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Re: [anthroposophy] Dr. Albert Schweitzer's Last Letter: Reverence For Life

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  • elaine upton
    Hello starman and all, Thanks for this piece from Schweitzer. I was once in Strasbourg, and had some feeling of this inner quiet that comes through in this
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 11, 2000
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      Hello starman and all,

      Thanks for this piece from Schweitzer. I was once in Strasbourg, and had
      some feeling of this inner quiet that comes through in this piece on
      REVERENCE FOR LIFE, Sacrifice, Goethe, and Mohandas Gandhi.

      What he says on Reverence for Life reminds me of what the Lakota and other
      native americans say as a prayer: (in Lakota) "Mitaquye Oyasin."

      (translated: For All My Relations, or May It Be For All My Relations
      --meaning, winged, four footed, two footed, crawling, swimming, and stones,
      plants, stars...)

      And Goethe and the quest to find humanity, the truth of one's innermost
      being --lovely.

      Sacrifice? I think that is a word that often is misunderstood today. It's
      actually a lovely word. Making sacred. Rearranging the energies, so that
      there is balance and one is not happy at the expense of others.

      Which reminds me of some of the latest expressed news (its not latest at
      all, in reality, but only latest in the current major media): I refer to the
      news of the epidemic of AIDS in Africa, where Schweitzer spent so much of
      his life practicing the healing arts. The average life expectancy in some
      African countries is expected to be 30 by the year 2010 (in countries south,
      like South Africa, where i lived;Zimbabwe; Kenya;Lesotho, etc.).--These
      people's means of livelihood has dwindled. The land is raped. There is great
      poverty and great suffering. For me, this raises questions of
      *sacrifice*--rebalancing of world energies, where some have so much and some
      have nothing at all, where some prosper, materially, and others suffer
      materially/spiritually.

      May the brotherhood Schweitzer speaks of (and sisterhood) somehow return and
      prevail under the African skies, through the thinking, feeling,
      willing--yes, the willing/engagement-- in Christ (for those who choose).

      Peace, thanksgiving,
      elaine



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