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Re: Iditarod cruelties promoted by National Geographic & General Mills

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  • whitewolf2025
    Whoever writes all this crap is full of it. Saying that these dogs live 24/7 in their own filth is a lie, feces are picked up at least once daily and most dogs
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 9, 2005
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      Whoever writes all this crap is full of it. Saying that these dogs
      live 24/7 in their own filth is a lie, feces are picked up at least
      once daily and most dogs will urinate/defecate in designated away
      from the areas where they spend most of their day. I've read so much
      crap online about the Iditarod it's not even funny - this Saraceno
      guy has no more understanding of the Iditarod than a toddler. I
      actually have my own kennel of sprint dogs that I race and you just
      can't keep up with everyone if your dogs are ill or abused.
      Everything the anti-Iditarod people say is either a plain lie or they
      are playing of off the bad people in the sport - and there are bad
      mushers who do bad things to their dogs just like anywhere else in
      life. Banning the Iditarod because a few people are bad makes no
      sense - it's like banning all of pet ownership because a few people
      beat their dogs. If we used that kind of logic we'd also have to ban
      cars because they kill a he** of a lot more dogs in 1 year than have
      ever died in the Iditarod combined. There are also anti-cruelty laws
      in place in the Iditarod and any other sled dog race that strictly
      prohibits any kind of abuse.



      --- In animalrightsdebateclub@yahoogroups.com, dadto8sofar
      <no_reply@y...> wrote:
      > John - I hope you don't mind, but there was a very similar (almost
      > verbatim) post about the iditarod in another group today so I cut
      and
      > pasted your response.
      >
      > -- In animalrightsdebateclub@yahoogroups.com, "John"
      <JLDickmon@w...>
      > wrote:
      > >
      > > >
      > > > Tom Classen, retired Air Force colonel and Alaskan resident for
      > > over 40
      > > > years, tells us that the dogs are beaten into submission:
      > > >
      > > > "They've had the hell beaten out of them." "You don't just
      whisper
      > > into
      > > > their
      > > > ears, ‘OK, stand there until I tell you to run like the
      devil.'
      > > They
      > > > understand one thing: a beating. These dogs are beaten into
      > > submission the
      > > > same way elephants are trained for a circus. The mushers will
      deny
      > > it. And
      > > > you know what? They are all lying." -USA Today, March 3, 2000
      in Jon
      > > > Saraceno's column
      > > >
      > > > Beatings and whippings are common. Jim Welch says in his book
      Speed
      > > Mushing
      > > > Manual, "I heard one highly respected [sled dog] driver once
      state
      > > that
      > > > "‘Alaskans like the kind of dog they can beat on.'" "Nagging
      a
      > > dog team is
      > > > cruel and ineffective...A training device such as a whip is not
      > > cruel at all
      > > > but is effective." "It is a common training device in use among
      dog
      > > > mushers...A whip is a very humane training tool."
      > >
      > >
      > > You know what? I'm not even going to dignify that garbage with a
      > > response.
      > >
      > >
      > > >
      > > > Mushers believe in "culling" or killing unwanted dogs,
      including
      > > puppies.
      > > > Many dogs who are permanently disabled in the Iditarod, or who
      are
      > > unwanted
      > > > for any reason, are killed with a shot to the head, dragged or
      > > clubbed to
      > > > death.
      > >
      > > Sorry. Wrong. Requires too much effort.
      > >
      > >
      > > "On-going cruelty is the law of many dog lots. Dogs are clubbed
      with
      > > > baseball bats and if they don't pull are dragged to death in
      > > harnesses....."
      > > > wrote Alaskan Mike Cranford in an article for Alaska's Bush
      Blade
      > > Newspaper
      > > > (March, 2000).
      > >
      > > Some people say a .38 to the back of the head is cruel, but it's
      as
      > > quick as sodium pentathol, and the dog can't see what's coming.
      > > Unlike injected euthanaisia, where the dog actually watches
      himself
      > > being killed by the veterinarian. So what's cruel?
      > >
      > > >
      > > > Jon Saraceno wrote in his March 3, 2000 column in USA
      Today, "He
      > > [Colonel
      > > > Tom
      > > > Classen] confirmed dog beatings and far worse. Like starving
      dogs to
      > > > maintain
      > > > their most advantageous racing weight.
      > >
      > > Fat dogs have health problems.
      > >
      > > > Skinning them to make mittens.
      > >
      > >
      > > Illegal.
      > >
      > >
      > > Or
      > > > dragging them to their death."
      > >
      > >
      > > Too hard on the rest of the team.
      > >
      > > The Colonel obviously has a personal agenda and vendetta.
      > >
      > > >
      > > > The race has led to the proliferation of horrific dog kennels
      in
      > > which the
      > > > dogs are treated very cruelly. Many kennels have over 100 dogs
      and
      > > some have
      > > > as many as 200.
      > >
      > > And operate six, seven or eight teams. Susan Butcher and her
      husband
      > > take teams on both the Iditarod and Yukon Quest. Both 1000 mile
      > > events, separated by a week. Neither would be very competitive if
      > > they ran in both events. It's like Joe Gibbs Racing in NASCAR.
      You
      > > have sprint teams, mid-distance teams, freight tems, pulling
      teams...
      > > and as far as proliferation, I seriously doubt it. Do you have
      ANY
      > > idea what it takes in the terms of food and veterinary expenses
      to
      > > maintain that kind of operation?
      > >
      > >
      > > It is standard for the dogs to spend their entire lives
      > > > outside tethered to metal chains that can be as short as four
      feet
      > > long. In
      > > > 1997 the United States Department of Agriculture determined
      that the
      > > > tethering of dogs was inhumane and not in the animals' best
      > > interests. The
      > > > chaining of dogs as a primary means of enclosure is prohibited
      in
      > > all cases
      > > > where federal law applies. A dog who is permanently tethered is
      > > forced to
      > > > urinate and defecate where he sleeps, which conflicts with his
      > > natural
      > > > instinct to eliminate away from his living area. Because he is
      > > close to his
      > > > own to his own fecal material, a dog can easily catch deadly
      > > parasitical
      > > > diseases by stepping in or sniffing his own waste.
      > >
      > > Who's shittin' who, here? Dog are kept above ground so the waste
      > > falls through the decking and is collected underneath. Hey, these
      > > dogs perform as athletes for a living. An UNHEALTHY dog will not
      > > perform. Only the healthiest and fittest dogs with the best
      training
      > > can be matched against Nature's Worst, the cold Alaskan interior.
      > >
      > >
      > > >
      > > > Iditarod dogs are unhappy prisoners with no chance of parole.
      > >
      > > Yeah. Sure. Tails wagging means they are PO'd and beat down. OK.
      > >
      > > Sorry about my language, but for cryin' out loud, I've been
      there,
      > > I've seen it, and this release is the biggest pack of smack
      garbage
      > > lies I have ever seen.
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