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Fishing in the Far North (Australia )

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  • QGAR
    Dear Friends, ... Fishing in the Far North http://www.abc.net.au/farnorth/stories/s1492742.htm?farnorth Friday, October 28, 2005 Been fishing? Did you bag a
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 1, 2005
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      Dear Friends,
      Heres an article at ABC site. Please contact ABC and voice your concerns. See sample letter below. Article reads:
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      Fishing in the Far North
      http://www.abc.net.au/farnorth/stories/s1492742.htm?farnorth
      Friday, October 28, 2005
      Been fishing? Did you bag a monster? Then obtain bragging rights by publishing your photos on this page

      We're looking for your fishing photos. If you've got a couple snaps you would like to have published on our website then simply upload them here, all you need to do is tell us your name, where you were fishing, what you caught and how big it was.
      By publishing your fishing photos here you'll be well on your way to eternal piscatorial glory and you'll have bragging rights over all of your friends.

      So get fishing and get snapping and don't forget to tell your friends that the one that didn't get away is now online at ABC Far North.

      Contact ABC far North

      http://www.abc.net.au/farnorth/contact.htm

      A sample letter

      Dear ABC Far North


      I am really appauled that you have such a inappropriate segment on your site celebrating the cruel "sport" of fishing.

      Scientists are starting to learn more and more about our finned friends, and their discoveries are fascinating:

      A recent issue of Fish and Fisheries, devoted to learning, cited more than 500 research papers on fish intelligence, proving that fish are smart, that they can use tools, and that they have impressive long-term memories and sophisticated social structures. The introductory chapter said that fish are "steeped in social intelligence, pursuing Machiavellian strategies of manipulation, punishment and reconciliation" exhibiting stable cultural traditions and cooperating to inspect predators and catch food."

      Culum Brown, a University of Edinburgh biologist who is studying the evolution of cognition in fish, says, "Fish are more intelligent than they appear. In many areas, such as memory, their cognitive powers match or exceed those of 'higher' vertebrates, including non-human primates." Their long-term memories help fish keep track of complex social relationships. Their spatial memory?"equal in all respects to any other vertebrate"allows them to create cognitive maps that guide them through their watery homes, using cues such as polarized light, sounds, smells, and visual landmarks

      Dr. Phil Gee, a psychologist from the University of Plymouth, says that fish can tell what time of day it is, and he trained fish to collect food by pressing a lever at specific times. He says "fish have a memory span of at least three months," and they "are probably able to adapt to changes in their circumstances, like any other small animals and birds."

      "We're now finding that [fish] are very capable of learning and remembering, and possess a range of cognitive skills that would surprise many people." Dr. Theresa Burt de Perera, Oxford University

      "Australian crimson spotted rainbowfish, which learnt to escape from a net in their tank, remembered how they did it 11 months later. This is equivalent to a human recalling a lesson learnt 40 years ago.".................Sunday Telegraph, Oct. 3, 2004

      Please rethink celebrating these cruel "sports" and glorifying them by encouraging people to post photos of their "catch".

      Sincerely


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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