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Re: [anosmia] disability?

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  • JOANNECORDERO@aol.com
    True but sad Becky, Unless you are a chef you can work. I loved cooking, now it s............ It can be dangerous, fires, gas smells. A drunk homeless man
    Message 1 of 24 , Oct 25, 2010
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      True but sad Becky,

      Unless you are a chef you can work.  I loved cooking, now it's............

      It can be dangerous, fires, gas smells.  A drunk homeless man sat next to 
      me on the train, he told me he knew he smelled terrible and thanked me for
      not changing my seat. 

      It's not considered a disability.  When I hug my son and can't smell his warm
      familiar scent, I do feel disabled.



      -----Original Message-----
      From: Jan <janpinf@...>
      To: anosmia@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Mon, Oct 25, 2010 12:34 pm
      Subject: [anosmia] disability?

       
      Hi Becky,

      I've no idea what an ADA is.
      But anosmia isn't generally recognised as a disability anywhere since it has no impact at all on your ability to earn a living and support yourself.

      It's distressing, but it's not disabling.

      Sorry,
      Jan

      --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, Becky Fairchild <beckyfairchild95@...> wrote:
      >
      > Does anyone know if Anosmia is recognized as a disibility by the ADA?
      >

    • Jan
      And even if you are/were a chef, you can work. Nobody ever guaranteed that any particular person would work as a chef. There are many other types of work.
      Message 2 of 24 , Oct 25, 2010
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        And even if you are/were a chef, you can work.
        Nobody ever guaranteed that any particular person would work as a chef.
        There are many other types of work.

        Infertility has had much more impact on my life than anosmia has.
        But quite rightly, that's not regarded as a disability either.

        Jan



        --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, JOANNECORDERO@... wrote:
        >
        > True but sad Becky,
        >
        >
        > Unless you are a chef you can work. I loved cooking, now it's............
        >
        >
        > It can be dangerous, fires, gas smells. A drunk homeless man sat next to
        > me on the train, he told me he knew he smelled terrible and thanked me for
        > not changing my seat.
        >
        >
        > It's not considered a disability. When I hug my son and can't smell his warm
        > familiar scent, I do feel disabled.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: Jan <janpinf@...>
        > To: anosmia@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Mon, Oct 25, 2010 12:34 pm
        > Subject: [anosmia] disability?
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Hi Becky,
        >
        > I've no idea what an ADA is.
        > But anosmia isn't generally recognised as a disability anywhere since it has no impact at all on your ability to earn a living and support yourself.
        >
        > It's distressing, but it's not disabling.
        >
        > Sorry,
        > Jan
        >
        > --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, Becky Fairchild <beckyfairchild95@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Does anyone know if Anosmia is recognized as a disibility by the ADA?
        > >
        >
      • LizRM
        So why is Anosmia now recognised to be a disability which it quite clearly is? I was a Science Teacher, if anyone had asked if I was able to detect gas leaks
        Message 3 of 24 , Oct 25, 2010
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          So why is Anosmia now recognised to be a disability which it quite clearly is?
          I was a Science Teacher, if anyone had asked if I was able to detect gas leaks then I might not have been employed!!
          A police officer who couldnt tell if a Driver had been drinking  or having taken drugs might not have been employed in the Drug Squad anyway.
           
          So maybe no being recognised as a disability could have it's advantages?
        • jdpainterguy
          Geez! How many people in the UK have Anosmia by the way? I am in NY in the US,and I recall one morning on a weekend doing the dishes, and doing the laundry.
          Message 4 of 24 , Oct 25, 2010
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            Geez! How many people in the UK have Anosmia by the way?

            I am in NY in the US,and I recall one morning on a weekend doing the dishes, and doing the laundry. Cleaning the bathroom and scrubbing the shower and toilet. Music playing on the radio. Nice Breakfast and strong though tasteless Coffee in hand and in the pot. (Farberware electric perk)

            Only to look down later and see all the dog crap on my shoes.

            NO problem! I took the shoes off and put them outside.

            Walked around and with a roll of paper towels and a bucket of cleaner, found every spot.

            I think I did a nice job.

            Who the hell in my life could I have called in then?, and who can I call in even now to be a smell inspector?


            --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "LizRM" <welshbunny30@...> wrote:
            >
            > So why is Anosmia now recognised to be a disability which it quite clearly is?
            > I was a Science Teacher, if anyone had asked if I was able to detect gas leaks then I might not have been employed!!
            > A police officer who couldnt tell if a Driver had been drinking or having taken drugs might not have been employed in the Drug Squad anyway.
            >
            > So maybe no being recognised as a disability could have it's advantages?
            >
          • Kirche Zeile
            I am not sure that it should be considered a disability, just because it keeps us from doing certain jobs.  That sort of thing happens all the time.  For
            Message 5 of 24 , Oct 25, 2010
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              I am not sure that it should be considered a disability, just because it keeps us from doing certain jobs.  That sort of thing happens all the time.  For instance, to be a dancer in most Broadway shows or a Rockette at Radio City, you must be at least 5'7".  But being shorter than that is not considered a disability.  It just means you might have to look for work elsewhere.
               
              And I am not sure I would want to be qualified as disabled just because my nose doesn't work the same as most people's.  There isn't much that I can't do.  I was even a Resident Advisor at my college dorm, and I couldn't tell if my residents were smoking pot on my floor.  When I was hired, I was totally honest about my anosmia, but no one seemed to care.  I also cook all the time and kind of enjoy the fact that I often get a seat on the subway, because I have no problem sitting next to the smelly person.   I kind of think of my anosmia as a sort of super power as opposed to a disability.  After all, I have no problem walking NYC streets on garbage night in August, when most of my friends need to stay indoors.
               
              Best,
              Kirche


              From: jdpainterguy <jdpainterguy@...>
              To: anosmia@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Mon, October 25, 2010 8:54:59 PM
              Subject: [anosmia] Re: disability?

               

              Geez! How many people in the UK have Anosmia by the way?

              I am in NY in the US,and I recall one morning on a weekend doing the dishes, and doing the laundry. Cleaning the bathroom and scrubbing the shower and toilet. Music playing on the radio. Nice Breakfast and strong though tasteless Coffee in hand and in the pot. (Farberware electric perk)

              Only to look down later and see all the dog crap on my shoes.

              NO problem! I took the shoes off and put them outside.

              Walked around and with a roll of paper towels and a bucket of cleaner, found every spot.

              I think I did a nice job.

              Who the hell in my life could I have called in then?, and who can I call in even now to be a smell inspector?

              --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "LizRM" <welshbunny30@...> wrote:
              >
              > So why is Anosmia now recognised to be a disability which it quite clearly is?
              > I was a Science Teacher, if anyone had asked if I was able to detect gas leaks then I might not have been employed!!
              > A police officer who couldnt tell if a Driver had been drinking or having taken drugs might not have been employed in the Drug Squad anyway.
              >
              > So maybe no being recognised as a disability could have it's advantages?
              >


            • exit2eden
              The ADA means the Americans With Disability Act. Yes, anosmia is recognized as a disability under the ADA, as it is a major life activity. Under the ADA, a
              Message 6 of 24 , Oct 26, 2010
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                The ADA means the Americans With Disability Act. Yes, anosmia is recognized as a disability under the ADA, as it is a major life activity. Under the ADA, a disabled employee is entitled to a "reasonable accommodation" in order to perform essential job functions. It would be impossible to "reasonably" provide such an accommodation for someone with anosmia if the job requires the ability to smell.

                Anosmia DOES have an impact on your ability to earn a living if your job requires a sense of smell and you should lose it. For example, firefighters and police officers must be able to smell...if they suddenly lose the ability to smell, they can no longer perform their essential job functions. Same goes for a chef or any other profession that requires a sense of smell.

                Not being able to smell IS disabling, when I have to rely on someone else to do this for me. But does that mean I am entitled to a "reasonable accommodation" in my current job? No, as my essential job functions do not require the ability to smell.

                I am the Equal Employment Opportunity/Americans With Disabilities officer for a Maryland state agency. I am an expert in EEO/ADA issues if anyone ever has a question about their rights and protections under the federal law.

                Susan

                --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "Jan" <janpinf@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hi Becky,
                >
                > I've no idea what an ADA is.
                > But anosmia isn't generally recognised as a disability anywhere since it has no impact at all on your ability to earn a living and support yourself.
                >
                > It's distressing, but it's not disabling.
                >
                > Sorry,
                > Jan
                >
                >
                > --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, Becky Fairchild <beckyfairchild95@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Does anyone know if Anosmia is recognized as a disibility by the ADA?
                > >
                >
              • exit2eden
                I neglected to add that if the ability to smell (or the ability to see or hear or speak, for example) is NOT a major requirement to performing essential job
                Message 7 of 24 , Oct 26, 2010
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                  I neglected to add that if the ability to smell (or the ability to see or hear or speak, for example) is NOT a major requirement to performing essential job functions, then it could be "reasonably accommodated".

                  --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "exit2eden" <exit2eden@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > The ADA means the Americans With Disability Act. Yes, anosmia is recognized as a disability under the ADA, as it is a major life activity. Under the ADA, a disabled employee is entitled to a "reasonable accommodation" in order to perform essential job functions. It would be impossible to "reasonably" provide such an accommodation for someone with anosmia if the job requires the ability to smell.
                  >
                  > Anosmia DOES have an impact on your ability to earn a living if your job requires a sense of smell and you should lose it. For example, firefighters and police officers must be able to smell...if they suddenly lose the ability to smell, they can no longer perform their essential job functions. Same goes for a chef or any other profession that requires a sense of smell.
                  >
                  > Not being able to smell IS disabling, when I have to rely on someone else to do this for me. But does that mean I am entitled to a "reasonable accommodation" in my current job? No, as my essential job functions do not require the ability to smell.
                  >
                  > I am the Equal Employment Opportunity/Americans With Disabilities officer for a Maryland state agency. I am an expert in EEO/ADA issues if anyone ever has a question about their rights and protections under the federal law.
                  >
                  > Susan
                  >
                  > --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "Jan" <janpinf@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Hi Becky,
                  > >
                  > > I've no idea what an ADA is.
                  > > But anosmia isn't generally recognised as a disability anywhere since it has no impact at all on your ability to earn a living and support yourself.
                  > >
                  > > It's distressing, but it's not disabling.
                  > >
                  > > Sorry,
                  > > Jan
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, Becky Fairchild <beckyfairchild95@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > Does anyone know if Anosmia is recognized as a disibility by the ADA?
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
                • Kirche Zeile
                  So I assume that once you have found a different kind of job, you no longer get any outside compensation, right?  I have a real problem with people using
                  Message 8 of 24 , Oct 26, 2010
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                    So I assume that once you have found a different kind of job, you no longer get any outside compensation, right?  I have a real problem with people using their anosmia as an excuse not to work.  I have anosmia, and I can do MOST jobs while having it.  Is it devestating for someone to lose a sense of smell?  Well, yes, for most part, absolutely.  But it doesn't mean that you can't work at SOMETHING.
                     
                    I work as a painter.  And it would be devestating to lose the use of my hands...but I hope that I would find something else to do for a living and would only ask for government help until I found another job.
                     
                    -K


                    From: exit2eden <exit2eden@...>
                    To: anosmia@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Tue, October 26, 2010 9:52:05 AM
                    Subject: [anosmia] Re: disability?

                     

                    I neglected to add that if the ability to smell (or the ability to see or hear or speak, for example) is NOT a major requirement to performing essential job functions, then it could be "reasonably accommodated".

                    --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "exit2eden" <exit2eden@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > The ADA means the Americans With Disability Act. Yes, anosmia is recognized as a disability under the ADA, as it is a major life activity. Under the ADA, a disabled employee is entitled to a "reasonable accommodation" in order to perform essential job functions. It would be impossible to "reasonably" provide such an accommodation for someone with anosmia if the job requires the ability to smell.
                    >
                    > Anosmia DOES have an impact on your ability to earn a living if your job requires a sense of smell and you should lose it. For example, firefighters and police officers must be able to smell...if they suddenly lose the ability to smell, they can no longer perform their essential job functions. Same goes for a chef or any other profession that requires a sense of smell.
                    >
                    > Not being able to smell IS disabling, when I have to rely on someone else to do this for me. But does that mean I am entitled to a "reasonable accommodation" in my current job? No, as my essential job functions do not require the ability to smell.
                    >
                    > I am the Equal Employment Opportunity/Americans With Disabilities officer for a Maryland state agency. I am an expert in EEO/ADA issues if anyone ever has a question about their rights and protections under the federal law.
                    >
                    > Susan
                    >
                    > --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "Jan" <janpinf@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Hi Becky,
                    > >
                    > > I've no idea what an ADA is.
                    > > But anosmia isn't generally recognised as a disability anywhere since it has no impact at all on your ability to earn a living and support yourself.
                    > >
                    > > It's distressing, but it's not disabling.
                    > >
                    > > Sorry,
                    > > Jan
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, Becky Fairchild <beckyfairchild95@> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > Does anyone know if Anosmia is recognized as a disibility by the ADA?
                    > > >
                    > >
                    >


                  • lw_
                    Just curious....as far as the ADA is concerned, is there any chance a person could use a dog similar to a seeing eye dog as an accomodation for loss of smell.
                    Message 9 of 24 , Oct 26, 2010
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                      Just curious....as far as the ADA is concerned, is there any chance a person could use a dog similar to a seeing eye dog as an accomodation for loss of smell. If a dog was trained to smell and alert on burning smells, natural gas, strong chemicals, etc...

                      Thanks,

                      Lori

                      --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "exit2eden" <exit2eden@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > The ADA means the Americans With Disability Act. Yes, anosmia is recognized as a disability under the ADA, as it is a major life activity. Under the ADA, a disabled employee is entitled to a "reasonable accommodation" in order to perform essential job functions. It would be impossible to "reasonably" provide such an accommodation for someone with anosmia if the job requires the ability to smell.
                      >
                      > Anosmia DOES have an impact on your ability to earn a living if your job requires a sense of smell and you should lose it. For example, firefighters and police officers must be able to smell...if they suddenly lose the ability to smell, they can no longer perform their essential job functions. Same goes for a chef or any other profession that requires a sense of smell.
                      >
                      > Not being able to smell IS disabling, when I have to rely on someone else to do this for me. But does that mean I am entitled to a "reasonable accommodation" in my current job? No, as my essential job functions do not require the ability to smell.
                      >
                      > I am the Equal Employment Opportunity/Americans With Disabilities officer for a Maryland state agency. I am an expert in EEO/ADA issues if anyone ever has a question about their rights and protections under the federal law.
                      >
                      > Susan
                      >
                      > --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "Jan" <janpinf@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Hi Becky,
                      > >
                      > > I've no idea what an ADA is.
                      > > But anosmia isn't generally recognised as a disability anywhere since it has no impact at all on your ability to earn a living and support yourself.
                      > >
                      > > It's distressing, but it's not disabling.
                      > >
                      > > Sorry,
                      > > Jan
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, Becky Fairchild <beckyfairchild95@> wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > Does anyone know if Anosmia is recognized as a disibility by the ADA?
                      > > >
                      > >
                      >
                    • Paul Strawson
                      Hi Susan, Police and firefighters in your country rarely work alone, so unless you ve hit an unlucky jackpot of 2 or more anosmics ending up as a team, surely
                      Message 10 of 24 , Oct 26, 2010
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                        Hi Susan,
                         
                        Police and firefighters in your country rarely work alone, so unless you've hit an unlucky jackpot of 2 or more anosmics ending up as a team, surely you have "reasonable accommodation" built in?
                         
                        Just a thought,
                         
                        Paul, a congenital anosmic from Sydney Australia


                        From: exit2eden <exit2eden@...>
                        To: anosmia@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Wed, 27 October, 2010 12:44:21 AM
                        Subject: [anosmia] Re: disability?

                         

                        The ADA means the Americans With Disability Act. Yes, anosmia is recognized as a disability under the ADA, as it is a major life activity. Under the ADA, a disabled employee is entitled to a "reasonable accommodation" in order to perform essential job functions. It would be impossible to "reasonably" provide such an accommodation for someone with anosmia if the job requires the ability to smell.

                        Anosmia DOES have an impact on your ability to earn a living if your job requires a sense of smell and you should lose it. For example, firefighters and police officers must be able to smell...if they suddenly lose the ability to smell, they can no longer perform their essential job functions. Same goes for a chef or any other profession that requires a sense of smell.

                        Not being able to smell IS disabling, when I have to rely on someone else to do this for me. But does that mean I am entitled to a "reasonable accommodation" in my current job? No, as my essential job functions do not require the ability to smell.

                        I am the Equal Employment Opportunity/Americans With Disabilities officer for a Maryland state agency. I am an expert in EEO/ADA issues if anyone ever has a question about their rights and protections under the federal law.

                        Susan


                         
                      • Jeanne Timpson
                        Susan, Thank you for writing in w/ that information.  I had no idea anosmia was actually legally considered a disability.     Jeanne ... From: exit2eden
                        Message 11 of 24 , Oct 26, 2010
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                          Susan,
                          Thank you for writing in w/ that information.  I had no idea anosmia was actually legally considered a disability.
                           
                           
                          Jeanne

                          --- On Tue, 10/26/10, exit2eden <exit2eden@...> wrote:

                          From: exit2eden <exit2eden@...>
                          Subject: [anosmia] Re: disability?
                          To: anosmia@yahoogroups.com
                          Date: Tuesday, October 26, 2010, 9:44 AM

                           
                          The ADA means the Americans With Disability Act. Yes, anosmia is recognized as a disability under the ADA, as it is a major life activity. Under the ADA, a disabled employee is entitled to a "reasonable accommodation" in order to perform essential job functions. It would be impossible to "reasonably" provide such an accommodation for someone with anosmia if the job requires the ability to smell.

                          Anosmia DOES have an impact on your ability to earn a living if your job requires a sense of smell and you should lose it. For example, firefighters and police officers must be able to smell...if they suddenly lose the ability to smell, they can no longer perform their essential job functions. Same goes for a chef or any other profession that requires a sense of smell.

                          Not being able to smell IS disabling, when I have to rely on someone else to do this for me. But does that mean I am entitled to a "reasonable accommodation" in my current job? No, as my essential job functions do not require the ability to smell.

                          I am the Equal Employment Opportunity/Americans With Disabilities officer for a Maryland state agency. I am an expert in EEO/ADA issues if anyone ever has a question about their rights and protections under the federal law.

                          Susan

                          --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "Jan" <janpinf@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Hi Becky,
                          >
                          > I've no idea what an ADA is.
                          > But anosmia isn't generally recognised as a disability anywhere since it has no impact at all on your ability to earn a living and support yourself.
                          >
                          > It's distressing, but it's not disabling.
                          >
                          > Sorry,
                          > Jan
                          >
                          >
                          > --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, Becky Fairchild <beckyfairchild95@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > Does anyone know if Anosmia is recognized as a disibility by the ADA?
                          > >
                          >


                        • goatea
                          Ah yes, a debate on whether we are entitled to govt. services, whether anosmia is a real problem or not. Now we re getting somewhere. I speak half jokingly,
                          Message 12 of 24 , Oct 27, 2010
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                            Ah yes, a debate on whether we are entitled to govt. services, whether anosmia is a real 'problem' or not. Now we're getting somewhere. I speak half jokingly, but isn't that how things get done? (here in America at least) Watch now, how someone sues a company for not giving anosmia compensation, everyone decries this frivolous action, but then a debate begins and doctors actually start doing something to change it. I really believe that not being able to smell is a reversible problem, but as long as it's classified as 'no big deal' then nothing is going to be done to change it, and we'll all go on complaining about it on boards such as these.


                            --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "exit2eden" <exit2eden@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > The ADA means the Americans With Disability Act. Yes, anosmia is recognized as a disability under the ADA, as it is a major life activity. Under the ADA, a disabled employee is entitled to a "reasonable accommodation" in order to perform essential job functions. It would be impossible to "reasonably" provide such an accommodation for someone with anosmia if the job requires the ability to smell.
                            >
                            > Anosmia DOES have an impact on your ability to earn a living if your job requires a sense of smell and you should lose it. For example, firefighters and police officers must be able to smell...if they suddenly lose the ability to smell, they can no longer perform their essential job functions. Same goes for a chef or any other profession that requires a sense of smell.
                            >
                            > Not being able to smell IS disabling, when I have to rely on someone else to do this for me. But does that mean I am entitled to a "reasonable accommodation" in my current job? No, as my essential job functions do not require the ability to smell.
                            >
                            > I am the Equal Employment Opportunity/Americans With Disabilities officer for a Maryland state agency. I am an expert in EEO/ADA issues if anyone ever has a question about their rights and protections under the federal law.
                            >
                            > Susan
                            >
                            > --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "Jan" <janpinf@> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > Hi Becky,
                            > >
                            > > I've no idea what an ADA is.
                            > > But anosmia isn't generally recognised as a disability anywhere since it has no impact at all on your ability to earn a living and support yourself.
                            > >
                            > > It's distressing, but it's not disabling.
                            > >
                            > > Sorry,
                            > > Jan
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, Becky Fairchild <beckyfairchild95@> wrote:
                            > > >
                            > > > Does anyone know if Anosmia is recognized as a disibility by the ADA?
                            > > >
                            > >
                            >
                          • exit2eden
                            Well, that may work, but what if the dog calls in sick? ;-) Seriously, though, I m not personally familiar with anyone using a service animal for this purpose,
                            Message 13 of 24 , Oct 27, 2010
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                              Well, that may work, but what if the dog calls in sick? ;-)

                              Seriously, though, I'm not personally familiar with anyone using a service animal for this purpose, but that doesn't mean it couldn't be considered!

                              --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "lw_" <lampajam@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Just curious....as far as the ADA is concerned, is there any chance a person could use a dog similar to a seeing eye dog as an accomodation for loss of smell. If a dog was trained to smell and alert on burning smells, natural gas, strong chemicals, etc...
                              >
                              > Thanks,
                              >
                              > Lori
                              >
                              > --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "exit2eden" <exit2eden@> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > The ADA means the Americans With Disability Act. Yes, anosmia is recognized as a disability under the ADA, as it is a major life activity. Under the ADA, a disabled employee is entitled to a "reasonable accommodation" in order to perform essential job functions. It would be impossible to "reasonably" provide such an accommodation for someone with anosmia if the job requires the ability to smell.
                              > >
                              > > Anosmia DOES have an impact on your ability to earn a living if your job requires a sense of smell and you should lose it. For example, firefighters and police officers must be able to smell...if they suddenly lose the ability to smell, they can no longer perform their essential job functions. Same goes for a chef or any other profession that requires a sense of smell.
                              > >
                              > > Not being able to smell IS disabling, when I have to rely on someone else to do this for me. But does that mean I am entitled to a "reasonable accommodation" in my current job? No, as my essential job functions do not require the ability to smell.
                              > >
                              > > I am the Equal Employment Opportunity/Americans With Disabilities officer for a Maryland state agency. I am an expert in EEO/ADA issues if anyone ever has a question about their rights and protections under the federal law.
                              > >
                              > > Susan
                              > >
                              > > --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "Jan" <janpinf@> wrote:
                              > > >
                              > > > Hi Becky,
                              > > >
                              > > > I've no idea what an ADA is.
                              > > > But anosmia isn't generally recognised as a disability anywhere since it has no impact at all on your ability to earn a living and support yourself.
                              > > >
                              > > > It's distressing, but it's not disabling.
                              > > >
                              > > > Sorry,
                              > > > Jan
                              > > >
                              > > >
                              > > > --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, Becky Fairchild <beckyfairchild95@> wrote:
                              > > > >
                              > > > > Does anyone know if Anosmia is recognized as a disibility by the ADA?
                              > > > >
                              > > >
                              > >
                              >
                            • exit2eden
                              Not being able to smell is a reversible problem??? Well, if that s the case, then it s not a disability, as defined by the ADA! If the ability to smell is an
                              Message 14 of 24 , Oct 27, 2010
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                                Not being able to smell is a "reversible" problem??? Well, if that's the case, then it's not a disability, as defined by the ADA!

                                If the ability to smell is an essential job function and it cannot be "reasonably accommodated", then that's it...end of story. That goes for ANY disability.

                                This link to the EEOC provides a good overview of the ADA and what is covered under the law: http://www.eeoc.gov/laws/types/disability.cfm


                                --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "goatea" <goatea@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Ah yes, a debate on whether we are entitled to govt. services, whether anosmia is a real 'problem' or not. Now we're getting somewhere. I speak half jokingly, but isn't that how things get done? (here in America at least) Watch now, how someone sues a company for not giving anosmia compensation, everyone decries this frivolous action, but then a debate begins and doctors actually start doing something to change it. I really believe that not being able to smell is a reversible problem, but as long as it's classified as 'no big deal' then nothing is going to be done to change it, and we'll all go on complaining about it on boards such as these.
                                >
                                >
                                > --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "exit2eden" <exit2eden@> wrote:
                                > >
                                > > The ADA means the Americans With Disability Act. Yes, anosmia is recognized as a disability under the ADA, as it is a major life activity. Under the ADA, a disabled employee is entitled to a "reasonable accommodation" in order to perform essential job functions. It would be impossible to "reasonably" provide such an accommodation for someone with anosmia if the job requires the ability to smell.
                                > >
                                > > Anosmia DOES have an impact on your ability to earn a living if your job requires a sense of smell and you should lose it. For example, firefighters and police officers must be able to smell...if they suddenly lose the ability to smell, they can no longer perform their essential job functions. Same goes for a chef or any other profession that requires a sense of smell.
                                > >
                                > > Not being able to smell IS disabling, when I have to rely on someone else to do this for me. But does that mean I am entitled to a "reasonable accommodation" in my current job? No, as my essential job functions do not require the ability to smell.
                                > >
                                > > I am the Equal Employment Opportunity/Americans With Disabilities officer for a Maryland state agency. I am an expert in EEO/ADA issues if anyone ever has a question about their rights and protections under the federal law.
                                > >
                                > > Susan
                                > >
                                > > --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "Jan" <janpinf@> wrote:
                                > > >
                                > > > Hi Becky,
                                > > >
                                > > > I've no idea what an ADA is.
                                > > > But anosmia isn't generally recognised as a disability anywhere since it has no impact at all on your ability to earn a living and support yourself.
                                > > >
                                > > > It's distressing, but it's not disabling.
                                > > >
                                > > > Sorry,
                                > > > Jan
                                > > >
                                > > >
                                > > > --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, Becky Fairchild <beckyfairchild95@> wrote:
                                > > > >
                                > > > > Does anyone know if Anosmia is recognized as a disibility by the ADA?
                                > > > >
                                > > >
                                > >
                                >
                              • Jan
                                So if an ability to smell something is an requirement of the job, is it routinely tested as part of the job interview process? I know people with congenital
                                Message 15 of 24 , Oct 27, 2010
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                                  So if an ability to smell something is an requirement of the job, is it routinely tested as part of the job interview process?

                                  I know people with congenital anosmia (in the Kallmann groups) in many different types of work where normosmics assume a sense of smell would be essential but it was never asked about and actually hasn't caused any difficulties. Biomedical labs, civil engineering labs, pharmaceuticals, nursing, military, police, farming, veterinarians, cooking, childcare, etc. etc.

                                  I wouldn't mind betting a large piece of date and walnut cake (yummy!:-) that osmic ability is seldom tested for most jobs - not even the police or fire service that people have given as examples in other posts.

                                  And if is NOT tested before taking up a job, how does someone prove that they lost their sense of smell AFTER taking up the job?

                                  Funny. But by that definition of disability and reversibility, then the congenital anosmics for whom anosmia is definitely not reversible should feel the most disabled. But we are the ones who generally feel the least disabled! :-)

                                  The difficulty with anosmia is that very few people will be able to prove beyond shadow of doubt that the anosmia is not reversible. Viral anosmics are probably the most likely to regain their sense of smell. Polyps, it comes and goes. Head bangers are highly unikely to regain their sense of smell, but it can happen even after many years.

                                  Those of us born with no olfactory bulbs, who never had and never will have a sense of smell are probably the best adjusted to life with NO aromas and generally do have a good sense of taste too. And we probably wouldn't be doing jobs where a sense of smell really was a contractual part of the job anyway. But according to what is written below - we can definitely claim disability.

                                  And where does that leave poor hypothetical Ada who had a bad cold and hasn't had a sense of smell for over a year, works in a kitchen and feels devasted by her anosmia (which may or may not be permanent, but nobody can say for definite either way).

                                  Sounds like a Catch-22 to me :-DDDDDDDDD

                                  Jan


                                  --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "exit2eden" <exit2eden@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Not being able to smell is a "reversible" problem??? Well, if that's the case, then it's not a disability, as defined by the ADA!
                                  >
                                  > If the ability to smell is an essential job function and it cannot be "reasonably accommodated", then that's it...end of story. That goes for ANY disability.
                                  >
                                  > This link to the EEOC provides a good overview of the ADA and what is covered under the law: http://www.eeoc.gov/laws/types/disability.cfm
                                  >
                                • LizRM
                                  As I have said before I am a qualified Science Teacher. As a congenital Anosmic my College lecturer was able to add a note to my exam paper that due to having
                                  Message 16 of 24 , Oct 27, 2010
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                                    As I have said before I am a qualified Science Teacher. As a congenital Anosmic my College lecturer  was able to add a note to my exam paper that due to having no sense of smell I was unable to answer some questions with tests for chemicals for example ....needing to go through 6 small tests to be sure that a chemical was Ammonia for example. In practice in the Lab I would just ask someone nearby if this was what I suspected it to be. Ofcourse under exam conditions I was not allowed to speak to anyone during that time. However when I passed my necessary exams and qualified there was no enquiry as to my smelling ability and I was able to get any question of a smell answered by one of the Lab Technician.
                                     
                                    However if in the  USA anosmia is recognised as a disability,  it certainly is not in the UK.  From my example this can be seen as as much an advantage as a disadvantage. There certainly seems to be no interest in researching  any means of correcting this problem in those of us who have no idea what a smell is be it good or bad.
                                  • knw@pacbell.net
                                    I just got off the phone with the U.S. Dept of Justice, they oversee the ADA. According to the woman I spoke with we fall into a gray area . The only part
                                    Message 17 of 24 , Oct 27, 2010
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                                      I just got off the phone with the U.S. Dept of Justice, they oversee the ADA. According to the woman I spoke with we fall into a "gray area". The only part of the law that MIGHT apply to those who have lost their sense of smell, not those born without, is under Title 3, Sec. 36.104:
                                      Disability means, with respect to an individual, a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more of the major life activities of such individual; a record of such an impairment; or being regarded as having such animpairment.

                                      (1) The phrase physical or mental impairment means --

                                      (i) Any physiological disorder or condition, cosmetic disfigurement, or anatomical loss affecting one or more of the following body systems: neurological; musculoskeletal; special sense organs; respiratory, including speech organs; cardiovascular; reproductive; digestive; genitourinary; hemic and lymphatic; skin; and endocrine;

                                      (ii) Any mental or psychological disorder such as mental retardation, organic brain syndrome, emotional or mental illness, and specific learning disabilities;

                                      (iii) The phrase physical or mental impairment includes, but is not limited to, such contagious and noncontagious diseases and conditions as orthopedic, visual, speech, and hearing impairments, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, muscular dystrophy, multiple sclerosis, cancer, heart disease, diabetes, mental retardation, emotional illness, specific learning disabilities, HIV disease (whether symptomatic or asymptomatic), tuberculosis, drug addiction, and alcoholism;

                                      (iv) The phrase physical or mental impairment does not include homosexuality or bisexuality.

                                      (2) The phrase major life activities means functions such as caring for one's self, performing manual tasks, walking, seeing, hearing, speaking, breathing, learning, and working.

                                      (3) The phrase has a record of such an impairment means has a history of, or has been misclassified as having, a mental or physical impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities.

                                      If anyone is interested a full text of Title 3 can be found at:
                                      http://www.ada.gov/reg3a.html#Anchor-36104

                                      Kelly

                                      --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, Becky Fairchild <beckyfairchild95@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > Does anyone know if Anosmia is recognized as a disibility by the ADA?
                                      >
                                    • vagabondrose
                                      I am of the head banger variety. 8 months in recovery and I okay, I think. The problem is I lack almost all motivation. This is very weird for me. I
                                      Message 18 of 24 , Oct 29, 2010
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                                        I am of the "head banger" variety. 8 months in recovery and I okay, I think. The problem is I lack almost all motivation. This is very weird for me.
                                        I always had a plan, always doing things, hiking, knitting, reading, learning new languages, I love/ed cooking:-(
                                        I am now realizing how important the sense of smell is. Not only does it help with eating or keep us safe from dangerous fumes, it plays a large, maybe very large role, in creating ones environment. I remember walking in the woods thinking deeply, and enjoying the smell of nature. I loved flowers.
                                        Now I am passive when it comes to taking care of my animals, my own hygiene, brushing teeth, and cleaning in general. Not to mention that I have eaten spoiled food and didn't care. I find I touch things that before grossed me out. Also I am rarely motivated to leave my apartment.
                                        In some way anosmia has been great- I would sit next to anyone on the bus, I don't judge people or things they way I did before. But I believe in some way anosmia has "disabled" my ability get motivated and make decisions.
                                        I trust that over time I will adjust. But how much time? The crappy thing is that there is little to no research, and TBI rehab has not addressed Anosmia at all.
                                        This could be a potential "short term" disability for those of us non-congenital types. But there are other considerations - previously in life I was in a security position where being able to catch the smell of flammable and hazardous material was very important. I wonder how I would handle things now if I was still employed there?

                                        --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "Jan" <janpinf@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > So if an ability to smell something is an requirement of the job, is it routinely tested as part of the job interview process?
                                        >
                                        > I know people with congenital anosmia (in the Kallmann groups) in many different types of work where normosmics assume a sense of smell would be essential but it was never asked about and actually hasn't caused any difficulties. Biomedical labs, civil engineering labs, pharmaceuticals, nursing, military, police, farming, veterinarians, cooking, childcare, etc. etc.
                                        >
                                        > I wouldn't mind betting a large piece of date and walnut cake (yummy!:-) that osmic ability is seldom tested for most jobs - not even the police or fire service that people have given as examples in other posts.
                                        >
                                        > And if is NOT tested before taking up a job, how does someone prove that they lost their sense of smell AFTER taking up the job?
                                        >
                                        > Funny. But by that definition of disability and reversibility, then the congenital anosmics for whom anosmia is definitely not reversible should feel the most disabled. But we are the ones who generally feel the least disabled! :-)
                                        >
                                        > The difficulty with anosmia is that very few people will be able to prove beyond shadow of doubt that the anosmia is not reversible. Viral anosmics are probably the most likely to regain their sense of smell. Polyps, it comes and goes. Head bangers are highly unikely to regain their sense of smell, but it can happen even after many years.
                                        >
                                        > Those of us born with no olfactory bulbs, who never had and never will have a sense of smell are probably the best adjusted to life with NO aromas and generally do have a good sense of taste too. And we probably wouldn't be doing jobs where a sense of smell really was a contractual part of the job anyway. But according to what is written below - we can definitely claim disability.
                                        >
                                        > And where does that leave poor hypothetical Ada who had a bad cold and hasn't had a sense of smell for over a year, works in a kitchen and feels devasted by her anosmia (which may or may not be permanent, but nobody can say for definite either way).
                                        >
                                        > Sounds like a Catch-22 to me :-DDDDDDDDD
                                        >
                                        > Jan
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "exit2eden" <exit2eden@> wrote:
                                        > >
                                        > > Not being able to smell is a "reversible" problem??? Well, if that's the case, then it's not a disability, as defined by the ADA!
                                        > >
                                        > > If the ability to smell is an essential job function and it cannot be "reasonably accommodated", then that's it...end of story. That goes for ANY disability.
                                        > >
                                        > > This link to the EEOC provides a good overview of the ADA and what is covered under the law: http://www.eeoc.gov/laws/types/disability.cfm
                                        > >
                                        >
                                      • vagabondrose
                                        Not to mention that when my cat s, or anyone else s cat or dog licks my face- I don t mind, and don t rush to wash off. Should I talk to a human doctor, or a
                                        Message 19 of 24 , Oct 29, 2010
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                                          Not to mention that when my cat's, or anyone else's cat or dog licks my face- I don't mind, and don't rush to wash off. Should I talk to a human doctor, or a vet about this?
                                          PS. Please note I don't blame anosmia for my poor spelling ;-)


                                          --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "vagabondrose" <vagabondrose@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > I am of the "head banger" variety. 8 months in recovery and I okay, I think. The problem is I lack almost all motivation. This is very weird for me.
                                          > I always had a plan, always doing things, hiking, knitting, reading, learning new languages, I love/ed cooking:-(
                                          > I am now realizing how important the sense of smell is. Not only does it help with eating or keep us safe from dangerous fumes, it plays a large, maybe very large role, in creating ones environment. I remember walking in the woods thinking deeply, and enjoying the smell of nature. I loved flowers.
                                          > Now I am passive when it comes to taking care of my animals, my own hygiene, brushing teeth, and cleaning in general. Not to mention that I have eaten spoiled food and didn't care. I find I touch things that before grossed me out. Also I am rarely motivated to leave my apartment.
                                          > In some way anosmia has been great- I would sit next to anyone on the bus, I don't judge people or things they way I did before. But I believe in some way anosmia has "disabled" my ability get motivated and make decisions.
                                          > I trust that over time I will adjust. But how much time? The crappy thing is that there is little to no research, and TBI rehab has not addressed Anosmia at all.
                                          > This could be a potential "short term" disability for those of us non-congenital types. But there are other considerations - previously in life I was in a security position where being able to catch the smell of flammable and hazardous material was very important. I wonder how I would handle things now if I was still employed there?
                                          >
                                          > --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "Jan" <janpinf@> wrote:
                                          > >
                                          > > So if an ability to smell something is an requirement of the job, is it routinely tested as part of the job interview process?
                                          > >
                                          > > I know people with congenital anosmia (in the Kallmann groups) in many different types of work where normosmics assume a sense of smell would be essential but it was never asked about and actually hasn't caused any difficulties. Biomedical labs, civil engineering labs, pharmaceuticals, nursing, military, police, farming, veterinarians, cooking, childcare, etc. etc.
                                          > >
                                          > > I wouldn't mind betting a large piece of date and walnut cake (yummy!:-) that osmic ability is seldom tested for most jobs - not even the police or fire service that people have given as examples in other posts.
                                          > >
                                          > > And if is NOT tested before taking up a job, how does someone prove that they lost their sense of smell AFTER taking up the job?
                                          > >
                                          > > Funny. But by that definition of disability and reversibility, then the congenital anosmics for whom anosmia is definitely not reversible should feel the most disabled. But we are the ones who generally feel the least disabled! :-)
                                          > >
                                          > > The difficulty with anosmia is that very few people will be able to prove beyond shadow of doubt that the anosmia is not reversible. Viral anosmics are probably the most likely to regain their sense of smell. Polyps, it comes and goes. Head bangers are highly unikely to regain their sense of smell, but it can happen even after many years.
                                          > >
                                          > > Those of us born with no olfactory bulbs, who never had and never will have a sense of smell are probably the best adjusted to life with NO aromas and generally do have a good sense of taste too. And we probably wouldn't be doing jobs where a sense of smell really was a contractual part of the job anyway. But according to what is written below - we can definitely claim disability.
                                          > >
                                          > > And where does that leave poor hypothetical Ada who had a bad cold and hasn't had a sense of smell for over a year, works in a kitchen and feels devasted by her anosmia (which may or may not be permanent, but nobody can say for definite either way).
                                          > >
                                          > > Sounds like a Catch-22 to me :-DDDDDDDDD
                                          > >
                                          > > Jan
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          > > --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "exit2eden" <exit2eden@> wrote:
                                          > > >
                                          > > > Not being able to smell is a "reversible" problem??? Well, if that's the case, then it's not a disability, as defined by the ADA!
                                          > > >
                                          > > > If the ability to smell is an essential job function and it cannot be "reasonably accommodated", then that's it...end of story. That goes for ANY disability.
                                          > > >
                                          > > > This link to the EEOC provides a good overview of the ADA and what is covered under the law: http://www.eeoc.gov/laws/types/disability.cfm
                                          > > >
                                          > >
                                          >
                                        • Greg O'Loughlin
                                          Hang in there as 8 months post trauma is a pretty short time really. I went through a few fazes of eating, cleaning, basic hygiene roller coasters... trick is
                                          Message 20 of 24 , Oct 30, 2010
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                                            Hang in there as 8 months post trauma is a pretty short time really.
                                            I went through a few fazes of eating, cleaning, basic hygiene roller coasters... trick is to not get stuck into a situation that will hang you up as it sounds like it can.

                                            Since you already are aware that you are not doing a great job at brushing or getting out... just force yourself to go against what seems easy at the moment.
                                            After I went through this stage I actually started brushing my teeth too much to where the gums are receding... over compensation really.
                                            Maybe work towards getting yourself into that boat and then somewhere after that you can find a happy medium.

                                            Keep yourself healthy physically and mentally... you have to overdo it a bit here to make up for our loss of smell.

                                            If you find that it is getting worse ( as you seem to be able to diagnose this awareness on your own) and you are not getting out at all... seek help with someone, a friend, a psych... who can help you through this tough spot.
                                            This is a far more serious loss than most folk want to accept, so don't let the loss of your smell drag the rest of you down... gotta keep with it!

                                            Keep in touch with us here for reality checks as well.   Eating rotten food is about as good for you as holing yourself up.  Depression is serious, seek help when you know that you need it.

                                            Hang in there!

                                            Greg

                                            On Oct 29, 2010, at 6:36 PM, vagabondrose wrote:

                                             

                                            Not to mention that when my cat's, or anyone else's cat or dog licks my face- I don't mind, and don't rush to wash off. Should I talk to a human doctor, or a vet about this?
                                            PS. Please note I don't blame anosmia for my poor spelling ;-)

                                            --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "vagabondrose" <vagabondrose@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            > I am of the "head banger" variety. 8 months in recovery and I okay, I think. The problem is I lack almost all motivation. This is very weird for me.
                                            > I always had a plan, always doing things, hiking, knitting, reading, learning new languages, I love/ed cooking:-(
                                            > I am now realizing how important the sense of smell is. Not only does it help with eating or keep us safe from dangerous fumes, it plays a large, maybe very large role, in creating ones environment. I remember walking in the woods thinking deeply, and enjoying the smell of nature. I loved flowers.
                                            > Now I am passive when it comes to taking care of my animals, my own hygiene, brushing teeth, and cleaning in general. Not to mention that I have eaten spoiled food and didn't care. I find I touch things that before grossed me out. Also I am rarely motivated to leave my apartment.
                                            > In some way anosmia has been great- I would sit next to anyone on the bus, I don't judge people or things they way I did before. But I believe in some way anosmia has "disabled" my ability get motivated and make decisions.
                                            > I trust that over time I will adjust. But how much time? The crappy thing is that there is little to no research, and TBI rehab has not addressed Anosmia at all.
                                            > This could be a potential "short term" disability for those of us non-congenital types. But there are other considerations - previously in life I was in a security position where being able to catch the smell of flammable and hazardous material was very important. I wonder how I would handle things now if I was still employed there?
                                            >
                                            > --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "Jan" <janpinf@> wrote:
                                            > >
                                            > > So if an ability to smell something is an requirement of the job, is it routinely tested as part of the job interview process?
                                            > >
                                            > > I know people with congenital anosmia (in the Kallmann groups) in many different types of work where normosmics assume a sense of smell would be essential but it was never asked about and actually hasn't caused any difficulties. Biomedical labs, civil engineering labs, pharmaceuticals, nursing, military, police, farming, veterinarians, cooking, childcare, etc. etc.
                                            > >
                                            > > I wouldn't mind betting a large piece of date and walnut cake (yummy!:-) that osmic ability is seldom tested for most jobs - not even the police or fire service that people have given as examples in other posts.
                                            > >
                                            > > And if is NOT tested before taking up a job, how does someone prove that they lost their sense of smell AFTER taking up the job?
                                            > >
                                            > > Funny. But by that definition of disability and reversibility, then the congenital anosmics for whom anosmia is definitely not reversible should feel the most disabled. But we are the ones who generally feel the least disabled! :-)
                                            > >
                                            > > The difficulty with anosmia is that very few people will be able to prove beyond shadow of doubt that the anosmia is not reversible. Viral anosmics are probably the most likely to regain their sense of smell. Polyps, it comes and goes. Head bangers are highly unikely to regain their sense of smell, but it can happen even after many years.
                                            > >
                                            > > Those of us born with no olfactory bulbs, who never had and never will have a sense of smell are probably the best adjusted to life with NO aromas and generally do have a good sense of taste too. And we probably wouldn't be doing jobs where a sense of smell really was a contractual part of the job anyway. But according to what is written below - we can definitely claim disability.
                                            > >
                                            > > And where does that leave poor hypothetical Ada who had a bad cold and hasn't had a sense of smell for over a year, works in a kitchen and feels devasted by her anosmia (which may or may not be permanent, but nobody can say for definite either way).
                                            > >
                                            > > Sounds like a Catch-22 to me :-DDDDDDDDD
                                            > >
                                            > > Jan
                                            > >
                                            > >
                                            > > --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "exit2eden" <exit2eden@> wrote:
                                            > > >
                                            > > > Not being able to smell is a "reversible" problem??? Well, if that's the case, then it's not a disability, as defined by the ADA!
                                            > > >
                                            > > > If the ability to smell is an essential job function and it cannot be "reasonably accommodated", then that's it...end of story. That goes for ANY disability.
                                            > > >
                                            > > > This link to the EEOC provides a good overview of the ADA and what is covered under the law: http://www.eeoc.gov/laws/types/disability.cfm
                                            > > >
                                            > >
                                            >


                                          • lw_
                                            Hi! I m also a headbanger and many of the things you are describing were not just related to smell loss but also from the head trauma. It was 2 full years
                                            Message 21 of 24 , Oct 30, 2010
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                                              Hi!

                                              I'm also a headbanger and many of the things you are describing were not just related to smell loss but also from the head trauma. It was 2 full years before I felt I was like myself again. Only after 1 year was I able to plan a task and see it through. Also, definitely became a single tasker rather than a multitasker. I hope in time some of this resolves for you. I can say it took about 4 1/2 years before I didn't reference my head injury for something I couldn't do or do well.

                                              Best regards,

                                              Lori
                                              Headbanger since 2004

                                              --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "vagabondrose" <vagabondrose@...> wrote:
                                              >
                                              > I am of the "head banger" variety. 8 months in recovery and I okay, I think. The problem is I lack almost all motivation. This is very weird for me.
                                              > I always had a plan, always doing things, hiking, knitting, reading, learning new languages, I love/ed cooking:-(
                                              > I am now realizing how important the sense of smell is. Not only does it help with eating or keep us safe from dangerous fumes, it plays a large, maybe very large role, in creating ones environment. I remember walking in the woods thinking deeply, and enjoying the smell of nature. I loved flowers.
                                              > Now I am passive when it comes to taking care of my animals, my own hygiene, brushing teeth, and cleaning in general. Not to mention that I have eaten spoiled food and didn't care. I find I touch things that before grossed me out. Also I am rarely motivated to leave my apartment.
                                              > In some way anosmia has been great- I would sit next to anyone on the bus, I don't judge people or things they way I did before. But I believe in some way anosmia has "disabled" my ability get motivated and make decisions.
                                              > I trust that over time I will adjust. But how much time? The crappy thing is that there is little to no research, and TBI rehab has not addressed Anosmia at all.
                                              > This could be a potential "short term" disability for those of us non-congenital types. But there are other considerations - previously in life I was in a security position where being able to catch the smell of flammable and hazardous material was very important. I wonder how I would handle things now if I was still employed there?
                                              >
                                              > --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "Jan" <janpinf@> wrote:
                                              > >
                                              > > So if an ability to smell something is an requirement of the job, is it routinely tested as part of the job interview process?
                                              > >
                                              > > I know people with congenital anosmia (in the Kallmann groups) in many different types of work where normosmics assume a sense of smell would be essential but it was never asked about and actually hasn't caused any difficulties. Biomedical labs, civil engineering labs, pharmaceuticals, nursing, military, police, farming, veterinarians, cooking, childcare, etc. etc.
                                              > >
                                              > > I wouldn't mind betting a large piece of date and walnut cake (yummy!:-) that osmic ability is seldom tested for most jobs - not even the police or fire service that people have given as examples in other posts.
                                              > >
                                              > > And if is NOT tested before taking up a job, how does someone prove that they lost their sense of smell AFTER taking up the job?
                                              > >
                                              > > Funny. But by that definition of disability and reversibility, then the congenital anosmics for whom anosmia is definitely not reversible should feel the most disabled. But we are the ones who generally feel the least disabled! :-)
                                              > >
                                              > > The difficulty with anosmia is that very few people will be able to prove beyond shadow of doubt that the anosmia is not reversible. Viral anosmics are probably the most likely to regain their sense of smell. Polyps, it comes and goes. Head bangers are highly unikely to regain their sense of smell, but it can happen even after many years.
                                              > >
                                              > > Those of us born with no olfactory bulbs, who never had and never will have a sense of smell are probably the best adjusted to life with NO aromas and generally do have a good sense of taste too. And we probably wouldn't be doing jobs where a sense of smell really was a contractual part of the job anyway. But according to what is written below - we can definitely claim disability.
                                              > >
                                              > > And where does that leave poor hypothetical Ada who had a bad cold and hasn't had a sense of smell for over a year, works in a kitchen and feels devasted by her anosmia (which may or may not be permanent, but nobody can say for definite either way).
                                              > >
                                              > > Sounds like a Catch-22 to me :-DDDDDDDDD
                                              > >
                                              > > Jan
                                              > >
                                              > >
                                              > > --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "exit2eden" <exit2eden@> wrote:
                                              > > >
                                              > > > Not being able to smell is a "reversible" problem??? Well, if that's the case, then it's not a disability, as defined by the ADA!
                                              > > >
                                              > > > If the ability to smell is an essential job function and it cannot be "reasonably accommodated", then that's it...end of story. That goes for ANY disability.
                                              > > >
                                              > > > This link to the EEOC provides a good overview of the ADA and what is covered under the law: http://www.eeoc.gov/laws/types/disability.cfm
                                              > > >
                                              > >
                                              >
                                            • JOANNECORDERO@aol.com
                                              Hi Jan And Lori, I also have head trauma resulting in skull fracture and anosmia. I could not think clearly or mulititask. When I needed surgery on my
                                              Message 22 of 24 , Oct 30, 2010
                                              • 0 Attachment
                                                Hi Jan And Lori,
                                                I also have head trauma resulting in skull fracture and anosmia.  I could not think clearly or mulititask.
                                                When I needed surgery on my shoulder from the accident, I was put on Lamectal. It was used as a                           
                                                precaution in case of  seizure that sometimes occurs after head trauma.
                                                Since I was put on Lamectal my confusion and thoughts improved. I am still taking the medication.
                                                I am grateful it is helping.  My accident was in 2007, I have been taking the medication for 2 years.

                                                Jan I also feel what you feel about missing the smell of life, nature, it's an unconscious everyday
                                                every minute part of who we are.  I find myself staying home, not feeling feminine, feeling insecure                            about myself and how i smell.  I feel the same after sweating as I do after a shower. 
                                                I feel I am a colder person. I don't care if I hug a person. No being able to smell a baby, my son,
                                                my dog hurts. there is a barrier that can't be broken.

                                                It's good to be in touch we people who understand.
                                                Thank you,  Joanne



                                                -----Original Message-----
                                                From: lw_ <lampajam@...>
                                                To: anosmia@yahoogroups.com
                                                Sent: Sat, Oct 30, 2010 7:57 pm
                                                Subject: [anosmia] Re: disability?

                                                 
                                                Hi!

                                                I'm also a headbanger and many of the things you are describing were not just related to smell loss but also from the head trauma. It was 2 full years before I felt I was like myself again. Only after 1 year was I able to plan a task and see it through. Also, definitely became a single tasker rather than a multitasker. I hope in time some of this resolves for you. I can say it took about 4 1/2 years before I didn't reference my head injury for something I couldn't do or do well.

                                                Best regards,

                                                Lori
                                                Headbanger since 2004

                                                --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "vagabondrose" <vagabondrose@...> wrote:
                                                >
                                                > I am of the "head banger" variety. 8 months in recovery and I okay, I think. The problem is I lack almost all motivation. This is very weird for me.
                                                > I always had a plan, always doing things, hiking, knitting, reading, learning new languages, I love/ed cooking:-(
                                                > I am now realizing how important the sense of smell is. Not only does it help with eating or keep us safe from dangerous fumes, it plays a large, maybe very large role, in creating ones environment. I remember walking in the woods thinking deeply, and enjoying the smell of nature. I loved flowers.
                                                > Now I am passive when it comes to taking care of my animals, my own hygiene, brushing teeth, and cleaning in general. Not to mention that I have eaten spoiled food and didn't care. I find I touch things that before grossed me out. Also I am rarely motivated to leave my apartment.
                                                > In some way anosmia has been great- I would sit next to anyone on the bus, I don't judge people or things they way I did before. But I believe in some way anosmia has "disabled" my ability get motivated and make decisions.
                                                > I trust that over time I will adjust. But how much time? The crappy thing is that there is little to no research, and TBI rehab has not addressed Anosmia at all.
                                                > This could be a potential "short term" disability for those of us non-congenital types. But there are other considerations - previously in life I was in a security position where being able to catch the smell of flammable and hazardous material was very important. I wonder how I would handle things now if I was still employed there?
                                                >
                                                > --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "Jan" <janpinf@> wrote:
                                                > >
                                                > > So if an ability to smell something is an requirement of the job, is it routinely tested as part of the job interview process?
                                                > >
                                                > > I know people with congenital anosmia (in the Kallmann groups) in many different types of work where normosmics assume a sense of smell would be essential but it was never asked about and actually hasn't caused any difficulties. Biomedical labs, civil engineering labs, pharmaceuticals, nursing, military, police, farming, veterinarians, cooking, childcare, etc. etc.
                                                > >
                                                > > I wouldn't mind betting a large piece of date and walnut cake (yummy!:-) that osmic ability is seldom tested for most jobs - not even the police or fire service that people have given as examples in other posts.
                                                > >
                                                > > And if is NOT tested before taking up a job, how does someone prove that they lost their sense of smell AFTER taking up the job?
                                                > >
                                                > > Funny. But by that definition of disability and reversibility, then the congenital anosmics for whom anosmia is definitely not reversible should feel the most disabled. But we are the ones who generally feel the least disabled! :-)
                                                > >
                                                > > The difficulty with anosmia is that very few people will be able to prove beyond shadow of doubt that the anosmia is not reversible. Viral anosmics are probably the most likely to regain their sense of smell. Polyps, it comes and goes. Head bangers are highly unikely to regain their sense of smell, but it can happen even after many years.
                                                > >
                                                > > Those of us born with no olfactory bulbs, who never had and never will have a sense of smell are probably the best adjusted to life with NO aromas and generally do have a good sense of taste too. And we probably wouldn't be doing jobs where a sense of smell really was a contractual part of the job anyway. But according to what is written below - we can definitely claim disability.
                                                > >
                                                > > And where does that leave poor hypothetical Ada who had a bad cold and hasn't had a sense of smell for over a year, works in a kitchen and feels devasted by her anosmia (which may or may not be permanent, but nobody can say for definite either way).
                                                > >
                                                > > Sounds like a Catch-22 to me :-DDDDDDDDD
                                                > >
                                                > > Jan
                                                > >
                                                > >
                                                > > --- In anosmia@yahoogroups.com, "exit2eden" <exit2eden@> wrote:
                                                > > >
                                                > > > Not being able to smell is a "reversible" problem??? Well, if that's the case, then it's not a disability, as defined by the ADA!
                                                > > >
                                                > > > If the ability to smell is an essential job function and it cannot be "reasonably accommodated", then that's it...end of story. That goes for ANY disability.
                                                > > >
                                                > > > This link to the EEOC provides a good overview of the ADA and what is covered under the law: http://www.eeoc.gov/laws/types/disability.cfm
                                                > > >
                                                > >
                                                >

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