, in one
                            corner they came upon a well, and in the well swam a duck.

                            Leo clambered up onto the lip of the well and began to scatter bread
                            to tempt the duck toward his open hands. He coaxed the duck with
                            each crumb, nearer and nearer until, with a sudden lunge, he had the
                            bird firmly in his grasp. But then, just as he pulled the duck out
                            of the water, the egg dropped from its body back into the water,
                            sinking into the blackness. Leo was dumbfounded. Then, miraculously,
                            the water's skin broke and a beautful fish leapt, twisted, turned,
                            and plunged, then reappeared, slapping the water with its tail. The
                            salmon! Back it dived, vanished, surfaced to flip the egg high into
                            the air. "Catch it!" howled Graylegs at Leo. And he did. He caught
                            the Giant's heart. Held it in his hands.

                            For a second time, the Heartless Giant woke to the sound of a drum
                            playing. "Rat-tat-rat-ta-ta-tat. Rat-tat-rat-ta-ta-tat." "Where've
                            you been?" he roared in his cracked voice as he charged from the
                            house toward Leo. "I've a good mind to set you there with your
                            brothers." Leo ignored him, continued the little drum roll on his
                            drum. "Rat-tat-rat-ta-ta-tat. Rat-tat-rat-ta-ta-tat." The Giant
                            boiled. "Stop that!" he ordered. Leo did not stop, but spoke as he
                            continued to beat on his drum. "Year ago, sir, you broke my heart,"
                            he said in a quiet voice. "Now I shall break yours." And with that
                            he laid down his drum and held aloft the egg that held the Giant's
                            heart. The Giant was terrified, paralyzed.

                            "No!" he whispered. "Don't...Be careful...don't break that...please,
                            I beg you." Leo stood before him, egg pressed threateningly between
                            his palms. "I will break it," he promised. "I'll squeeze and squeeze
                            it to bits unless you release my brothers and all these poor people."
                            "Yes! Anything! Don't drop, careful, please, please be careful!" The
                            Giant seemed to shrink with each second, his voice disintegrating to
                            a sorry broken cord. "I'll do anything you ask," he promised,
                            staggering toward the stone figures. "Look! I'm doing it!" And with
                            that he limped from statue to statue, touching each one, mumbling
                            the while. As he passed, each pose melted, softened, shuddered to
                            like. Leo's brothers ran to him, praising Heaven, embracing
                            him. "Brother! You've rescued us!" they cried.

                            The Giant limped toward the three brothers. "I've done as you bid,"
                            he whispered. "Can I have my heart?" Leo nodded. "You can, sir. As I
                            promised. For I know that with your heart in place you could not be
                            as you are now." The Giant sighed. "Thank you," he said, holding out
                            his hand for the return of his heart.

                            Leo's brothers lunged at him, trapping his arms, snatching the agg
                            from his grasp. Leo yelled. The Giant groaned. "Now, villain!" the
                            brothers cried. "For five long years we've stood here helpless and
                            watched your cruelty." Leo protested, struggled. The Giant hung he
                            head, closed his eyes. "Please," he asked sadly. "Don't. Please." By
                            now, the crowds of liberated souls has surrounded the group,
                            demanding vengeance. "Kill him!" they chanted. "Kill him! Kill him!
                            Kill him!"

                            "Don't!" Leo pleaded. "I promised! Don't!" But no one heard him. His
                            elder brother advanced on the Giant and squeezed on the egg. The
                            Giant staggered back, clutching the place where his heart should
                            have been, gasping for air, short agonized gasps. The crowd roared
                            it approval. Leo wept and wept, screaming to be heard over the
                            cheering. His brother squeezed again. As he sank slowly to his
                            knees, the Giant caught Leo in a terrible gaze. "You promised," he
                            said. "You promised."

                            Then the egg burst in the elder Pince's hands, yolk and white
                            slopping him. The crowd cheered. The Giant slumped forward and died.
                            Wasps swarmed angrily from his mouth. Where the Giant fell a hill
                            grew. And in time, when much was forgotten, when many Kings had come
                            and gone, the place was still known as the Hill of the Heartless
                            Giant.

                            Prince Leo lived to be a great age, became King, had forty-two
                            grandchildren, and told them all that tale. But in his story the
                            Giant got back his heart and made amends for all his wrongs.
                            Because, you see, despite all that took place, a little boy once met
                            a Giant and they became friends."
                          • Carol
                            re:The Heartless Giant Funny, how the solution to one of the most complex riddles which Humanity will be forced to resolve, has already been successfully
                            Message 13 of 25 , Feb 17, 2007

                              re:The Heartless Giant

                               Funny, how the solution to one of the most complex riddles which Humanity will be forced to resolve, has already been successfully tackled.  Who was the soul that composed that piece, and  when?  I have already read a very abbreviated version of the ‘tale’,  but this one in all it’s details has fallen at a perfect moment…

                               

                              I enjoy taking note of ‘action on this front’,  and though the following occurred  some months ago, details of  which are not readily publicised,  I thought to dig it up and share it, at this moment.

                               

                              PRESIDENT SEES LIGHT SURROUNDING HIM    

                              http://www.iran-press-service.com/ips/articles-2005/november-2005/ahmadi_revelations_291105.shtml

                               

                              ----- Original Message -----
                              Sent: Friday, February 16, 2007 4:53 PM
                              Subject: [anthroposophy] Re: Recovering history and navigating the ZeitGeist

                              Take out your Main Lesson books Spiritual Science students.
                              Today we are offering the Giant's Heart a discourse on current
                              events.

                              Bradford brought;

                              "That is why when we look at the disturbed heart condition of Dick
                              Cheney, we understand the disturbed condition of his heart in
                              relation to the great heart of the world."

                              Bradford adds;

                              Now this is where true thinkers rise and poor thinkers fall by the
                              way side. Poor thinkers with limp souls cannot and refuse to make
                              the connection that we are about to make. The connection that we are
                              about to make is to the Giants Heart. Presently being vice president
                              of the greatest super power on the planet, the United States, makes
                              Dick Cheney a heartless Giant. Now what kind of giant is Dick
                              Cheney? What is wrong and where is his heart if it has such trouble
                              finding the rhythm and keeping beat with the heart of the world?
                              Thesee are all simple questions with surprisingly simple answers
                              that with Jungian insights and vague imaginations we certainly will
                              not find many people left in the U.S. who can digest rich insights
                              and see imaginations with the intimate clarity that students of
                              Spiritual Science may.

                              Of course we can and we have in the past brought into the argument
                              aspects of the U.S. involvement in America's fall into fascism and
                              how Dick Cheney truly plays a very significant part in where we
                              would raise the question of Ahrimanic ailments of the soul and
                              malfunctioning disconnection of a human heart to the heart of the
                              world. These Sorathian Spiritual Science and Ahrimanic patterns we
                              have traced with precise historical relationships that have picked
                              up the patterns of the dawn of 1914 and the surge of military
                              ahrimanic intent that is currently riding on the same historical
                              rhythm that led Cheney to sign and bring forward the pre-emptive
                              Imperialism of the PNAC or Project for a New Ahrimanic Century at
                              the crack of light of the dark arising of 1997/8.

                              For Cheney and big Oil middle eastern chaos must continue to erupt.
                              The world's supply of oil must be owned and kept by the United
                              States. This is U.S. policy. Pre-emptive attacks on innocent
                              countries murdering tens of thousands with escalation of torture and
                              fair trials gone the way of Nazi Germany...along with the U.S.,
                              Britain and Israel, a nasty triad that is sinking to Sorathian
                              levels of dark lodge intents, all this must continue for Amerika to
                              dominate under Cheney's heartlessness.

                              What type of imagination hovers around the leader, the actual black
                              Lodge mouthpiece of someone who cannot adjust his heart to the
                              actual heart of the world? We will present the diagnosis in a fairy
                              tale. That way those with true understanding of diagnostic pictures
                              and imaginations will have something extremely vital to point to
                              when they point to the reality behind the fall of the United States.
                              And we grant that all of us know that the real idea of terrorism is
                              not anywhere close to the representative reality of the heart of the
                              world, but if it were black ops and terrorism, it would match up
                              with what Dick Cheney wants to project all around him and America
                              with torture chambers over the globe... a Giant Darkness.

                              Now the second wave of Michael Intelligence might very well
                              understand the problems that exist in the subtext of history vs that
                              of recovering Grail history, the Etheric Christ and the human heart,
                              or the aspect of Justice and the aspect of understanding that as a
                              human being, if such a bad heart serves a dark master, it is better
                              to get a new heart and a new incarnation rather than continue on
                              with such an icy corrupt and cold heart. Dick Cheney has had his
                              heart removed.

                              The Heartless Giant

                              [Note when the word Giant appears INSERT, Dick Cheney}

                              On the whole, there's absolutely no need to be frightened by Giants.
                              Giants are gentle souls, perfectly harmless, and very affectionate.
                              Unless, of course, the Giant has no heart in his body.

                              Think of all kinds of unpleasant things and add Giant to them and
                              that's what you get when a Giant has no heart. Such a Giant once
                              terrorized a county in the far north of the world, near the very
                              top. He'd hidden his heart. It gave him too much trouble, all those
                              Giant Feelings, too much pain. In its place was a wasps' nest. About
                              to swarm. Put your ear to his chest and you'd hear an angry buzzing
                              noise.

                              This Heartless Giant could shake a man and shuffle his wits. He
                              could crack a skull with his fist like a walnut. And frequently did.
                              Until, at last, the old King of that country, as good as the Giant
                              was bad, trapped him in a giant trap and locked him in a cell. There
                              the Giant crouched, an inch of the outside world to look at, the
                              damp dripping from the walls, the dull rattle of his chains, his low
                              angry growl a ceaseless rumble through the King's castle.
                              Years passed in this was until the Giant's voice had grated away to
                              the hoarsest whisper and folk had quite forgotten about Giants with
                              no hearts. And he'd be there still, in his foul pit, were it not for
                              a little boy whose name was Leo.

                              Leo was the King's youngest son. He had two brothers who were
                              bigger. Prince Leo could leave not stone unturned, no passage
                              unexplored, no drawer unrammaged, so incurably curious was he. One
                              morning, scouting the far and deep of the castle, he came across a
                              tiny, barred window set in the bottom of a huge gray wall. Looking
                              through it, Leo saw nothing buy dank dark pitch black. But as he
                              turned away he imagined he heard a stir, and then came a growl, a
                              low buzz of a growl. It was a frightening sound.

                              His brothers told a Giant with no heart lived in this prison with
                              the tiny window. He didn't believe them. They were older, his
                              brothers, and forever teasing him. But the next day he went back,
                              carrying his drum. "Rat-tat-rat- ta-ta-tat, " he played outside the
                              window. From inside the dark dank pitch black he heard a rattle,
                              like the rattle of a chain. He crept to the window and squinted into
                              the shadows. Two eyes blinked back at him. Leo jumped. A wasp buzzed
                              angrily through the bars. Leo ran off. It was true, there was a
                              Giant!

                              All night Leo thougth about the Giant, his eyes, the low rumbling
                              growl. Next morning, he was back, "rat-tat-rat- ta-ta-tat, " on his
                              little drum. The Giant was waiting for him. When Leo tiptoed to the
                              window, he was there, whispering hello. The Giant told Leo that long
                              ago he had done some bad things and that the King had locked him up.
                              Leo couldn't imagine what these bad things were. He worried about
                              the poor Giant, stuck down there in terrible chains. He lit a candle
                              and held it to the hole.

                              The Giant was so big he had to crouch with his chin on this knees
                              and his elbos bent. He looked to Leo like a huge sad baby, his
                              yellow eyes screwed up against the candle's sudden glare. Leo said
                              he would speak to his father, it wasn't fair the Giant had been
                              locked up for so long; he must have been forgotten. "No," croaked
                              the Giant, all anxious. "If you say anything, they'll make me stay
                              down here forever and I shall surely perish." The eyes blinked
                              nearer. "Would you like to be my friend?"

                              Leo was elated. "Oh yes, yes please!" "Good. Good," said the Giant.
                              Good, thought Leo; I have a secret friend. Good, thought the Giant
                              who had shed his heart at last. And he sighed a chill sigh and
                              planned chill plans, while the young prince skipped back along the
                              path, swinging the iron gate behind him, caressing his secret,
                              nurturing it, back to his room.

                              And so it began, the friendship between the huge, crouching Giant
                              and the little Prince. Every day, the boy would appear, rat-tat-
                              tatting on his drum. Every day he'd tell a little more, hear a
                              little more, until he felt he knew no one better, that no one knew
                              him better. Oh, he wanted to tell the whole world about his friend.
                              But the Giant said, "Out secret," and Leo agreed, although he would
                              have loved to tell his mother or his two brothers or somebody. But
                              he couldn't so he shouldn't, so he wouldn't so he didn't. The Giant,
                              meanwhile crouched in his blackness and schemed. And so it was that
                              one day he told Leo he'd heard a Guard saying that the King slept
                              with the keys to the Giant's chains hanging on a ring by his bed.
                              Leo had always those keys were for the Crown Jewels. "No," said the
                              Giant. "They're for my misery." Leo felt desperate for his
                              misunderstood fiend, and a plan formed in his mind. The Giant
                              watched it being born and sighed a cold sigh. Deep inside, in the
                              prize where his heart should have been, the wasped seethed and
                              buzzed.

                              That very night, when the whole castle was sleeping, when the Royal
                              Guards slumped against their sentry posts and dozed, when the owls
                              hooted, little Prince Leo slipped from his bed, slid past a sleeping
                              sentry, and pushed on the door of his parents' room. He tiptoed
                              round the great bed with its velvet eiderdown, past his sleeping
                              mother and sleeping father, to the hook where the keys were hung.
                              They were so heavy. He heaved them up and they swung together,
                              clanging like the Angelus bell. Leo clutched them tight, their black
                              metal teeth squashing his toes, their hooped handles framing his
                              face. Slowly, slowly, inch by inch, he dragged the huge keys out of
                              the room.

                              "I've got the keys," he whispered, trembling at the little window.
                              He let them ring against the bars. "Who goes there?" challenged a
                              voice from the darkness. It was the one sentry still awake. "Hurry,
                              hurry!" growled the Giant from the bowels of the dungeon. Leo
                              struggled to push the keys through the bars. The teeth went in and
                              the long shafts, but when it came to the ring he couldn't work out
                              how to do it. "They're too big," he explained as he heard the
                              Giant's snort of impatience. "I can't do it." Leo wanted to drop the
                              keys and run for his life. "Push them," hissed the Giant. "Push
                              them!" The Giant's voice was colder than the night, it was icy. Leo
                              pushed. A great hand yanked on the keys. Leo saw its shape in the
                              shadows. He felt a terrible force pulling downward.

                              "Who goes there?" demanded the approaching voice. And then, with a
                              sudden wrench, the keys disappeared, pulling the bars with then into
                              the blackness. Leo heard a sigh issue from the Giant. A horrible
                              aching sigh. Then the turning of locks, the crushing of
                              doors. "Don't forget to let me have them back," he said, staring
                              blankly into the dungeon. He shivered again.

                              The sentry's torch was almost upon him. Suddenly the silence was
                              rent with cries. A man screamed, and there was the sound of
                              crunching, like a great walnut cracking. Then a broken, throaty
                              roar. At the far corner, a door burst from its hinges, spilling
                              light onto Leo's face. The Giant appeared. From his head, squeezing
                              at the entrance, pulling away bricks and lintels, then his
                              shoulders, squeezing, straining through. A giant baby being born
                              into the night. Leo watched, horrified. The Giant glanced at Leo,
                              but only for a second. As he emerged from the entrance, first one
                              sentry, then a second confronted him, challenging him with a sword
                              and spear. The Giant hoisted them up, one in each fist, and cracked
                              their heads together before tossing them away. Then, with the sound
                              of the alarm, the Heartless Giant turned and limped off, roaring his
                              broken roar.

                              All night Leo sat shivering on the battlements at the King and his
                              men searched the grounds of the castle. His father's angry words
                              haunted him. "Someone betrayed us. Only a madman would help a Giant
                              with no heart. Someone betrayed us." Leo's face swam with tears. So
                              letdown, he felt. So stupid. So guilty. Every scream was his fault.
                              Every cracked skull. And when finally morning came, the boy in him,
                              the innocent heart, the joy in him, they were gone-those things,
                              like his friend-and they would never return.

                              Next morning, Leo looked down and saw his Elder Brother march across
                              the courtyard. He carried his sword and his axe and his bow and a
                              large saddlebag, which he yanked up onto his shoulder. "Where are
                              you going?" Leo called down. "Sh-h-h!" warned the brother. "I am
                              going to get back the Giant." Leo felt awful. "Have you told
                              anybody?" Elder Brother shook his head proudly. "No. Of course not.
                              But I must go. Father is too old." And with this he offered up his
                              hand in salute and turned, young warrior, off to find the
                              Giant. "I'm sorry," wept his brother, but no one heard him.
                              And Elder Brother did not come back.

                              The spring came and went with sadness in it. Every day, more stories
                              reached the castle of the Giant's cruel rampage. So it was that one
                              glum morning, perched on the ledge of his window, Leo looked down
                              and saw Middle Brother striding through the courtyard, golden helmet
                              blazing, shield sparkling. "Where are you going?" Leo called
                              out. "To find our brother and to kill the Giant." Leo was beside
                              himself. "Please don't! It's madness. He has no heart." Middle
                              Brother shook his proud head. "I must go. Our father's too old now."
                              Leo could not stand it. "But he'll trick you!" he blurted
                              out. "He'll trick you!" Middle Brother would not listen. He raised
                              his hand in salute and set off to find the Giant. Terrible, Leo
                              felt, as he watched him go, terrible.

                              And Middle Brother did not come back either.

                              The summer that year was short, the winter wild and endless. One
                              day, Leo heard his mother's sobs from far off and came into her
                              bedroom to find her kneeling in sorrow, head against the green
                              velvet of the eiderdown. "Mother?" The Queen did not look up. "Your
                              father says he intends to go off and fight the Giant. "I've lost two
                              sons already. He's too old. He's too ill." She wept and wept. She
                              wanted Leo to promise he would not follow his brothers. "Promise me,
                              promise me you won't ever go." But he couldn't promise, how could
                              he? Were it not for him, the Heartless Giant would still be chained
                              and locked and safe in the dungeon.

                              Next morning, at the crack of dawn, dressed in thick leather jerkin,
                              Leo rode into the Royal Stables. He carried with him saddlebags
                              stuffed with cheese and ham and biscuits and salted beef, but no
                              weapon of any kind. He approached the stall where his father's
                              stallion stood, tall, scarred, imperious, swung the saddle over the
                              beast's back, and led him from the stable. Off they rode without
                              looking back, their breath steaming out before them, the path
                              flashing by, on and on and on.

                              And so the young Prince Leo rode the land in search of his once
                              friend the Heartless Giant. Three winters came and went, their
                              bitter shiver, but still he rode on, determined. And many times were
                              the saddlebags epmtied and filled; many nights slept achingly cold,
                              huddled with his horse for warmth; many days spent without sighting
                              a single soul. The boy changed slowly into man, took his own
                              counsel, his jaw set in resolve, his heart firm, his plan fixed. Yet
                              to find the Heartless Giant was no easy thing. His pillage had
                              stripped the landscape bare. Only bleached bones, spat-out ruins,
                              whispered nightmares remained. Where the Giant was no one knew. Long
                              gone, the survivers told Leo as he bent from the horse's neck. Lone
                              gone.

                              Then one day he came to a place and knew he was finally on the
                              Gaint's trail. The sweet stench of blood curdled the air. A village,
                              abandoned, smoldered and smoked. Leo's horse reared and bucked and
                              was fearful. Looking down to the earth for clues, they saw a bird
                              flap, helpless, a torn wing shuddering pitifully. The Prince set
                              down and took up the bird in his hands. "Craa! Craa! Help me!" it
                              cried. "The Giant broke me and now I cannot fly, cannot eat. Craa!
                              Help me."

                              And Leo tended the bird, fixed its wing, fed it bread soaked in
                              milk. And soon all was well with it. Leo threw it high into the air
                              and watched it soar, its vivid re-ascent. "Thank you!" cried the
                              bird from the heavens. If you need me, I shan't forget." And with
                              that a "Craa! Craa!" it flew off. And they followed.

                              Not lone after, Leo stopped at a brook, horse and rider hungry and
                              thirsty, sore and weary. As they drank, they heard a flapping, heard
                              a thrashing, heard a slapping, and, looking round, Leo saw a salmon,
                              twisting, franitic, beached in the crook of a small crevasse. "Help
                              me!" cried the choking fish. "Help me back into the water! I'm stuck
                              here, I'm stranded, I'm beached up and landed! Help me!"

                              Now Leo was famished, and he loved salmon over the taste of any
                              fish. But he'd suffered sufficient, this fellow, thought the Prince.
                              He pick up the flailing fish and swung it gently into the stream,
                              back to where the salmon is King. Off it flashed through the reeds
                              and green ripples, before leaping up in the middle of the water,
                              slapping the surface with its message. "Thank you!" it cried. "If
                              you need me, I shan't forget." Then it plunged back into the brook,
                              and they followed its zig and its zag down the stream, for that way
                              lay the Giant.

                              Now neither Leo nor his horse had eaten in days. They were faint
                              with hunger. Their progress slowed to a weary jog and stumble, until
                              at last the old stallion sank slowly to his knees and gave up the
                              ghost. Enough, he sighed, rolled over, and died. Leo lay behind his
                              faithful servant and shed tears enough to break a heart, half from
                              love, half from despair. Then he slipped into sleep. He dreamed he
                              was in his mother's bed, warm and cherished. So warm, his mother
                              mursing him, licking up his wet cheeks, hugging him. So vivid. He
                              woke hugging himself, only to find a dead horse beside him and not
                              his mother but a great Wolf coiled around his body, terrible teeth
                              glistening, tongue hanging out with hunger.

                              And, seeing his eyes flicker, the Wolf howled a terrible howl, fixed
                              on Leo's bare, unguarded throat. "Help!" howled the Wolf. "I've not
                              eaten since the winter came. Help me and I'll not forget you." Leo
                              had no food, save his own flesh. He took up his courage and spoke to
                              the Wolf, whose sour breath plaited with his own, so near they were
                              to the other's jaw. "How can I?" he replied. "I have no food
                              myself." The Wolf nudged against the dead horse. "Then let me eat
                              your horse," he panted, his tongue a vicious red swipe across his
                              teeth. "I'll eat it and be strong again. Trust me. I'll help you."
                              The Prince could not watch as the starving animal leapt upon the
                              flesh of the stallion. In no time, he eaten every scrap of flesh,
                              chewed the bones, spat them out. Leo allowed himself to single
                              glance from a distance. He caught the Wolf's red eyes contemplating
                              him, the tongue sweeping the teeth, the body crouched over a mess of
                              rib and hunk.

                              "Master. Come here," said the Wolf. Leo was resigned. "Am I next to
                              go?" he asked simply. The Wolf nodded. "Oh yes, us both must go," he
                              replied. "For you seek the Giant, I know. And now, strong again,
                              I'll help you. On my back, sir, and let's leave this place."
                              Off they went a gray dash, a day and a night and a morning, until
                              they came at last to a strange garden full of statues. Stone men.
                              Stone women. Stone soldiers. Leo slipped from Grayleg's back and
                              examined the statues. So lifelike were they, he felt a warmer sun
                              might thaw them into being. He passed the bend, supplicant figure of
                              an old woman, ivy in her stone tresses, then came to a statue of a
                              brave young warrior, sword drawn, shield raised. Leo walked round to
                              face it. "It's my brother!" he gasped. "This is a statue of my
                              brother!" Graylegs the Wolf shook his head. "No, my lord, no statue.
                              This is the Giant's work. There is his house," he continued, nodding
                              toward a clearing. "All who approach he turns to stone."

                              A little way down, the Prince came across another figure, frozen in
                              the act of straining at the longbow, arrow poised at the ear. It was
                              the Elder Brother. "You too!" cried Leo in despair. "You too."
                              At the end of the clearing was the place where the Giant lived, a
                              strange building made by tearing up the whole village and squashing
                              it into a single house. Inside, the Heartless Giant was asleep.
                              A "Rat-tat-rat- ta-ta-tat, " over and over. He heaved his huge frame
                              to the patchwork of windows and looked out. Standing there,
                              fearless, without weapon, beathing his child's drum, was the young
                              Prince Leo.

                              The Giant took Leo in as his servant. The Prince explained how it
                              was discovered he had helped the Giant escape. The Giant laughed at
                              this. Had he seen his brothers, stone men in the garden? Leo said he
                              had. Any who crossed him got the same treatment, so Leo had better
                              be on his mettle. The Giant picked up the drum between his fingers
                              and tapped out the march rhythm, memories flooding back. "That
                              terrible cage," he sighed. "I had to fool you to get the keys.
                              Otherwise I'd still be there, rotting. I still limp, you know." Then
                              he squeezed Leo affectionately in his palm. "so, my little Leo, back
                              again. Hah! Yes, stay if you like. No tricks, though, to traps. Else
                              you'll end up like your brothers."

                              "No tricks, no traps," agreed the boy and went inside.
                              So Leo became the servant of the Giant. For weeks he cleaned, for
                              weeks he scoured, until spick where speck was and span where
                              squalor. Each evening, the Giant returned from his Wild outings to
                              find the fire lit, the hearth swept, his breeches pressed. He liked
                              this. Very nice. "Very nice," he'd say as he slurped and slopped his
                              stew. "I should have had a servant before. I like it." He
                              burped. "It befits a Giant." Leo bowed and cleared the plates away.
                              He was always silent, always polite, always cleaning, always
                              watching.

                              Then the Giant croaked his cracked laugh. "And don't I treat you
                              bad, do I? For a Heartless Giant." Leo kept walking away with the
                              dishes. He spoke without looking back, his words light and idly
                              curious. "What happened to your heart?"

                              Black clouds furrowed the Giant's brow. "It's in safekeeping, " he
                              growled. Leo kept walking. The Giant continued, suddenly swelling,
                              thumping the place where his heart should have been: "Can't feel
                              without it, can I? Can't get hurt. Can't die from heartbreak if I
                              haven't got one. I'm invincible!" he guffawed. Leo shrugged,
                              impressed. "Clever," he said casually. "So where is it, then, your
                              heart?" Wasps streamed from the Giant's mouth. "He who pries is
                              prone to die," he warned. "Do you follow me?" "Yes." Leo walked into
                              the kitchen. Then the Giant called after him. "But I'll tell you if
                              you want to know. My heart's in that cupboard."

                              Leo was passing a huge laundry press, its old wooden doors bleached
                              and scarred with age. He paused for an instant, felt his own heart
                              pounding. There! pounded his heart; his heart is there! The
                              Heartless Giant, crouching at the table, missed nothing. He smirked,
                              belched, and slumped into an after-dinner snore.

                              Next morning, the Giant stalked off as early as ever. His prison
                              years had made him fearful of walls. Out he went, all the daylight
                              hours, roving, raging, rampaging. Leo stood at the window watching
                              him limp and lumber away. Then he rushed to the linen press, heaved
                              on the doors. Inside was a riot of this and that: a tusk, a trowel,
                              a tent, a trap, a towel, a tin, a thousand trinkets. And then boxes.
                              All manner of boxes. Leo opened them all, big or small. Two were
                              heart-shaped. He tore at them. But there was no heart. Anything but
                              hearts.

                              "I'm back," announced the Giant later that evening, tossing a brace
                              of dead pigs on the kitchen step. The Giant sniffed into the air. A
                              suspicious sniff. "What's that smell?" he demanded, his nose tilted
                              up, snorting like a bellows. Leo pointed at the gleaming doors of
                              the old cupboard. "Polish," he said. The Giant's eyes widened in
                              disbelief. "What you polishing the cupboard for?" he demanded.
                              "It's the home of your heart," declared Leo. "It should be
                              polished." The Giant roared with laughter. "Did you really think I
                              kept my heart in a cupboard? Gah!" Leo feigned a look of
                              disappointment, then went to the first pig and heaved it up on his
                              shoulders to carry into the pantry. It was still warm. "If you want
                              to know," the Giant called after him, "my heart is under the
                              step." "Right," said Leo, treading on the stone step and continuing
                              on his way. "That old step," chortled the Giant. "That's where my
                              little heart beats. Ticktock."

                              Next morning, same story: off stomped the Giant and out went the
                              Prince, pick and shovel, hack and hew, digging out the step,
                              spooning out the earth. Stone. Dust. Roots. But no heart! Ach! Poor
                              Leo. He sank down onto the step, feet in the mounds of earth, and
                              despaired. From where he sat he could see the grim silhouettes of
                              his brothers and their fellow sufferers. Waiting. Waiting for him to
                              make amends.

                              "I'm back," called the Giant, throwing down a sack, splitting it,
                              and revealing hares and hens and ducks and every type of small bird,
                              all strangled. As he limped into the house, the Giant looked down to
                              see a map of his journey recorded in huge red footprints. "What's
                              that?" he demanded as Leo appeared. "Ah, you must have trodden on
                              the step, sir," replied Leo politely. "I painted it." The Giant
                              scowled. "What did you paint that old step for?" "It covers your
                              heart, and should be special." Leo bowed. "What?" gaffawed the
                              Giant. "You're a daffle-box! You'd believe anything!" "Yes,"
                              admitted Leo. "I supposed I am, sir. I mean, I fetched the keys to
                              the dungeon thinking I could trust you, didn't I? So...yes."
                              The Giant didn't know how to take this. He wasn't sure whether he
                              should feel flattered or insulted. So he sat on his chair and
                              offered his smudged boots for Leo to remove.

                              "The fact is, no one can find my heart," he declared proudly. "I'll
                              tell you exactly where it is and you'll still not find it." Leo did
                              not look up, but continued unwinding and bootlaces as the Giant
                              unleashed a torrent of directions in a single breath. "Far away, so
                              far you could not fathom it, so high you could not climb it, is a
                              mountain, and in the mountain is a lake in the lake is an island and
                              in the island is a church and in the church is a well and in the
                              well is a duck and in the duck is an egg and in the egg...is my
                              heart."

                              The Giant poked Leo with a giant finger, bowling him over and over
                              on the flagstones. "Not so easy, little thief, eh?" he
                              declared. "Not such a diddle and a doddle as you thought, is it? No.
                              Your father tricked me once. I shan't be tricked again."

                              That night as the Giant slept, Leo lay on his cot staring at the
                              ceiling. An egg in a duck in a well in a church in an island in a
                              lake in a mountain. Impossible, he decided as he stole from the
                              house and began the journey. Impossible, he decided as he passed his
                              brothers. Impossible, he decided as he glanced at the moon and saw,
                              in its pale silver, his friend Graylegs the Wolf, raising his head
                              to the wind and howling long and loud before turning and bounding
                              towards him. In a second, they were reunited, and Leo was explaining
                              everything. He knew, he said, he knew where the Giant's heart was,
                              he knew how to get there, but the journey was hard, treacherous,
                              impossible.

                              "Hold tight," said Graylegs, offering the Prince his back. "Hold
                              fast." And very tight they young Prince held, and very fast, for a
                              gray dash they went, headlong, a breathless blur of world flashing
                              by. And they came to the mountain, clambering, scrambling. And up at
                              last. And then the lake. Wide. Deep. "Hold tight!" the Wolf cried
                              again. "Hold close." And plunge, splash into the lake, heads arched
                              up above the water, cold, soaking, chilled, choking. And out at
                              last. On the island.

                              In its center loomed the church, its spire so high it threatened to
                              tear Heaven. Leo twisted the iron handles on the massive doors. The
                              doors were locked. Nothing would budge them. Leo hammered in
                              frustration on the thick oak panels. Above them the bells rang for
                              the Angelus. They looked up at the swing and toll.

                              "Look!" cried Graylegs and, squinting into the glare, Leo saw,
                              dangling impossibly high from the bell tower, the key. Then,
                              mingling with the cling-clang- clang-clong- clang of the bells, came a
                              new note. "Craa!" it sounded. "Craa! Craa!" And from nowhere the
                              bird whose wing Leo had mended swooped past them in salute before
                              swinging up the tower with a single beat and pulling the key off its
                              thread. Seconds later, the doors swung open. Sure enough, in one
                              corner they came upon a well, and in the well swam a duck.

                              Leo clambered up onto the lip of the well and began to scatter bread
                              to tempt the duck toward his open hands. He coaxed the duck with
                              each crumb, nearer and nearer until, with a sudden lunge, he had the
                              bird firmly in his grasp. But then, just as he pulled the duck out
                              of the water, the egg dropped from its body back into the water,
                              sinking into the blackness. Leo was dumbfounded. Then, miraculously,
                              the water's skin broke and a beautful fish leapt, twisted, turned,
                              and plunged, then reappeared, slapping the water with its tail. The
                              salmon! Back it dived, vanished, surfaced to flip the egg high into
                              the air. "Catch it!" howled Graylegs at Leo. And he did. He caught
                              the Giant's heart. Held it in his hands.

                              For a second time, the Heartless Giant woke to the sound of a drum
                              playing. "Rat-tat-rat- ta-ta-tat. Rat-tat-rat- ta-ta-tat. " "Where've
                              you been?" he roared in his cracked voice as he charged from the
                              house toward Leo. "I've a good mind to set you there with your
                              brothers." Leo ignored him, continued the little drum roll on his
                              drum. "Rat-tat-rat- ta-ta-tat. Rat-tat-rat- ta-ta-tat. " The Giant
                              boiled. "Stop that!" he ordered. Leo did not stop, but spoke as he
                              continued to beat on his drum. "Year ago, sir, you broke my heart,"
                              he said in a quiet voice. "Now I shall break yours." And with that
                              he laid down his drum and held aloft the egg that held the Giant's
                              heart. The Giant was terrified, paralyzed.

                              "No!" he whispered. "Don't...Be careful...don' t break that...please,
                              I beg you." Leo stood before him, egg pressed threateningly between
                              his palms. "I will break it," he promised. "I'll squeeze and squeeze
                              it to bits unless you release my brothers and all these poor people."
                              "Yes! Anything! Don't drop, careful, please, please be careful!" The
                              Giant seemed to shrink with each second, his voice disintegrating to
                              a sorry broken cord. "I'll do anything you ask," he promised,
                              staggering toward the stone figures. "Look! I'm doing it!" And with
                              that he limped from statue to statue, touching each one, mumbling
                              the while. As he passed, each pose melted, softened, shuddered to
                              like. Leo's brothers ran to him, praising Heaven, embracing
                              him. "Brother! You've rescued us!" they cried.

                              The Giant limped toward the three brothers. "I've done as you bid,"
                              he whispered. "Can I have my heart?" Leo nodded. "You can, sir. As I
                              promised. For I know that with your heart in place you could not be
                              as you are now." The Giant sighed. "Thank you," he said, holding out
                              his hand for the return of his heart.

                              Leo's brothers lunged at him, trapping his arms, snatching the agg
                              from his grasp. Leo yelled. The Giant groaned. "Now, villain!" the
                              brothers cried. "For five long years we've stood here helpless and
                              watched your cruelty." Leo protested, struggled. The Giant hung he
                              head, closed his eyes. "Please," he asked sadly. "Don't. Please." By
                              now, the crowds of liberated souls has surrounded the group,
                              demanding vengeance. "Kill him!" they chanted. "Kill him! Kill him!
                              Kill him!"

                              "Don't!" Leo pleaded. "I promised! Don't!" But no one heard him. His
                              elder brother advanced on the Giant and squeezed on the egg. The
                              Giant staggered back, clutching the place where his heart should
                              have been, gasping for air, short agonized gasps. The crowd roared
                              it approval. Leo wept and wept, screaming to be heard over the
                              cheering. His brother squeezed again. As he sank slowly to his
                              knees, the Giant caught Leo in a terrible gaze. "You promised," he
                              said. "You promised."

                              Then the egg burst in the elder Pince's hands, yolk and white
                              slopping him. The crowd cheered. The Giant slumped forward and died.
                              Wasps swarmed angrily from his mouth. Where the Giant fell a hill
                              grew. And in time, when much was forgotten, when many Kings had come
                              and gone, the place was still known as the Hill of the Heartless
                              Giant.

                              Prince Leo lived to be a great age, became King, had forty-two
                              grandchildren, and told them all that tale. But in his story the
                              Giant got back his heart and made amends for all his wrongs.
                              Because, you see, despite all that took place, a little boy once met
                              a Giant and they became friends."

                            • holderlin66
                              Profile in Ahrimanic intrusion and Soul overshadowing. The Voice of the White House Washington, D.C., March 18, 2007: Early last week, I was having dinner
                              Message 14 of 25 , Mar 20, 2007
                                Profile in Ahrimanic intrusion and Soul overshadowing.

                                The Voice of the White House

                                "Washington, D.C., March 18, 2007: "Early last week, I was having
                                dinner with an old friend of my wife's who works for the Justice
                                Department as an analyst. During the course of the meal, he
                                mentioned a lengthy report he has on his desk about Vice President
                                Cheney. It was compiled by a Department individual, known to him and
                                considered to be very accurate.

                                It is a lengthy report on Cheney's psychological makeup, his
                                physical problems and a clear rationale for his very possible death,
                                probably in the near future.

                                It is not a state secret that Cheney is in very bad health. He had
                                suffered, to date, four major and three minor heart attacks, he has
                                had quadruple bypass surgery, a pacemaker installed and two
                                angioplasty surgical procedures (to clear badly plugged arteries.)
                                The last available, but certainly not public, medical prognosis is
                                that it would take very little for Cheney to have a final, and
                                fatal, heart attack.

                                The recent discovery that Cheney suffered a blood clot in his leg
                                and has undergone both a medical intervention and is now receiving
                                anticoagulant medicines in addition to a significant regimen of
                                other medications aimed at controlling his very high blood pressure
                                and equally high cholesterol levels. He has been told by his
                                doctors to lose at least 30 pounds, to be very careful of his diet
                                and to engage in physical exercise, designed to improve circulation,
                                on a daily basis. His age, lack of exercise and weight problems
                                coupled with his psychological makeup are inevitably going to kill
                                him, sooner rather than later.

                                Cheney's psychological makeup is a contributory factor to his
                                ongoing and escalating circulation problems.

                                He has an obsessive/compulsive personality that internalizes
                                stressful episodes. Cheney has always been the powerful and driving
                                force behind Bush's disastrous Mid East policies. Cheney is a
                                fixated Cold War personality who hates and fears the Russians,
                                believing that they are still Communists, bent on the destruction of
                                the United States. Cheney is also determined to enrich himself via
                                his stock options with Halliburton, the oil company. Due solely to
                                his actions in giving Halliburton many highly lucrative, no-bid
                                government contracts, Cheney has effectively boosted the value of
                                Halliburton's stock and he now holds a significant number of stock
                                options in that company, which he once ran, which, if liquidated,
                                would make him very rich.

                                He has instigated a number of CIA operations against the Russian
                                Republic, designed to gain US control over former Soviet republics
                                that are rich in oil or who possess territory over which immensely
                                profitable oil and gas pipelines must pass in order for these
                                resources to reach western markets.

                                Cheney hates Russian President Putin because he sees Putin as a man
                                who deliberately thwarted US plans to gain control over Russian oil
                                and gas resources via the actions of the so-called Russian
                                Oligarchs. The latter were all Jews and working with an Israeli-
                                controlled bank in New York and with the cooperation of their co-
                                religionists in the IMF and the World Bank, came very close to
                                achieving this control.

                                Putin is now seen by Cheney and his associates as the one force
                                blocking a renewal of US business control over Russian natural
                                resources and Cheney has made no attempt to conceal his fury and
                                frustration over what he sees as a major business and political
                                defeat.

                                In addition to this problem, Cheney's failing plans to set up a
                                permanent US military base in oil-rich Iraq to secure the area and,
                                in addition, serve as a badly-needed bulwark for an Israel who
                                hates, and is afraid of, many of her very hostile Arab neighbors has
                                added immensely to what has been a stressful career.

                                I knew Cheney during the Reagan years in power and even then he was
                                a driven man, obsessive in his attitudes, completely intolerant of
                                any opinions that ran counter to his os own and determined to be
                                the man whose decisions were the only correct ones and therefore
                                must be implemented. Our of the government, he longed to return to
                                the corridors of power and when he was asked to chair a committee to
                                find a suitable vice president for the Supreme Court-appointed Bush,
                                he naturally chose himself.

                                His aides have often spoken, sometimes in my presence, about
                                Cheney's contempt for what he sees as a weak and spineless president
                                but he realizes that he is incapable of becoming chief of state
                                though he once said,,,"If someone nails George, then you'll see some
                                royal ass-kicking!"

                                Cheney's personal drive and his complete dominance over a weak
                                president, coupled with the vicious and vindictive manipulations of
                                Karl Rove, Bush's poison dwarf, have wreaked havoc on the American
                                diplomatic, military, political and now, economic, structures but he
                                will never give up and never leave his White House office except on
                                a gurney.

                                He has been further stressed by the departure and subsequent
                                conviction of I. Lewis Libby, one of his closest associates and a
                                good friend. Cheney in triumph was a study in arrogance and power
                                but Cheney in growing defeat will only turn his rage and frustration
                                inwards and, given his serious medical problems, is a certain
                                candidate for an imminent state funeral.

                                This may sound cruel on my part, but given the damage Dick Cheney
                                has done, and is capable of doing, his passing would be a blessing
                                for the people of the United States and, indeed, the world."

                                The Heartless Giant ---- Can be read from earlier post

                                [Note when the word Giant appears INSERT, Dick Cheney}

                                On the whole, there's absolutely no need to be frightened by Giants.
                                Giants are gentle souls, perfectly harmless, and very affectionate.
                                Unless, of course, the Giant has no heart in his body.

                                Think of all kinds of unpleasant things and add Giant to them and
                                that's what you get when a Giant has no heart. Such a Giant once
                                terrorized a county in the far north of the world, near the very
                                top. He'd hidden his heart. It gave him too much trouble, all those
                                Giant Feelings, too much pain. In its place was a wasps' nest. About
                                to swarm. Put your ear to his chest and you'd hear an angry buzzing
                                noise.

                                This Heartless Giant could shake a man and shuffle his wits. He
                                could crack a skull with his fist like a walnut. And frequently did.
                                Until, at last, the old King of that country, as good as the Giant
                                was bad, trapped him in a giant trap and locked him in a cell. There
                                the Giant crouched, an inch of the outside world to look at, the
                                damp dripping from the walls, the dull rattle of his chains, his low
                                angry growl a ceaseless rumble through the King's castle.
                                Years passed in this was until the Giant's voice had grated away to
                                the hoarsest whisper and folk had quite forgotten about Giants with
                                no hearts. And he'd be there still, in his foul pit, were it not for
                                a little boy whose name was Leo.

                                Leo was the King's youngest son. He had two brothers who were
                                bigger. Prince Leo could leave not stone unturned, no passage
                                unexplored, no drawer unrammaged, so incurably curious was he. One
                                morning, scouting the far and deep of the castle, he came across a
                                tiny, barred window set in the bottom of a huge gray wall. Looking
                                through it, Leo saw nothing buy dank dark pitch black. But as he
                                turned away he imagined he heard a stir, and then came a growl, a
                                low buzz of a growl. It was a frightening sound.

                                His brothers told a Giant with no heart lived in this prison with
                                the tiny window. He didn't believe them. They were older, his
                                brothers, and forever teasing him. But the next day he went back,
                                carrying his drum. "Rat-tat-rat-ta-ta-tat," he played outside the
                                window. From inside the dark dank pitch black he heard a rattle,
                                like the rattle of a chain. He crept to the window and squinted into
                                the shadows. Two eyes blinked back at him. Leo jumped. A wasp buzzed
                                angrily through the bars. Leo ran off. It was true, there was a
                                Giant!

                                All night Leo thougth about the Giant, his eyes, the low rumbling
                                growl. Next morning, he was back, "rat-tat-rat-ta-ta-tat," on his
                                little drum. The Giant was waiting for him. When Leo tiptoed to the
                                window, he was there, whispering hello. The Giant told Leo that long
                                ago he had done some bad things and that the King had locked him up.
                                Leo couldn't imagine what these bad things were. He worried about
                                the poor Giant, stuck down there in terrible chains. He lit a candle
                                and held it to the hole.

                                The Giant was so big he had to crouch with his chin on this knees
                                and his elbos bent. He looked to Leo like a huge sad baby, his
                                yellow eyes screwed up against the candle's sudden glare. Leo said
                                he would speak to his father, it wasn't fair the Giant had been
                                locked up for so long; he must have been forgotten. "No," croaked
                                the Giant, all anxious. "If you say anything, they'll make me stay
                                down here forever and I shall surely perish." The eyes blinked
                                nearer. "Would you like to be my friend?"

                                Leo was elated. "Oh yes, yes please!" "Good. Good," said the Giant.
                                Good, thought Leo; I have a secret friend. Good, thought the Giant
                                who had shed his heart at last. And he sighed a chill sigh and
                                planned chill plans, while the young prince skipped back along the
                                path, swinging the iron gate behind him, caressing his secret,
                                nurturing it, back to his room.

                                And so it began, the friendship between the huge, crouching Giant
                                and the little Prince. Every day, the boy would appear, rat-tat-
                                tatting on his drum. Every day he'd tell a little more, hear a
                                little more, until he felt he knew no one better, that no one knew
                                him better. Oh, he wanted to tell the whole world about his friend.
                                But the Giant said, "Out secret," and Leo agreed, although he would
                                have loved to tell his mother or his two brothers or somebody. But
                                he couldn't so he shouldn't, so he wouldn't so he didn't. The Giant,
                                meanwhile crouched in his blackness and schemed. And so it was that
                                one day he told Leo he'd heard a Guard saying that the King slept
                                with the keys to the Giant's chains hanging on a ring by his bed.
                                Leo had always those keys were for the Crown Jewels. "No," said the
                                Giant. "They're for my misery." Leo felt desperate for his
                                misunderstood fiend, and a plan formed in his mind. The Giant
                                watched it being born and sighed a cold sigh. Deep inside, in the
                                prize where his heart should have been, the wasped seethed and
                                buzzed.

                                That very night, when the whole castle was sleeping, when the Royal
                                Guards slumped against their sentry posts and dozed, when the owls
                                hooted, little Prince Leo slipped from his bed, slid past a sleeping
                                sentry, and pushed on the door of his parents' room. He tiptoed
                                round the great bed with its velvet eiderdown, past his sleeping
                                mother and sleeping father, to the hook where the keys were hung.
                                They were so heavy. He heaved them up and they swung together,
                                clanging like the Angelus bell. Leo clutched them tight, their black
                                metal teeth squashing his toes, their hooped handles framing his
                                face. Slowly, slowly, inch by inch, he dragged the huge keys out of
                                the room.

                                "I've got the keys," he whispered, trembling at the little window.
                                He let them ring against the bars. "Who goes there?" challenged a
                                voice from the darkness. It was the one sentry still awake. "Hurry,
                                hurry!" growled the Giant from the bowels of the dungeon. Leo
                                struggled to push the keys through the bars. The teeth went in and
                                the long shafts, but when it came to the ring he couldn't work out
                                how to do it. "They're too big," he explained as he heard the
                                Giant's snort of impatience. "I can't do it." Leo wanted to drop the
                                keys and run for his life. "Push them," hissed the Giant. "Push
                                them!" The Giant's voice was colder than the night, it was icy. Leo
                                pushed. A great hand yanked on the keys. Leo saw its shape in the
                                shadows. He felt a terrible force pulling downward...."
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