Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

SV: Bipedalism in Anolis

Expand Messages
  • Thomas Lakowitz
    In a conversation with a member of the list, I remembered of a Puerto Rican giant anole, Anolis cuvieri, which I saw running on two legs for a short distance.
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 2, 1999
    • 0 Attachment
      In a conversation with a member of the list, I remembered of a Puerto Rican giant anole, Anolis cuvieri, which I saw running on two legs for a short distance. Anybody knows of any other such cases in the genus?


      There is a report of two species of wateranoles, Anolis lionotus and Anolis poecilopus in Central America that runs on the water surface (Campbell, 1973; Ecological observations on Anolis lionotus and Anolis poecilopus (Reptilia, Sauris) in Panama) as reported for Basiliscus and Anolis pulchellus. It doesn't mention the method used by the lizards only that they do it. However its not unlikely they do it on two legs since I can imagine its easier to keep track of ones bodymovements when there is only two legs that shall be moved as fast as is required. Allthough these anoles are pretty small and might not sink so fast into the water. Bipedal walk is also enegy saving. This is only one of the escape responses they show. They also dive and run along the stream as well as over it to hide among rocks or debrie.

      /Thomas
    • Father Alejandro J. Sanchez Munoz
          In Puerto Rico I am aware of both
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 2, 1999
      • 0 Attachment
        <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en">
        <html>
        <body bgcolor="#B8B8B8">
            In Puerto Rico I am aware of both <i>pulchellus</i>
        and <i>cristatellus</i> running on water. <i>Pulchellus,</i> in particular,
        can lie still on water without breaking the water tension.
        <p>    I have read also about <i>A. vermiculatus</i> in
        Cuba running on two legs and crossing water courses.
        <p>In Domino,
        <br>    Father Sánchez
        <br> 
        <br> 
        <p>Thomas Lakowitz wrote:<font color="#000000"><font size=-1></font></font>
        <p><font color="#000000"><font size=-1>There is a report of two species
        of wateranoles, Anolis lionotus and Anolis poecilopus in Central America
        that runs on the water surface (Campbell, 1973; Ecological observations
        on Anolis lionotus and Anolis poecilopus (Reptilia, Sauris) in Panama)
        as reported for Basiliscus and Anolis pulchellus. It doesn't mention the
        method used by the lizards only that they do it. However its not unlikely
        they do it on two legs since I can imagine its easier to keep track of
        ones bodymovements when there is only two legs that shall be moved as fast
        as is required. Allthough these anoles are pretty small and might not sink
        so fast into the water. Bipedal walk is also enegy saving. This is only
        one of the escape responses they show. They also dive and run along the
        stream as well as over it to hide among rocks or debrie.</font></font>
        <blockquote TYPE=CITE>
        <blockquote
        style="BORDER-LEFT: #000000 solid 2px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"> 
        <br><font color="#000000"><font size=-1>/Thomas</font></font></blockquote>
        </blockquote>

        </body>
        </html>
      • Zainal L. Haberham
        ... Cool..knew about vermiculatus, didn t know about the other species though. Talking about vermiculatus...one ACG member keeps a single male, and is
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 2, 1999
        • 0 Attachment
          At 16:03 02/08/1999 -0400, father S´┐Żnchez wrote:
          > In Puerto Rico I am aware of both pulchellus and cristatellus running
          >on water. Pulchellus, in particular, can lie still on water without
          >breaking the water tension. I have read also about A. vermiculatus in
          >Cuba running on two legs and crossing water courses.

          Cool..knew about vermiculatus, didn't know about the other species though.

          Talking about vermiculatus...one ACG member keeps a single male, and is
          desparately looking for a female. Is this the last specimen in Europe, or
          are there any "list-lurkers" with acces to a female? On behalf of this ACG
          member, thanks for any replies!

          Cheers,
          Z.
          --------------
          Zainal L. Haberham
          Anolis Contact Group (ACG) web guy
          NL-1092KE87 Amsterdam, the Netherlands

          E-mail: z.l.haberham@...
          palardis@...

          Anolis equestris site:
          http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Plains/4489/anolis.htm
          ACG information site: http://greenfield.fortunecity.com/drongo/177/anole.htm
          ---------------
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.