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Spectacular photoessay of the Red River floods

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  • minnesotastan
    This isn t ancient or directly related to diffusion of knowledge but it certainly is a waterways topic and does affect some of our members directly or
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 28, 2009
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      This isn't "ancient" or directly related to "diffusion of knowledge" but it certainly is a "waterways" topic and does affect some of our members directly or indirectly.

      The wonderful photoblog "The Big Picture"at Boston.com has a collection of 30 large-format photos of the situation on the ND/MN border. The link is here:

      http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2009/03/red_river_flooding.html

      Fighting a flood is hard enough; doing so while wading among ice floes in freezing weather is heroic. Normally I have only modest sympathy for those who live in flood plains or at seaside, but the topography of the old Lake Agassiz region is so flat that people miles from the river are affected. These are not people who built riverside to enjoy a view; these are farmers working the land for food we eat. My kudos especially to those college students who decided to sandbag rather than go south for their spring break.
    • Chris Patenaude
      Heartfelt thank you, Stan. Your point is so well put. I live a mile away from the river in this little town. To the grasp of the water s potential, here in the
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 28, 2009
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        Heartfelt thank you, Stan. Your point is so well put. I live a mile away from the river in this little town. To the grasp of the water's potential, here in the geography of this place, it is but 'spittin' distance'. It's but shoulder shrug for this major stream to spill across the gap to this point so distant from the channel's banks. When hubby and i moved here, the river seemed so ever-far over in the distance. There is no 'waterfront property' designation to this town... ha! untiil things like this happen. Here we've had TWO  "500-yr flood" events in the span of 12 yrs. with two other "100-yr" floods in between. This was not what we signed on for 35 yrs ago when we settled and put down roots. Yet another sign of Global Warming?
         
        What ever the decisions of yesteryears, we're here, now. There's everything to fight for. So we go on.
         
        Thanks again to everyone.
        -chris

        --- On Sat, 3/28/09, minnesotastan <minnesotastan@...> wrote:

        From: minnesotastan <minnesotastan@...>
        Subject: [ancient_waterways_society] Spectacular photoessay of the Red River floods
        To: ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Saturday, March 28, 2009, 9:58 AM

        This isn't "ancient" or directly related to "diffusion of knowledge" but it certainly is a "waterways" topic and does affect some of our members directly or indirectly.

        The wonderful photoblog "The Big Picture"at Boston.com has a collection of 30 large-format photos of the situation on the ND/MN border.  The link is here:

        http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2009/03/red_river_flooding.html

        Fighting a flood is hard enough; doing so while wading among ice floes in freezing weather is heroic.  Normally I have only modest sympathy for those who live in flood plains or at seaside, but the topography of the old Lake Agassiz region is so flat that people miles from the river are affected.  These are not people who built riverside to enjoy a view; these are farmers working the land for food we eat.  My kudos especially to those college students who decided to sandbag rather than go south for their spring break.



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      • Susan
        I appreciated the photos and comments, Stan. While we are waiting further word about the flooding, here is a little more about Ancient Lake Agassiz. The area
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 28, 2009
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          I appreciated the photos and comments, Stan.  While we are waiting further word about the flooding, here is a little more about Ancient Lake Agassiz.  The area of MN and SD in the news right now can be seen at the south end from this early US Geological Survery map (click to enlarge):  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Agassiz

          Discussion and study of the Red River and ancient Lake Agassiz seems very relevant for this group,  and am also very touched by the outreach from this and the THOR group to Chris and others living in the flooded area.

          I was unable to find much current on ancient Lake Agassiz and the Red River of the North; most articles were from the 70's w/inoperational links.  Perhaps later someone might post more to the group on this highly significant ancient and current waterway of North America.  One article referred to the Red River w/fertile flood plain as the 'North American Nile'.

          Susan

          --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "minnesotastan" <minnesotastan@...> wrote:
          >
          > This isn't "ancient" or directly related to "diffusion of knowledge" but it certainly is a "waterways" topic and does affect some of our members directly or indirectly.
          >
          > The wonderful photoblog "The Big Picture"at Boston.com has a collection of 30 large-format photos of the situation on the ND/MN border. The link is here:
          >
          > http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2009/03/red_river_flooding.html
          >
          > Fighting a flood is hard enough; doing so while wading among ice floes in freezing weather is heroic. Normally I have only modest sympathy for those who live in flood plains or at seaside, but the topography of the old Lake Agassiz region is so flat that people miles from the river are affected. These are not people who built riverside to enjoy a view; these are farmers working the land for food we eat. My kudos especially to those college students who decided to sandbag rather than go south for their spring break.
          >

        • herbswoods
          There are hundreds if not thousands of old glacial spillway channels in this region that come back to life again during the spring melt or high water events.
          Message 4 of 5 , Mar 29, 2009
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            There are hundreds if not thousands of old glacial spillway channels in this region that come back to life again during the spring melt or high water events. Right here my modest little river becomes a raging monster in some years as the old channel refills and drains south into the Mississippi. But still just a tiny memory of the myriad of braided meltwater channels early peoples would have seen 8,000-9,000 years ago during the final stages of the last glaciation period. No trouble to transport copper out of here!

            --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "Susan" <beldingenglish@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > I appreciated the photos and comments, Stan. While we are waiting
            > further word about the flooding, here is a little more about Ancient
            > Lake Agassiz. The area of MN and SD in the news right now can be seen
            > at the south end from this early US Geological Survery map (click to
            > enlarge): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Agassiz
            > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Agassiz>
            >
            > Discussion and study of the Red River and ancient Lake Agassiz seems
            > very relevant for this group, and am also very touched by the outreach
            > from this and the THOR group to Chris and others living in the flooded
            > area.
            >
            > I was unable to find much current on ancient Lake Agassiz and the Red
            > River of the North; most articles were from the 70's w/inoperational
            > links. Perhaps later someone might post more to the group on this
            > highly significant ancient and current waterway of North America. One
            > article referred to the Red River w/fertile flood plain as the 'North
            > American Nile'.
            >
            > Susan
            >
            > --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "minnesotastan"
            > <minnesotastan@> wrote:
            > >
            > > This isn't "ancient" or directly related to "diffusion of knowledge"
            > but it certainly is a "waterways" topic and does affect some of our
            > members directly or indirectly.
            > >
            > > The wonderful photoblog "The Big Picture"at Boston.com has a
            > collection of 30 large-format photos of the situation on the ND/MN
            > border. The link is here:
            > >
            > > http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2009/03/red_river_flooding.html
            > >
            > > Fighting a flood is hard enough; doing so while wading among ice floes
            > in freezing weather is heroic. Normally I have only modest sympathy for
            > those who live in flood plains or at seaside, but the topography of the
            > old Lake Agassiz region is so flat that people miles from the river are
            > affected. These are not people who built riverside to enjoy a view;
            > these are farmers working the land for food we eat. My kudos especially
            > to those college students who decided to sandbag rather than go south
            > for their spring break.
            > >
            >
          • Susan
            Herb (and All), In relation to the old US Natl Geographic Survey map, I was not sure which modest little river you are referring to near where you live,
            Message 5 of 5 , Mar 31, 2009
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              Herb (and All),

              In relation to  the old US Natl Geographic Survey map,   I was not sure which 'modest little river' you are referring to near where you live, presumable the Namekagin, Totagotic or one near the Minong Flowage.  I see the southernmost part of Lake Agassiz was some distance from NE Wisonsin, but having fished near the mouth of rivers such as the Montreal, Presque Isle and still shudder below the roar of the region's still-raging riverways,  I can only imagine what raged through there several thousand years ago.   Herb, do you have old maps or drawings of NW Wisconsin you can post showing old glacial runoffs in relationship to rivers south and Lake Superior, esp. in lieu of the underwater rock structures you photographed.  And of course, isostatic rebound is something I learned not too many years ago and always keep in mind in lieu of the nortern aspects of the continent, Great Lakes waterways, old shorelines, etc.

              Herb, while addressing you here specifically, did you get a chance to get to your ancient underwater structure last summer or fall, and have your thoughts about the site changed at all since you first put up photos of the site?   For newcomers to Ancient Waterways,  I am re-inserting Herb's web page.   I suggest too checking out some of his other web sites: 'At the Creation', "Herb's Woods' ... to view exquisite landscapes and underwater photography that comes as close as anything I have seen to representing Nature and reverencing maintaining the integrity of pristine settings.  Thanks for your continuing efforts to share your treks into the wilds with us. 

              For those who also were unable to view Ted Sojka's photo at the site,  those who signed up for "Individual Emails" or "Daily Digest" would have received the photos through emails.  Those enrolled under "Members" as "No Email" or "Special Notices" would not have.   If photos, downloads, etc.  are Posted at the AWS as "links", then everyone gets them.  That is why the photos that accompanied Judi Rudebusch's mooring stones web site  never came through, but once helps her set up the article as a web link, she or I will re-submit the excellent site to this group.  Member Dr. Jim Scherz also countless papers/reports/surveys,  besides the ones Midwestern Epigraphic Society has already put up at their site, that hopefully someone can help him made into links, which he has long expressed willingness to share here at a site named, in part, in his honor.

              I appreciate hearing specifics and general locations of  waterways by each of you at this site near where you live, or you frequent, kayak/canoe/sail, dive, etc.  The sharing of historic and scientific information by members from around the world in regard to your nearest or favored waterway(s) was an underlying motive behind an ancient waterways group such as this.  

              Anyone wanting to recheck Herb Wagner's intriguing site about the anomalous rectangular sqare stones or blocks,  it is easy to find via a google search 'ancient underwater road?'  I've no doubt you have had many inquiries from around the world on the site.  Fortunately it seems it is remote and hopefully being looked after by a 'cousin' to the Mishegenabeg superiorensis which I seriously never fail to keep in mind, especially intent, when  kayaking, fishing, snorkeling, diving, and camping  within certain pristine wilderness areas or native lands.

              Susan

              --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "herbswoods" <herbswoods@...> wrote:
              >
              > There are hundreds if not thousands of old glacial spillway channels in this region that come back to life again during the spring melt or high water events. Right here my modest little river becomes a raging monster in some years as the old channel refills and drains south into the Mississippi. But still just a tiny memory of the myriad of braided meltwater channels early peoples would have seen 8,000-9,000 years ago during the final stages of the last glaciation period. No trouble to transport copper out of here!
              >
              > --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "Susan" beldingenglish@ wrote:
              > >
              > >
              > > I appreciated the photos and comments, Stan. While we are waiting
              > > further word about the flooding, here is a little more about Ancient
              > > Lake Agassiz. The area of MN and SD in the news right now can be seen
              > > at the south end from this early US Geological Survery map (click to
              > > enlarge): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Agassiz
              > > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Agassiz>
              > >
              > > Discussion and study of the Red River and ancient Lake Agassiz seems
              > > very relevant for this group, and am also very touched by the outreach
              > > from this and the THOR group to Chris and others living in the flooded
              > > area.
              > >
              > > I was unable to find much current on ancient Lake Agassiz and the Red
              > > River of the North; most articles were from the 70's w/inoperational
              > > links. Perhaps later someone might post more to the group on this
              > > highly significant ancient and current waterway of North America. One
              > > article referred to the Red River w/fertile flood plain as the 'North
              > > American Nile'.
              > >
              > > Susan
              > >
              > > --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "minnesotastan"
              > > <minnesotastan@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > This isn't "ancient" or directly related to "diffusion of knowledge"
              > > but it certainly is a "waterways" topic and does affect some of our
              > > members directly or indirectly.
              > > >
              > > > The wonderful photoblog "The Big Picture"at Boston.com has a
              > > collection of 30 large-format photos of the situation on the ND/MN
              > > border. The link is here:
              > > >
              > > > http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2009/03/red_river_flooding.html
              > > >
              > > > Fighting a flood is hard enough; doing so while wading among ice floes
              > > in freezing weather is heroic. Normally I have only modest sympathy for
              > > those who live in flood plains or at seaside, but the topography of the
              > > old Lake Agassiz region is so flat that people miles from the river are
              > > affected. These are not people who built riverside to enjoy a view;
              > > these are farmers working the land for food we eat. My kudos especially
              > > to those college students who decided to sandbag rather than go south
              > > for their spring break.
              > > >
              > >
              >

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