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Anolis garmani

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  • Thomas Lakowitz <anolis@xxxx.xxxxxx.x
    I just want to fill in some things about garmani. I have had them for 11 years and I have one female still alive (more then 11 years old since she was wild
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 1, 1998
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      I just want to fill in some things about garmani. I have had them for 11 years
      and I have one female still alive (more then 11 years old since she was wild
      caught as an adult). The others are bred by me and some are of the 3.rd
      generation. I keep them in glassterrariums placed about 1 meter apart from each
      other. This way the males can watch another and do their displays. In my opinion
      this has been very healthy for their psychology as they always are alert to
      signals from the other male(s). They never bang into the glass since they are
      kept so far apart. If the terrariums are closer it could mean more stress as the
      animals then have a tendency to go against the glass. Then it woud be advisable
      to place a screen between so they cannot see each other.

      I have never experienced garmani as more stressed then other anoles(I would say,
      mine at least, are calmer then most anoles). I often find smaller anoles more
      stressed then the garmani. Wild caught animals however are of course more
      stressed. As I think back, my first wild caught garmanis where more stressed
      then the captive bred are. They males (also the captive bred) often display a
      threat behaviour when I put my hand to close to them (but you have to be pretty
      close) or if I stand at close range (less then 50 cm).

      When I come into the room with the food, they always react and become more alert
      to what they know will come, as they would if I just comes in with no food. I
      propably do some special movement in connection to the feeding of the animals,
      wich I myself am unaware of, that they react on. I always feed the individuals
      one by one with a metal thread. That way I am always sure that all animals are
      fed right and I avoid crickets running around eating up the orchids or
      bromeliads. This way the animals are more used to human contact then they would
      be if I just tossed in some insects to them. In the summer I always catch wild
      insects for them and those will of course just be tossed in. I think it is a
      good therapy for them to look for really small insects as well (and they eat
      even the smallest flies)

      About the size difference between male and female: according to
      litterature(Wijffels, Flaschendrager the female is about 80 mm and the male 131
      in bodylength (total length 250 mm female, 385 mm male), in the book by
      Heselhaus/Schmidt the total length should be around 350 mm for males and 260 mm
      for females. Those lengths vary of course a little. I have some males/females
      larger and some smaller. But if you look at the bodymass of the anilmals, the
      male is sometimes more the three times larger then the female and much heavier
      buildt.

      They reach maturity within a year (very much depending on the amount of food
      they get). The very young display "territorial behaviour" already within a
      month. But from what I have seen, they have never fought one another. This
      behaviour consists mainly of headbobbings.

      Thomas Lakowitz
    • Father Alejandro J. Sánchez Muñoz
      Just a remark. As I was looking at some Anolis garmani pics that Mr. Joe Burgess sent to me, I keep finding it very interesting that this species looks so
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 31, 2002
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            Just a remark.
         
            As I was looking at some Anolis garmani pics that Mr. Joe Burgess sent to me, I keep finding it very interesting that this species looks so un-giant-like. Especially, adults of other Greater Antillean giants (equestris, baleatus, cuvieri, and their respective kin) have this large, bony, casqued heads with large, keeled scales, high canthi rostralis, and these huge dewlaps.
         
            By comparison, A. garmani looks so stilized and "clean", and has a relatively small dewlap. One wonders if it will eventually evolve more into the appearance of its other giant congeners.
         
            My very few and short hands-on experiences with them tell me they are alert, fast and agile, more so than the relatively slow and lumbering others.
         
            I would love to see them in the wild.
         
            Does anybody here can tell me if they show the cryptic habit of pressing tight against a branch in order to pass unnoticed? (Joe, remember the A. baleatus we captured in Santo Domingo?)
         
            Also, the only two pics that I've seen of neonate/juvenile A. garmani show brown animals. Is this habitual? That is to say: neonates of the other giants are frequently colored quite different from adults (an extreme example of this is A. cuvieri.) So, does the same phenomenon occurs in A. garmani?
         
        Father Sánchez
         
        "We are not the sum of our weaknesses and failures;
        we are the sum of the Father's love for us
        and our real capacity to become the image of his Son."
        - Pope John Paul II
      • Bradford Chaucer
        ... Also a somewhat more granular appearing scalation ... Yes, extremely alert and skittish. When I tried to keep them, They would dive for cover any time I
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 3 9:15 PM
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          At 03:46 AM 7/31/2002, you wrote:
             By comparison, A. garmani looks so stilized and "clean", and has a relatively small dewlap.

          Also a somewhat more granular appearing scalation

           
              My very few and short hands-on experiences with them tell me they are alert, fast and agile, more so than the relatively slow and lumbering others.

          Yes, extremely alert and skittish. When I tried to keep them, They would dive for cover any time I entered the area where their tank was.

           
              I would love to see them in the wild.
           
              Does anybody here can tell me if they show the cryptic habit of pressing tight against a branch in order to pass unnoticed?

          I always found them to dive for cover rather than going cryptic



          Regards,
          Bradford Chaucer
          bradford.chaucer@...
        • Father Alejandro J. Sánchez Muñoz
          ... Ah. Another interesting difference, then. Padre We are not the sum of our weaknesses and failures; we are the sum of the Father s love for us and our real
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 3 10:17 PM
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            >I always found them to dive for cover rather than going
            cryptic
                Ah. Another interesting difference, then.
             
            Padre
             
            "We are not the sum of our weaknesses and failures;
            we are the sum of the Father's love for us
            and our real capacity to become the image of his Son."
            - Pope John Paul II
          • lambrechts
            HI, Yes, A garmani has a reputation for being very alert. Even animals that seem to be completely used to being handled and are used to living in a cage have
            Message 5 of 6 , Aug 4 6:13 AM
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              HI,
               
              Yes, A garmani has a reputation for being very alert. Even animals that seem to be completely used to being handled and are used to living in a cage have the tendancy  every now and than to be very easily scared without apparrent reasons.
               
              greetings
               
              denny
              Yes, extremely alert and skittish. When I tried to keep them, They would dive for cover any time I entered the area where their tank was.

               
            • elven_nomad
              suche 0,1 Anolis garmani auch suche 1,1 Anolis grahami
              Message 6 of 6 , Feb 24, 2004
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                suche 0,1 Anolis garmani

                auch

                suche 1,1 Anolis grahami
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