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Thus Spake ... Who?

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  • joksu57
    Hello all! One of my friends was talking about a TV-document conserning the old zoroastrian religion, and then a thought popped to my mind about Nietzche and
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 8, 2004
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      Hello all!

      One of my friends was talking about a TV-document conserning the old
      zoroastrian religion, and then a thought popped to my mind about
      Nietzche and Zarathustra:

      But first a short clip from an "old" site:
      http://www.vermontel.com/~vtsophia/zodtrop2.htm

      "The holy book of the Zoroastrians is the AVESTA, which like the
      Hindu VEDAS, codifies the much earlier oral teachings that existed
      for thousands of years before the book. The Persian cultural epoch
      lasted from 5076 BC to 2907 BC and Zarathustra was the prophet
      appointed by the solar deity. The general schema of Mazdean cosmology
      reflects the tropical zodiac structure of the phases of the
      declination of light. The Persian wisdom was very simplistic and
      separated the universe into two halves, one of light, represented in
      the tropical zodiac as the passage from the vernal equinox thru the
      summer solstice to the autumnal equinox, and one of darkness,
      represented in the tropical zodiac as the passage from the autumnal
      equinox thru the winter solstice to the vernal equinox.

      The Avestan Ahura Mazda, later in the 9th century texts, Ohrmazd, was
      the appointed "Lord of Wisdom" and he ruled the height of the heavens
      of light. His appointed antagonist was the Avestan, Angra Mainyu,
      later called Ahriman." (End of quote)

      Dr. Steiner have teached about the close connection between Ahriman
      and Nietzche; Ahriman was able to "take his abode" in the brains of
      Nietzche. Now one of the main works of Nietzche is "Thus Spake
      Zarathustra". There is something typically ahrimanic in this title of
      the book (Ahriman is also called "the father of lies"). A better name
      could have been: Thus Spake Ahriman. But there is also some grain of
      thruth in the original name, because Zarathustra spoke also about
      Ahriman. Well, mixing some thruth with lies is much more efficient
      way of deceiving people.

      Joksu
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