Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

LETTER: Deadline 2/14: Help Save Black Bears from Timber Companies

Expand Messages
  • Bonnie West
    Alert prepared by bbwest@snet.net (snet.net) Source: HUMANElines --- Issue 233 --- February 5, 2003 The USDA s Wildlife Services (WS) agency, a federal agency
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 6, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      Alert prepared by bbwest@... (snet.net)

      Source: HUMANElines --- Issue 233 --- February 5, 2003

      The USDA's Wildlife Services (WS) agency, a federal agency that kills
      wildlife across the country ostensibly for the sake of protecting
      agricultural interests, is soliciting public comments on its ongoing black
      bear "management" program for Oregon. WS has been killing black bears in
      Oregon for decades at the behest of the timber industry, because of damage
      to a small percentage of trees on tree plantations, related to the bears'
      normal feeding behavior. Some black bears peel tree bark to eat the
      nutritious cambium underbark, during certain times of the year. This damage
      is usually minimal and restricted to a small number of trees. But rather
      than using non-lethal techniques to discourage bears, timber companies have
      been contracting with WS to kill the bears at taxpayer expense-catching them
      in baited snares and then shooting them, or hunting
      them down with hounds. Even cubs, who will remain close to their mother if
      she is caught in a snare, are mercilessly killed. These bears would not have
      to die if WS used alternative forestry management practices, including tree
      pruning, delayed thinning of forests, urea fertilization, and improving tree
      stand diversity by including many species of trees of
      mixed ages.

      Send your comments to WS before Friday, February 14, asking it to forgo its
      lethal approach to managing bears in Western Oregon. Let them know that
      non-lethal and preventative forest management techniques (listed above)
      would better protect tree farms, and have not been adequately considered.
      Above all, killing is not the solution!


      CONTACT:

      USDA/APHIS/Wildlife Services
      6135 NE 80th Ave., Suite A8
      Portland OR 97218
      Fax: 503-326-2367

      SAMPLE LETTER:
      ===========================================


      Comments Re: Oregon's black bear management program

      To Whom It May Concern:

      Please record my Comments Re: Oregon's black bear management program as
      follows:

      I urge the Wildlife Services (WS) of Oregon to forgo its lethal approach to
      managing bears in Western Oregon.

      It is my understanding that WS has been killing black bears in Oregon for
      decades at the behest of the timber industry, because of damage to a small
      percentage of trees on tree plantations, related to the bears' normal
      feeding behavior. Some black bears peel tree bark to eat the nutritious
      cambium underbark, during certain times of the year. This damage is usually
      minimal and restricted to a small number of trees. But rather than using
      non-lethal techniques to discourage bears, timber companies have been
      contracting with WS to kill the bears at taxpayer expense-catching them in
      baited snares and then shooting them, or hunting them down with hounds. Even
      cubs, who will remain close to their mother if she is caught in a snare, are
      mercilessly killed. These bears would not have to die if WS used alternative
      forestry management practices, including tree pruning, delayed thinning of
      forests, urea fertilization, and improving tree stand diversity by including
      many species of trees of mixed ages.

      Please employ ONLY nonlethal and preventative forest management techniques
      to address these conflicts, which would better protect tree farms, and have
      not been adequately considered. Above all, killing is not the solution, and
      I strongly oppose the use of my tax dollars to support it.

      Thank you for accepting Public Comments on this important issue. I look
      forward to your decision.

      Sincerely,
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.