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Sample letter:Non-residents too..NJ endorses murder of the innocent

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  • Rita Fazio
    Please, everyone write to Governor Mc Greevey, include the sad story in the alert below and in large letters, in a prominent place type, Remember the Animals:
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 10, 2003
      Please, everyone write to Governor Mc Greevey, include the sad story in the alert below and in large letters, in a prominent place type,
      "Remember the Animals:
      They Don't Vote, But People Who Love Them Do!!!!"
      OR
      "I'm Pro Animal and I VOTE!!!!"

      Below is a sample letter for non-NJ residents, but can be modified for residents. Please change the letter to suit your circumstances. Thanks.
      I have sent my letter via the web site, even non-residents can send from there.


      ***********SAMPLE LETTER*********

      Dear Governor McGreevey,

      I am writing on behalf of the New Jersey bears, which as you are aware, as you read this, are being slaughtered.

      This hunt is a black eye on New Jersey, and your office. It is an atrocity, that will not be forgotten for many, many years to come.
      Some of New Jersey's citizens were treated to an eyewitness account of the brutality of this hunt.
      Following is the account of this "incident" as published by The Star Ledger;

      And in a sad footnote, morning rush-hour commuters on Route 23 in West Milford got a front-row view of the hunt, when a mortally wounded cub staggered out of the woods, lay down with his head resting on the road, and died.

      "It just broke my heart, sitting there in traffic watching him die," said Kari Casper, a fourth-grade teacher from Vernon who was on her way to work in Lincoln Park.

      "He was just a little guy and looked so lonely, lying there with snow on his paws," said Casper, who said she cried as she watched the bear for about 20 minutes as she sat in traffic.

      West Milford police said they received at least 25 calls around 7:30 a.m. about the injured cub.

      "When we got there, he was dead and there were all these cars pulled on the side of the road and people crying," police dispatcher Lorraine Steins said. "I feel like we should apologize to the bears."

      Governor McGreevey, I have vacationed at the Jersey shore since I was a child, and through the years my children have enjoyed vacationing there, but you have effectively changed the way we all see New Jersey. I will no longer spend my tourist dollars in your state, there are many shore areas comparable in other States along the Eastern shore and I will advise others to do the same.

      I assure you that many of your citizens will be thinking about the following;

      "Remember the Animals:
      They Don't Vote, But People Who Love Them Do!!!!"

      Thank you for your time.
      Sincerely,

      From: "Black Beauty" lori1990 @ qwest.net
      Sent: Wednesday, December 10, 2003 1:01 PM



      CROSS POST WIDELY!!

      PLEASE WRITE LETTERS IN RESPONSE TO THE BELOW STAR LEDGER ARTICLE, WHICH STATES:

      "And in a sad footnote, morning rush-hour commuters on Route 23 in West Milford got a front-row view of the hunt, when a mortally wounded cub staggered out of the woods, lay down with his head resting on the road, and died."

      Please send letters from all over the world to the Star Ledger about this depravity happening in New Jersey. Let's not let this baby's death be in vain. Contact Governor McGreevey and tell him you hold him personally responsible for this evil.

      Governor James McGreevey
      PO Box 001
      Trenton, NJ 08625-0001
      609-292-6000
      e-mail from: http://www.state.nj.us/governor/govmail.html

      NOTE: If anyone can obtain the name, address, and place of work for this baby killer, let's spread it all over the Internet and let his neighbors and co-workers know what he did.

      Send letters to eletters @ starledger.com (remove spaces) (200 words maximum)

      http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/jersey/index.ssf?/base/news-5/107103925785800.xml

      Bear tally increases and hunt will widen to Federal parkland

      Wednesday, December 10, 2003

      BY BRIAN T. MURRAY AND JUDY PEET
      Star-Ledger Staff

      State environmental officials revised the death count for the first day of New Jersey's bear hunt, confirming yesterday that 116 bruins were killed on Monday, about 50 more than originally reported.

      An additional 36 were killed yesterday, bringing the two-day count to 152. Yesterday's kill, however, was as of 5 p.m. and considered preliminary because check-in stations were to remain open until 9 p.m.

      Meanwhile, final efforts by animal-rights activists to close at least part of New Jersey's bear territory to hunters were denied in both state and federal courts yesterday as the state's first bear hunt in 33 years was expanded into the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area.

      And in a sad footnote, morning rush-hour commuters on Route 23 in West Milford got a front-row view of the hunt, when a mortally wounded cub staggered out of the woods, lay down with his head resting on the road, and died.

      "It just broke my heart, sitting there in traffic watching him die," said Kari Casper, a fourth-grade teacher from Vernon who was on her way to work in Lincoln Park.

      "He was just a little guy and looked so lonely, lying there with snow on his paws," said Casper, who said she cried as she watched the bear for about 20 minutes as she sat in traffic.

      West Milford police said they received at least 25 calls around 7:30 a.m. about the injured cub.

      "When we got there, he was dead and there were all these cars pulled on the side of the road and people crying," police dispatcher Lorraine Steins said. "I feel like we should apologize to the bears."

      Steins said a hunter showed up some time later, identified the cub as his kill and took it away. The hunter was not cited because he had the proper state permit and had tracked the wounded bear out of the woods. There is no way to control where a wounded bear will go to die.

      At 10 p.m. Monday, state officials had said more than 70 bears were killed in the first day. But that number was later revised to 116.

      In all, 76 female and 40 male bears were killed Monday, according to a news release issued yesterday by the state Department of Environmental
      Protection. The majority of the bears -- 85 -- were shot in Sussex County, followed by 13 in Warren County, 10 in Passaic County, seven in Morris County and one in Bergen County.

      Of the 116, six had been previously identified as nuisance bears, and another five were found by hunters in areas with a history of human-bear conflicts. One bear had been previously found in an urban area and relocated.

      The DEP would not release additional details on the hunt, which was expanded into the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area yesterday after U.S. District Judge Reggie B. Walton in Washington, D.C., lifted a temporary restraining order.

      The order barring hunters from about 47,000 acres of the hunt territory was issued last week after several animal-rights groups filed suit.

      The suit claimed the National Park Service violated its own regulations in allowing the hunt on federal parkland without first conducting an environmental impact statement. It also claimed that members of three animal-rights groups would suffer irreparable damage from the hunt.

      The judge dismissed all counts, noting that: "... contrary to plaintiff's alarmist predictions, the black bear population at (the Delaware Water Gap) is not going to be decimated, or even significantly impacted, by this bear hunt."

      Walton's decision noted that bear complaints had surged from 285 in 1995 to more than 1,400 in 2002.

      The judge concluded that "the public interest favors permitting the state of New Jersey to conduct its limited hunt in order to manage its wildlife resources and hopefully promote a healthy and safe habitat for the residents
      who live in the vicinity of the Recreation Area."

      A similar suit, filed by Save Our Resources Today, sought to close state parks to the bear hunt. The state Supreme Court considered written arguments on that case yesterday, but denied, without comment, a motion to issue a temporary restraining order against the hunt.

      The bear hunt will continue through Saturday in all designated areas north of Route 78 and west of Route 287.

      Wildlife officials hope the hunt will reduce the state's estimated 3,200 bears by about 500. They plan to monitor the daily kill and determine if the hunt should last the full six days.

      Key to making that decision is how many tagged bears are killed. Earlier this year, DEP officials tagged 287 bears in the hunt area. So far, only about 6 percent of the bears that were killed bore tags.

      Officials say that indicates the hunt is only bagging a small percentage of the state's total bear population, and that prior DEP estimates that the population could be as high as 3,200 bears is proving to be accurate.

      Copyright 2003 The Star-Ledger.


      Humans aren't the only species on earth,
      we just act like it.

      www.GoBlackBeauty.com




      Rita Fazio,

      Korea Animal Protection Society (KAPS)
      International Aid for Korean Animals (IAKA)
      http://www.koreananimals.org/index.htm


      Don't turn your back upon their pain, because it's hard to see.They have no other place to turn, They've only you and me.






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